Amoeblog

Oasis Of The Zombies

Posted by phil blankenship, March 31, 2008 07:47pm | Post a Comment
 



Filmland

WWTarkovskyD? Editing Reality

Posted by Charles Reece, March 31, 2008 11:54am | Post a Comment
This interview with Orson Welles by New Wave assistant director and Cahiers critic Charles Bitsch and film critic André Bazin reminded me of why The Bourne Ultimatum won the Oscar for editing this year:

For me, almost everything that is called mise en scène is a big joke. In the cinema, there are very few people who are really metteurs-en-scène; there are very few who have ever had the opportunity to direct. The only mise en scène of real importance is practiced in the editing. I needed nine months to edit Citizen Kane, six days a week. Yes, I edited [The Magnificent] Ambersons, despite the fact that there were scenes not by me, but my editing was modified. The basic editing is mine and, when a scene of the film holds together, it is because I edited it. In other words, everything happens as if a man painted a picture: he finishes it and someone comes to do the touch up, but he cannot of course add paint all over the surface of the canvas. I worked months and months on the editing of Ambersons before it was taken away from me: all this work is thus there, on the screen. But for my style, for my vision of cinema, the editing is not one aspect, it is the aspect. Directing is an invention of people like you; it is not an art, or at most an art for a minute a day. This minute is terribly crucial, but it happens only very rarely. The only moment where one can exercise any control over a film is in the editing. But in the editing room, I work very slowly, which always unleashes the temper of the producers who snatch the film from my hands. I don’t know why it takes me so much time: I could work forever on the editing of a film. For me, the strip of celluloid is put together like a musical score, and this execution is determined by the editing; just like a conductor interprets a piece of music in rubato, another will play it in a very dry and academic manner and a third will be very romantic, and so on. The images themselves are not sufficient: they are very important, but are only images. The essential is the length of each image, what follows each image: it is the very eloquence of the cinema that is constructed in the editing room.

PETE ROCK @ AMOEBA TONIGHT & OTHER NEWS BITS

Posted by Billyjam, March 31, 2008 08:13am | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music Hollywood has one highly recommended free instore performance today when producer/remixer/rapper and hip-hop legend Pete Rock graces the stage of the 6400 Sunset Blvd store at 7PM for a free show. For full details on the Mt. Vernon, NY hip-hop great, whose new joint is the appropriately titled NY's Finest -- a guest-heavy production that among others includes Wu Tang Clan's Raekwon and Masta Killa.  Check out the insightful, in-depth bio on Pete Rock (including his influential years with musical partner CL Smooth, with whom he recorded one of hip-hop's greatest songs -- the classic "T.R.O.Y." -- among others) elsewhere on the Amoeba website by clicking here

Remember tonight's Hollywood Amoeba instore starts at 7PM sharp so get there on time if you are planning on heading over.  Meantime check out the electronic press kit video of NY's Finest below.



Another new hip-hop full-length release and one that I highly recommend is Questolous by longtime San Francisco turntablist DJ Quest of the Bulletproof Scratch Hamster/Space Travelers and Live Human fame who tomorrow (April 1st) drops this, his first solo album since he dropped Questside seven years ago.  Questolous is an amazing hip-hop album, rich with scratch mastery from the pioneering Bay Area scratchmaster Quest plus his numerous guests including DJ Marz (Space Travelers), DJ Vandal, Oaty Love, Dawgshit, and DJ T-Rock, who each add either scratching or production to the sixteen track offering that also features the three Bay Area emcees Luke Sick, Bas-One, and Eddie K, each on their own tracks.  If you love hip-hop but have gotten sick of much of what passes for hip-hop in recent years, this is an album you should really like.

Obi 1

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 30, 2008 11:05pm | Post a Comment
The art of the Japanese Obi strip has always held a special spot in my heart.  I remember visiting a bandmate's house back in 1989 and getting a peek into his older, cooler brother's bedroom.  He was a musician who had reputedly jammed a bit with Caterwaul;  I was very impressed!  On his walls, in shiny import bags, were dozens of Japanese issue LPs with Obi strips, a sight I'd never seen before.  For me, the obi is like cool neon on a bar front.  It's an enticing advertisement- promising something exotic, cryptic and sexy.  Even if it is just an 80's Elton John record... something which, in reality, is none of the above.  The Obi is meant to be disposable, hence the flimsy design. That's why the people who covet Japanese issues pay so much more for certain LP's with intact Obis.  Older LP's are especially difficult to find with the Obis intact.  Anyhow, here's a two parter for you, all from a recently priced out collection- some of which are currently hanging on our walls or awaiting for you in our vinyl bins...



A popular Obi design uses a band photo or artist head shot. These are often used on later press runs when an artist has a body of work, all of which can be adorned with the same band/artist image.

Blade Of The Ripper

Posted by phil blankenship, March 30, 2008 08:01pm | Post a Comment
 



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