They Sing Sea Songs Down by the Seashore -- Vegetarian Sea Shanties of a Sort

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 17, 2015 09:03am | Post a Comment
"Colin Hunter" "their only harvest" (1879)
Their Only Harvest by Colin Hunter (1879)

I wrote a guide to sea vegetables over at my blog. As a companion piece here at the Amoeblog, I thought I’d compile a guide to modern day sea shanties by vegetarian (or former vegetarian, in some cases) songwriters or bands with vegetarian members.
Seaweed Gatherers (1926) by Harold Harvey
Seaweed Gatherers (1926) by Harold Harvey 

Belle & Sebastian - “Ease Your Feet in the Sea”

Blur - "This is a Low"

Bob Marley And The Wailers - “High Tide Or Low Tide”

New "What's in My Bag?" Episode with Mexican Singer/Songwriter Natalia Lafourcade

Posted by Amoebite, November 16, 2015 05:59pm | Post a Comment

Natalia Lafourcade at Amoeba

Natalia Lafourcade is a Mexican pop/rock singer and songwriter from Coatepec. While growing up, she performed in a mariachi band and in an all-girl trio called Twist before going solo at age seventeen. Her self-titled debut album was released in 2002, garnering her a GRAMMY nomination for Best Latin Pop Album. Three years later, she released her followup, Casa, as Natalia y La Forquetina, which was the name of her band at the time. In 2006, she announced she would be leaving the band to perform as a solo artist once again.

Natalia LaFourcade Hasta la Raiz

Lafourcade continued to release solo albums, with her 2009 release, Hu Hu Hu, becoming a Top 10 album in Mexico and receiving nominations for Best Latin Pop Album at the GRAMMYs and Best Female Pop Vocal Album at the Latin GRAMMY Awards. Her 2015 release, Hasta La Rai­z, and its single of the same name have been nominated for five awards at this year's Latin GRAMMYs. Watch her perform live on the awards show, held at the MGM Grand Arena in Las Vegas, Thursday, November 19th.

Get to know Lafourcade a little deeper as she shares many of the albums that influenced her during a recent chat with our "What's In My Bag?" crew at Amoeba Hollywood. She starts with Joni Mitchell's classic Blue, the biggest musical inspiration for her current album. She also talks about Erykah Badu's seminal Mama's Gun, Edith Piaf's Je Ne Regrette Rien, and delves into the catalog of Nick Drake.

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Moog's Theremini Has Landed at Amoeba SF!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 15, 2015 07:11pm | Post a Comment

In 1919, Russian electro physicist Lev Sergejewitch Termen invented the Theremin - the only Moog Thereminiinstrument that generates sound without being touched. Notoriously hard to play, it is one of the first electronic instruments that inspired the creation of synthesizers in future generations. Horror films and "Good Vibrations" haven't been the same since.

We know learning to play the Theremin has been on your bucket list for a long time. You don't have wait for the New Year to get a jump on this resolution. Luckily, the good folks at Moog have brought the unmistakably memorable, otherworldly sound within the reach of the common man with their new Theremini - a re-imagination of the Theremin. Amoeba SF currently has several in stock and, at $299.98, they will make excellent holiday gifts!

The Theremini design fuses the experience of performing with an instrument you don’t actually touch with a powerful sound engine derived from Moog’s award winning synthesizer, Animoog. The Theremini guarantees immediate success to any player at any skill level, while providing new ways to experiment with music, education, and gestural control.

We at Amoeba SF were honored with a live Theremini demo and in-store performance with Theremin Dorit Chrysler, Moog Thereminivirtuoso Dorit Chrysler who held her one-hour "hands on" workshop, KID COOL THEREMIN SCHOOL, on October 30th. Ten lucky customers got to try out the Theremini under her expert tutelage on the Amoeba stage. The electro joy was contagious as the class gathered a rapt audience who couldn't wait to try it out for themselves.

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Weekly Roundup: Ty Segall, Ty Dolla Sign, Damon Eliza Palmero, Babes

Posted by Billy Gil, November 13, 2015 04:31pm | Post a Comment

Ty Segall Emotional Mugger video

ty segall emotional mugger lpBy now, you must know Ty Segall is a busy guy, recording something like 96 albums a year between his various projects (that’s actually closer to four or so, but who’s counting). Still, despite having just released a new album of smashing proto-metal with Fuzz, forming several new bands and re-releasing his T. Rex cover albums as a set on Black Friday, he’s also got just a plain ol’ new album on the way (so the next time you’re feeling spread thin … think of Ty Segall and get to work!). Emotional Mugger is due Jan. 22 on Drag City and was announced by sending a VHS tape of the album to various editors. Pitchfork says they got a copy of the 1993 film My Life at the end of the album, as well as Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan on another tape. But no worries if you don’t have a VHS player anymore—the album will be released on all the normal formats. We haven’t heard any songs yet, but apparently an emotional mugger is a “non-verbal and non-physical emotional exchange,” as we’ve gleaned from this faux-educational video starring Segall.

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Album Picks: Oneohtrix Point Never, Frankie Cosmos, King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard, Panda Bear

Posted by Billy Gil, November 13, 2015 12:10pm | Post a Comment

Oneohtrix Point Never - Garden Of Delete

oneohtrix point never garden of delete lpDaniel Lopatin’s second release on Warp as Oneohtrix Point Never is hell-bent on defying expectations. A song like “Ezra” begins with cut-up, recognizable motifs but becomes destroyed by diversions into heart-pounding 16-bit synth chases and vocal snippets emerging from its distorted folds. “I Bite Through It” engages in pop-rock structure yet mocks it at the same time, its sharp notes arranged neatly in sets of eight, which are broken up by a hard-hitting beat and more scenic portions, its tones varying without rhyme or reason across the song’s taut three minutes and 17 seconds. Similarly, the guttural vocals and laser-beam synths exploding out of “Sticky Drama” achieve EDM-style release even as its brutal middle portion feels insanity-inducing. But the need to step away now and then only proves the album’s power. Part of Garden of Delete’s strength is its ability to temper its dislocating sense of confusion with clear reference points that help the listener find their balance. The smoky, hollowed-out beginning of “Freaky Eyes” gives way to pipe organs, sudden swells and noises that skitter around like beetles, making it feel like a horror movie soundtrack collage. “Lift’s” disembodied vocal bits and layered piano runs feel alien but are lovely nonetheless. The more pronounced vocals on “Animals” make it easily noticeable, but it would be a standout regardless, its tones disintegrating beautifully while a pitch-shifted vocal comes in and out of static in a way not entirely different from Radiohead. Oneohtrix Point Never is an acquired taste that occasionally feels like it needs Cliff’s Notes to fully grasp. But it’s undoubtedly some of the most intelligent, forward-thinking music being made today. Those willing to take the plunge will be duly rewarded.

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