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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Avant-Garde Composer Nils Frahm

Posted by Amoebite, February 24, 2015 05:00pm | Post a Comment

Nils Frahm

Nils Frahm is a Berlin-based Avant-Garde composer and pianist known for his Nils Frahm Spacesunconventional approach to Classical piano. Frahm creates a unique style of classical and Jazz-influenced electronic music by utilizing a grand piano, upright piano, Juno 60 keyboard, Rhodes and a drum machine.

Frahm has gained recognition for his trance-inducing live shows where he's known for painstakingly sustaining notes over a long period of time. On his tenth studio release, Spaces (Erased Tapes), Frahm delivers layers of atmospheric sonics while displaying his ability to create meticulous compositions. Many of his pieces paint broad pictures and can easily be used as film score. Nil Frahm's work satisfies Jazz listeners, electronic fans and those who enjoy avant-garde. Spaces does not disappoint.   

Nils Frahm dropped by Amoeba Hollywood recently and picked up some choice vinyl from our Jazz Room. Once Nils starts talking about albums, it's clear he is a true connoisseur who takes his record collecting very seriously. He also explains the importance of being patient when hunting for harder-to-find records. A huge fan of classic Jazz, Nils finds a copy of Billie Holiday's Songs For Distingue Lovers. He follows that up with another rare copy of Thelonious Monk's Thelonious Himself. Frahm finds some amazing records and his genuine appreciation for Jazz makes you want to fire up the record player and chill out to some Miles Davis or John Coltrane.

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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: Public Enemy's "It Takes A Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back"

Posted by Billyjam, February 24, 2015 02:01pm | Post a Comment
public enemy it takes a nation of millions to hold us backBack in April 1988 Public Enemy (PE) released the classic album It Takes A Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back on Def Jam Recordings. And prove that it's a classic is the fact that  27 full years later Nation still packs the same punch it did when it was initially unleashed on the world back in the late eighties. Widely considered the Strong Island (aka Long Island, New York) crew's greatest work ever, It Takes A Nation... was not only one of PE's finest moments, but hip-hop's as well. Released during the much lamented "golden" era of hip-hop, the album, which was the follow up to PE's 1987 debut Yo! Bum Rush the Show, defied the stereotypical "sophomore slump" that so many artists suffered from.

PE's debut was an excellent hip-hop album but this sequel simply blew it away since it was a jaw-droppingly amazing album (of any genre) in every way. Production-wise, it was so richly layered and hardcore that it just grabbed you and didn't let go. Chuck D's militant and thought-provoking, in-your-face revolutionary lyrical flow was so powerful it scared some people. But mostly it won over new fans who still thought of rap as some fad or disposable urban pop. Combined, all the elements of Nation made up an album that was unlike anything heard in hip-hop, or any music, up to that point. I remember that summer of '88 in the Bay Area hearing it blasting everywhere I went in every type of neighborhood. I had never experienced that before!

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Album Picks: Colleen Green, Torche, THEESatisfaction

Posted by Billy Gil, February 24, 2015 10:55am | Post a Comment

Colleen Green - I Want to Grow Up

Colleen Green I want to grow up lpColleen Green details major life upsets as she faces the end of her 30s on her new album, I Want to Grow Up. From breakups to digitally addled attention spans, Green’s power-pop panache makes quarterlife crises go down smoothly on hooky songs like “Pay Attention” and girl-groupish “Wild One.” “I’m so sick of being self-absorbed,” Green sings on the title track, yet she’s so good at communicating that sense of staring at the ceiling and chastising yourself that we can’t help but be hooked on her particular brand of sugary anxiety. She writes a catchy ode to getting clean and going to bed early with “Things That Are Bad for Me” and then follows it up with another track about wanting to get fucked up on the drone-rocking “part 2,” summing up a sentiment on this album we can all relate to: I’m gonna get it together, maybe tomorrow. Read more about I Want to Grow Up in our interview with Green here. See her live at Amoeba Hollywood today at 7 p.m.!

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15 American Pop Hits That Aren't in English

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 23, 2015 10:00pm | Post a Comment
In the United States there is no official language and in roughly 18% of American homes, one of hundreds of languages other than English is primarily spoken -- all of which, unless they're indigenousshould be considered "foreign languages." In Los Angeles, everyday you can hear pop songs on the radio in Cantonese, English, Farsi, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Spanish, and Vietnamese and although I often find that pop music is better when the lyrics are unintelligible, only a handful of pop songs in a language other than English have made the journey onto the pop charts -- here are fifteen (or so).


Harry Choates - Jole Blon



Harry Choates's "Jole Blon" (1946, French


Colleen Green Talks Growing Up and Turning 30 Before Amoeba Performance

Posted by Billy Gil, February 23, 2015 10:44am | Post a Comment

colleen green amoebaMuch has been made of the mid-life crisis, but Colleen Green details the kind of quarter-life crisis that happens in your late 20s on her new album, I Want to Grow Up. Over fizzy power-pop chords and purring solos, Green’s girlish coo is so sweet you almost miss the hungover, self-flagellating lyrics that fill I Want to Grow Up—“I’m sick of being immature … I think I need a schedule,” she confesses on the title track. But I Want to Grow Up is also a lot of fun, as Green doesn’t take herself so seriously, writing odes to TV and her lack of an attention span that are as funny as they are self-critical. Even in the admonishing “Things That Are Bad For Me (Part 1),” Green admits in part two, “I wanna do drugs right now/I wanna get fucked up, I don’t care how.”

Green talked to us a bit about her new album before her show at Amoeba Hollywood Feb. 24 at 7 p.m.

The songs on I Want to Grow Up really hold together as an album because there’s an inward quality to them, for the most part. Did you write them kind of all at once in a certain frame of mind or were they written more slowly?

They were kind of written over the course of a few years. They started out primarily as ideas that I thought about for a long time before I tried to sit down and make music out of them. Once I got to that stage where I was like OK, I need to record this and get this done, it all kind of materialized as a set kind of well.

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