Amoeblog

El Cantante - The Hector Lavoe Made for Television Story

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, July 13, 2007 02:29am | Post a Comment
el cantante
Thanks to director Leon Ichaso, I got to see an advance screening of the film El Cantante. Ichaso found out that I’m a huge Hector Lavoe fan, so he invited me to see the film. To me, the Willie Colon albums with Hector Lavoe singing rank up there with such albums as Sgt. Pepper’s, Pet Sounds, What’s Going On?, Innervisions, London Calling, Straight Outta Compton, Nevermind & Low End Theory. They are that good.

Lavoe’s story is legendary. His voice captivated a generation and pushed Salsa into the forefront. In the Fania Records heyday, the artists were filling up concert halls all over the world, including selling out Yankee Stadium. There were many talented musicians that were responsible for making Fania a giant in the record business, but Hector was Fania’s rock star. With that came his tragic rock star life.

In the movie, Marc Anthony has the daunting task of playing Hector Lavoe. For not being a Marc Anthony fan I think he does adequate job of it. During the film, especially during the live sequences, it's easy to forget Marc isn’t Hector. The same cannot be said about J-Lo. Jennifer Lopez plays the part of Lavoe’s wife, Puchi, and she never stops being J-Lo, perhaps her biggest downfall as an actress. There are very few moments when she slips out of the J-Lo role and is somewhat believable. Most of the film is done as a narrative from Jo-Lo’s character's point of view, a la a Behind The Music piece. It would have been better to skip that all together and perhaps develop a better script that gave the characters more depth. The rest of the cast is only serviceable, just enough to keep the story moving along. Besides the script never allowing the supporting cast room to develop, it never showed the development of the revolutionary style of music called Salsa. The way the film portrayed the origins of Salsa was as if the style developed overnight. rather than showing it was music that developed through time. The movie's pace seemed better suited for a T.V. movie. I wanted more from this movie than it could ever give me. levoe

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klaxons at great american music hall

Posted by Brad Schelden, July 12, 2007 07:05pm | Post a Comment

So last night I finally go to see the Klaxons live. I refuse to go to popscene, so I had to wait for them to play a real show. They played at the Great American Music Hall. Not exactly where I expected to see them, but I do love it there. I have seen some amazing shows there and always love to look at the great architecture and ceiling. Curt actually told me that he would love to be the persong who paints those ceilings, at least in his next life. However, I don't think I could handle being suspended from the ceiling like that. We eventually scored some seats in the upstairs area usually reserved for people eating dinner. But I think I only saw one person eating dinner last night. It is kind of a weird thing to eat while a band is playing. Isn't that what you do before you go to a show? Dinner theater is one thing or maybe eating during a 3 hour Celine Dion performance. But not during the Klaxons. Last night was also the night of mistaken identities. Curt swore he saw my coworker Margo upstairs. But I didn't think it was her until we went upstairs to investigate and I saw her tattoo. But right in front of me, I swear I saw another coworker Nick, who also happens to look like one of the guys in Chromeo. But as soon as he turned around, probably cause I was staring at him, I realized it was not him. We did get some good people watching in, once we got our seats upstairs.






Opening up for the Klaxons was Fist Fite. We planned on missing them but ended up getting there early since we only live a couple blocks away Another reason that I love the Great American Music Hall.  But they ended up being awesome. Like a mix between the Gossip and the Lost Sounds. They are from Portland and really just the kind of band I think of when I think of Portland. The singer sang the entire show through a telephone. But she had trouble balancing the phone between her head and shoulder while playing keyboards. So she eventually got someone from the audience to help her tape it to her head. They had really great stage energy and played super fun loud music. Both bands actually made comments about San Francisco audiences being better than L.A. And I have to agree. I have been to many L.A. shows and they just don't dance or get excited down there as much as up here. I am really glad we got there early to see them. They currently don't have a CD out but I will be patiently waiting for one.

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NEW HIP-HOP LIT: BRONX BIANNUAL No. 2

Posted by Billyjam, July 12, 2007 11:35am | Post a Comment

The recently published Bronx Biannual Issue No. 2 (Akashic Books) is the sophomore publication in the ongoing new ten-part black literary series that was founded and is edited by Bronx born and bred hip-hop journalist//author Miles Marshall Lewis. The 230-page collection boasts over a dozen talented hip-hop generation writers, both known and unknown, all carefully selected by Lewis, who began his hip-hop journalism career back in the early nineties working on the first edition of Vibe magazine as an intern. From there, he worked his way up to become that magazine's editor. He has also been editor at XXL and written for numerous publications including LA Weekly, Rolling Stone, Village Voice, and Essence.

A few years ago he published his first book, Scars of the Soul Are Why Kids Wear Bandages When They Don't Have Bruises, and last year kicked off the Bronx Biannual literary series.

I recently caught up with Miles, who splits his time between New York and Paris these days. I also caught up with one of Bronx Biannual's contributors -- noted hip-hop journalist and author Michael A. Gonzales, who co-wrote the groundbreaking hip-hop book Bring the Noise: A Guide: A Guide to Rap Music and Hip-Hop Culture (Crown, 1991) and has written stories and reviews for Spin, High Times, Mode, XXL, The Village Voice and Entertainment Weekly. He penned the piece "Blues For Sister Rose" in Bronx Biannual No. 2.

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The First Nudie Musical

Posted by phil blankenship, July 12, 2007 01:18am | Post a Comment
 





Edde Entertainment ED0018

Heavenly Bodies

Posted by phil blankenship, July 11, 2007 08:59pm | Post a Comment
 



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