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Show Recap: Robyn & Royksopp at the Hollywood Bowl

Posted by Billy Gil, June 30, 2014 12:37pm | Post a Comment

robyn royksopp

Screenshots via YouTube

Robyn & Royksopp absolutely tore it up for a sold-out, double-headliner bill at the Hollywood Bowl last night. The pair were promoting their new collaborative mini-album, Do It Again, and while that album is plenty terrific and they did play songs from it, both acts also made good with the hits, and Robyn played a couple of rare and/or new songs.

Royksopp played a set healthy with songs from their earlier albums (such as A.M.’s “Eple” and “Poor Leno”) and perhaps understandably with fewer tracks from their most recent album, Senior, a darker and instrumental affair compared with the flashing lights and high-profile guest spots of 2009’s companion album, Junior. The songs from that album sounded fantastic here, with a guest singer standing in nicely for The Knife/Fever Ray’s Karin Dreijer Andersson (no terrifying mask, though) on Junior highlight “This Must Be It.” It sounded fantastic, though perhaps a bit subdued, but that may have been due to me having nosebleed seats.

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Music History Monday: June 30

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 30, 2014 07:11am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: June 30, 1973Fresh, the sixth album by Sly & The Family Stone is released. Produced by Sly Stone, it is recorded at The Record Plant in Los Angeles and Sausalito circa 1972 - Spring 1973. After the release of There's A Riot Goin' On in late 1971, Sly & The Family Stone will see their first personnel changes with the departure of bassist Larry Graham and drummer Gregg Errico, both having left under acrimonious circumstances. Sessions for the band's next album will begin in early 1972. The new album will introduce new band members bassist Rusty Allen and drummer Andy Newmark to the fold, though many of the tracks feature Sly playing all of the instruments himself. During the nearly 18 months that he works on the album, Sly will constantly remix and re-record several of the songs, resulting in different versions of the material. The album will spin off two hits, including the band's last million-selling single "If You Want Me To Stay" (#3 R&B, #12 Pop). When the album is first released on CD in the early '90s, alternate masters using the wrong mixes will initially be released until it is withdrawn and replaced with the correct version. This version of the album will become a sought after collector's item among Sly fans. The album's cover photo is taken by famed photographer Richard Avedon (The Beatles). Fresh will spend three weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number seven on the Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Phono Del Sol: 10 Bands & 2 Stages in SF's Potrero del Sol Park, July 12

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, June 29, 2014 05:59pm | Post a Comment
thao & the get down stay down
Thao & The Get Down Stay Down

Amoeba is overjoyed to join The Bay Bridged and Tiny Telephone for the 4th annual Phono Del Sol music festival on Saturday, July 12th. This all-day festival celebrates the best of San Francisco's acclaimed independent music and food scenes with ten live bands on two stages in Potrero del Sol Park. Rock out with Wye Oak, Thao & The Get Down Stay Down, Nick Waterhouse, Blackbird Blackbird, White Fence, Yalls, Tony Molina, A Million Billion Dying Suns, The Tambo Rays, and Bill Baird, while perusing local food trucks, arts and crafts vendors, and more. There's no better way to spend an SF summer day!

Get your tickets HERE!

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Rest In Peace Soul Legend Bobby Womack

Posted by Billyjam, June 28, 2014 06:56am | Post a Comment

Bobby Womack "Across 100th Street" on Soul Train (1973)

 
Following several hours of unconfirmed online reports yesterday, it was finally confirmed in the early evening by his publicist that soul legend Bobby Womack had died Friday at the age of 70. What makes this news all the more shocking is that Womack had just performed two weeks ago at the Bonnaroo Music Festival. Although no exact cause of death was announced, the soul-singing great, who will be remembered for such hits as his own "Across 110th Street" and The Rolling Stones' hit "It's All Over Now" (which he wrote), had suffered numerous ailments in recent years including colon cancer, pneumonia, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease.

The Ohio-born Womack, who five years ago was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, had enjoyed a long career with a resurgence in popularity that began thanks in large part to fan Quentin Tarantino choosing the 1972 hit "Across 110th Street" as the opening theme song for his film Jackie Brown. For those who don't already have any Bobby Womack in their collections, recommended releases by the artist include the 2012 reissue release Across 110th Street-40th Anniv (CD) and the 11 track Icon series collection release Icon - The Best Of Bobby Womack (CD) that includes such gems as "Woman's Gotta Have It," "That's The Way I Feel About Cha," and "Across 100th Street."
 

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Digging in the Crates of OMCA's "Vinyl: The Sound and Culture of Records" Pt 1 featuring Marc Weinstein

Posted by Billyjam, June 27, 2014 11:35pm | Post a Comment


Since it opened two months ago (fittingly on Record Store Day, April 19th), the Oakland Museum of California's (OMCA) ongoing exhibit Vinyl: The Sound and Culture of Records has been resoundingly popular and is attracting museum visitors of vinyl, the sound and culture of records at oakland museum of californiaall ages and generations, from those who grew up with records to those too young to have ever seen vinyl firsthand or had opportunity (until now) to put down the needle and experience playing vinyl in all its analog glory.

The exhibit, which runs through July 27th, is sponsored by Amoeba Music who supplied nearly all of the vinyl for the hands-on exhibit. The action is in OMCA's Great Hall alongside another cool exhibit scheduled for the same run: Eric Nakamura's  SuperAwesome: Art and Giant Robot exhibit.

As well as supplying nearly all of the records on exhibit and featuring a window display at the Berkeley Amoeba store dedicated solely to the OMCA exhibit, several Amoeba staffers have contributed to the exhibit by way of curating the numerous crates that dot the cavernous exhibit hall. These include Gail Todd, Marc Weinstein, Lori Katz, and myself who are among numerous other contributing music nerds -- such as avid local rap collector 12 Man Rambo, noted San Francisco producer Dan the Automator, and author Denise Sullivan -- who each drew up lists of 33 records per crate (some more, some less).
 

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