Amoeblog

BAY AREA GUERILLA BROADCASTERS TAKE UP RESIDENCY IN NYC

Posted by Billyjam, March 13, 2008 10:54pm | Post a Comment

The Bay Area's NPR (Neighborhood Public Radio) is currently broadcasting in New York City as part of the Whitney Biennial 2008 and will be there through early June.  During this time they are broadcasting, doing live concert events, and holding workshops. For more information check out Neighborhood Public Radio's website or the Conceptual Art website.

I recently visited Lee Montgomery and Jon Brumit
(pictured L to R holding one of their NPI boxes) to talk about their current exhibit "American Life" on Madison Avenue, a few doors down from the Whitney Museum.

AMOEBLOG: Can you explain the set-up in New York City for those you are not able to visit you at this location?

JON/NPR: We have a broadcast booth in the front window and the door is unlocked (during all broadcasts) and a signup sheet so that people from the neighborhood or visiting the museum (Whitney) can come in and sign up on the sign up sheet to do a show, tell stories, interview people.

AMOEBLOG: And how many hours a day/week are you broadcasting exactly?

LEE/NPR: We are broadcasting 24/7, though sometimes it's just the sound of the pedestrian and automotive traffic outside our window.  New stuff can be heard Thursday through Sunday.  Wednesday we keep office hours, and sometimes use the time to broadcast experimentally and spontaneously
improvisationally or to invite insistent newcomers on the air.  You just never know what'll happen.

AMOEBLOG: What is the one thing you would like to get out of the NY installation?
 
LEE/NPR: One thing, hmm? I think we never are inclined to be so goal oriented, but I will say that any positive effect we can have on people's attitudes toward ideas of free speech, and any critical stance we can foster towards media analysis will be considered a success.  Beyond that, it would be awesome to see new relationships forged between people in the museum, and in the community, and new connections (two ways) made between average people and the art world.. We love the fact that no one ever has to pay to access our work in this show..even if we are way up on Madison Ave.
 
AMOEBLOG: How is it going so far and what interesting things have happened or who has shown up to check out the NYC installation?

LEE/NPR
:
It's been crazy fun. Of note, we have had a visit from a bitter, fired ex-NPR (National Public Radio) reporter, a current NPR reporter, a WNYC producer, two National NPR trustees, a woman retired from the National NPR's general counsel's office, Anabella Sciorra, and the accountant for The Who, The Stones, Monty Python and Uriah Heap, and his very dynamic and charming wife.  Additionally, we have had students and children from the neighborhood, The Enablers, EDAS, Daniel Goode, Scott Rifkin, and friends from San Francisco talking with artists in New York and talking about a protest against the Detourned Menu art show at the ISE in SOHO.  The museum has been brilliantly supportive (if sometimes a bit nervous) throughout, and we have been surprised and pleased by the diversity of guests and points of view on display.

The Employee Interview Part XVII: Andrew Lux

Posted by Miss Ess, March 13, 2008 02:54pm | Post a Comment
Andrew Lux
3 years employment
Man About Amoeba



ME: So, what brought you to Amoeba?  How did you end up working here?

AL: I've wanted to work at Amoeba ever since it opened. It's basically been my dream job forever. I remember in high school my girlfriend at the time would have to drag me ouaerial pinkt of the store. Umm... but yeah, I got the job here cause somehow one of my good friends, Jessica, was working at Amoeba, and I had told her about how I love the store, and I really needed a job because I had just gotten kicked off disability, so Jessica called me on the day someone got fired. So I ran down to the store and filled out an application and met one of the managers and next thing I know I'm being interviewed and I'm behind the counter-- crazy right?

ME: Timing is everything!  Ah, I didn't know you and Jessica were friends before you worked here!  Cool.  So what song describes your life perfectly right now?

AL: Man that's a hard one... Umm "Interesting Results" by Ariel Pink cause I have been writing a lot of songs, or trying to at least, and that song really sums up the creative process. Now I just need to think about what song out there deals with buying a new computer... hmm...

Ah yes, my good
microphones mt eerie cover friend Ariel Pink!  If you could trade places with any musician, dead or alive, who would it be and why?

The Demons

Posted by phil blankenship, March 13, 2008 01:34pm | Post a Comment
 





Premiere Entertainment International

(In which foul language is used.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 12, 2008 10:02pm | Post a Comment

The author being bullied into gambling. Note the excitement in his face. Note the sarcasm in the previous sentence.

Day two of Las Vegas saw Corey and I doing one of our favorite things: nothing.

After a breakfast of oatmeal so slimy you’d think it was an accessory for your Castle Greyskull play-set…





…we returned to the artificial beach that had been so typhoony the day before. This time it was sunny, sparkling, and crowded. Tacky house music blasted from every nook and cranny, making each action seem like a dull outtake from a beer commercial. We took refuge near a waterfall, which helped to drown out the incessant oomph – oomph – oomph

One feature I totally had a crush on was this thing they called the Lazy River, which was a stretch of pool that ran in a winding loop, with a strong current that was propelled by machines (or black magic – I didn’t actually ask). You get in this thing and you’re gently swept along with little physical effort. I decided then and there, if I’m ever a billionaire, I would buy myself a Lazy River. Then, dear reader, you and I could dive and splash and play all day, and no one could tell us to stop, because we’d just ride the current far away – safe from harm, from the voices, from the voices in our heads that tell us to kill.

Amidst all this carefree luxury, there grew in me a fear, tightening its grip, as hours past and evening drew near. You see, we had tickets to…


Cirque du Soleil.


Now, I had never seen a Cirque show, but I’d never let that stand in my way of judging them harshly. You have to keep a closed mind about things, right?

John Buttera 1939 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, March 12, 2008 09:46pm | Post a Comment

I just discovered that "Li'l John" Buttera, legendary street rod and funny car master builder died on March 2nd due to complications from brain cancer at age 68. His death came just four days after that of his fellow hotrod builder Boyd Coddington.

John Buttera was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin in 1939 and began building dragsters there as a kid. A chance meeting with another racing legend, Mickey Thompson, led to his moving to Southern California in the late 1960s, where he worked on, among other things, Thompson's World Land Speed Record streamliner.

The trend setting Buttera went on to build and design almost every type of racing vehicle in the motor world, from street rods to dragsters, funny cars and Pro Stock machines, even customized motorcycles. After he opened his own chassis shop in Cerritos, Buttera’s skills led to working with many of the greats in those halcyon days of drag racing in the 1960s and 70s, including Don "The Snake" Prudhomme, Tom "the Mongoose" McEwen, Shirley Muldowney and Don Schumacher. His Funny Cars were lightening fast pieces of art, with their sleekly elegant and simple lines, suspended low in a beautifully wicked stance. And they also won championships.

Buttera’s stellar reputation as a builder of street rods began in about 1974 when he redesigned a 1926 Tall T Ford, it would be the first in a long series of influential cars. His subtle craftsmanship and superior engineering skills were unmatched. Buttera’s rods like his white ’29 roadster, John Corno’s ’32 roadster (that won the 1980 Oakland America’s Most Beautiful Roadster award), and his ’33 Willy’s model 77, were in a class by themselves, constantly thrilling hot rod enthusiasts. He is credited as being the first to carve customized parts for street rods, race cars and motorcycles from solid chunks of billet aluminum.

BACK  <<  1560  1561  1562  1563  1564  1565  1566  1567  1568  1569  1570  1571  >>  NEXT