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Robert DeLong Headlines Inaugural First Fridays Show of 2015 on Feb. 6

Posted by Billy Gil, January 21, 2015 02:38pm | Post a Comment

first fridays

Amoeba will be on hand for the opening show of First Fridays at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles Feb. 6. Tickets are $18 and can be purchased here.

robert delong
Robert DeLong live at Amoeba SF Feb. 20, 2013

The first show of the season will feature EDM artist Robert DeLong. We know from the livewire show he put on at Amoeba Hollywood that this isn’t a show to be missed, as DeLong trades between setting off various sequencers, playing the drums and getting the crowd riled up for his electrifying anthems. DeLong’s latest album is Just Movement.

Prior to DeLong’s performance, Tom Vek will take the stage. The British singer/songwriter uses post-punk beats and electronic noise for a unique sound on albums like last year’s excellent Luck. Also opening the show will be Southern California’s QUITAPENAS. The band combines Afro-Latin beats with tropical-psych guitars and Spanish-sung vocals for a SoCal-style mashup that feels natural and is a lot of fun to listen and dance to.

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Rest In Peace Big Chief Bo Dollis of the Wild Magnolia Mardi Gras Indian Band

Posted by Billyjam, January 21, 2015 11:26am | Post a Comment

Yesterday, Jan 20th 2015, the music world lost Bo Dollis of the Wild Magnolias who was one of greatest ambassadors of New Orleans style Mardi Gras Indian funk. He was 71 years of age. No exact cause of death has been announced but Dollis had been in poor health for past several years. Born Theodore Emile "Bo" Dollis in 1944, Dollis was the longtime Big Chief of the Wild Magnolias Mardi Gras Indians who as a young teen growing up in New Orleans joined the Golden Arrows Mardi Gras Indians, then after joining the Wild Magnolias as flag boy. But by the time he was 20 he had already risen in the ranks to that of Big Chief status. As such he was part of a whole new generation of Mardi Gras Indians to promote the culture in a positive light, focusing on the costumes (see above image of Dollis in full costume) more and and to turn away from violence, something strongly associated with and prevalent in previous decades. As such Dollis was pioneering in bringing the culture and sound of the Mardi Gras Indian culture to national awareness and acclaim. He was a trailblazer of the culture by recording the first commercial album of Mardi Gras Indian music  in 1970 best known by the single "Handa Wanda" that was a traditionally-rooted new Indian song written by Dollis (audio only video below). He was also a pioneer at that same year when along with Monk Boudreaux of the Golden Eagles Mardi Gras Indians and and a young Quint Davis he performed at the original New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Fast forward four years and he would recording the acclaimed landmark album The Wild Magnolias that married funk sounds with Indian chants and hence  made it more palatable to more American ears. That album also featured Snooks Eaglin, Willie Tee, Uganda Roberts, Earl Turbinton, and Bo's wife Laurita Dollis. Four years ago he was honored with the prestigious National Endowment for the Arts' National Heritage Fellowship.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With London's Fat White Family

Posted by Amoebite, January 20, 2015 06:52pm | Post a Comment

Fat White Family

Some might say The Fat White Family is British rock & roll's final hurrah. On or off stage the South London rockers give it to you straight. No sugar coating, no beating around the bush, no gimmicks. Just Fat Whiteone hundred percent pure, unadulturated, in your face rock and roll. Their wild stage antics and blunt anti-elitist views excite fans and leave others confused. Unfazed by the lure of fame and the rock star status most indie bands dream of, The Fat White Family only care about staying true to their own beliefs, no matter how unconventional or far left they may come off. From squatting to couch surfing to befriending and shacking up with Sean Lennon, The Fat White Family have come a long way in a short amount of time.

After releasing their debut album, Champagne Holocaust (Fat Possum, 2014) and touring relentlessly, the band was recently named one of NME's "50 New Bands to Watch in 2015" and appeared on the cover with the headline "The Most Dangerous Band in Britain." The group is currently working on their second album in New York, with a little help from co-producer Sean Lennon. How many new bands can say they used John Lennon's gear on their record? Pretty freaking awesome.   

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Top Five State of the Union Songs

Posted by Billyjam, January 20, 2015 02:52pm | Post a Comment
At 9pm Eastern time and 6pm Pacific time today (Jan 20th, 2015) President Barack Obama is scheduled to give his State of the Union (SOTU) speech that can be viewed on various TV stations as well as via the White House website stream. His sixth SOTU address and his first State of the Union address since Republicans took control of Congress,  this evening's address is likely to touch on such topics as the rebounding economy, increased taxing of the wealthy, the latest developments with Cuba, and the recent subject of the push to make community colleges free for students - as well as references to the many specially invited citizen guests in the house.

For more SOTU info visit the White House SOTU website page or check out the video below of the interview Obama on what to expect tonight - "Behind The Scenes: Sit Down with President Obama" that was uploaded yesterday. But ahead of that video are the Top Five "State of the Union" video song list with lyric excerpts from each song to get take on where they're coming from that range from punk to classic rock to folk and dub.



Rise Against "State of the Union (Live)"


#1: Rise Against's "State of the Union" song, which was the opening track off the Chicago hardcore punk outfit's 2004 album Siren Song of the Counter Culture, was - as the intro to the live performance above indicates - a vehemently anti George W Bush and his war song; a fact further proven by such no holds barred song lyrics as: "Reads war torn country still a mess The words, power, death, and distorted truth Are read between the lines of the red, white, and blue Countdown to the very end Equality, an invitation that we wont extend Ready aim, pull the trigger now Its time you firmly secure your place in hell"

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Album Picks: Belle & Sebastian, Sleater-Kinney, Hanni El Khatib, Amen Dunes

Posted by Billy Gil, January 20, 2015 11:27am | Post a Comment

Belle & SebastianGirls in Peacetime Want to Dance

belle sebastian girls in peacetime want to dance lp

In the latter half of their career, Belle & Sebastian have consistently tried to balance the desire to appeal to a wider audience with more outward-facing pop songs alongside the bookish indie pop that netted them a cult of worshipping devotees in the first place. They’ve never done it quite as successfully as they have here on Girls in Peacetime Want to Dance. Opener “Nobody’s Empire,” with its marching beat, glowing synths and gospel choir backup vocals comes off like a statement of purpose: This will be a richly produced pop album (courtesy of Ben H. Allen III, who’s worked both with the indie-pop elite and hip-hop artists), so gear up. The band comes up with one of its most radio-ready singles to date on “The Party Line,” a disco-rock track with typically clever lyrics and a booming synth riff that won’t quit. The best Stevie Jackson-led song in years comes on the bittersweet beatnik funk of “Perfect Couples.” “Play for Today” is synthy and light, with ace guest vocals from Dum Dum Girls’ Dee Dee Penny. And it’s safe to say Belle & Sebastian have the only ABBA-esque synth-pop track that name-checks Sylvia Plath. But Belle & Sebastian want to do more than make us dance. Several tracks hue closer to their ’90s incarnation while still retaining the fuller production present on the album’s more immediate moments. The European folk-flavored “The Everlasting Muse” is rich with mandolin, horns and clap-along breakdowns. The slow-rolling, string-laden “Ever Had a Little Faith” is reminiscent of early B&S highlight “The Boys of Track and Field.” And Sarah Martin gets to sing lead on both the swoony “The Power of Three” and rollicking “The Book of You,” with some ripping guitarwork to boot. So it’s not the introverted Belle & Sebastian of yore. But this edition of Belle & Sebastian manages to help them evolve without losing what made them special. It’s a win-win for fans new and old, on one of Belle & Sebastian’s best albums in years.

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