Amoeblog

The Neighborhood Mix Continues

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, April 26, 2008 01:21pm | Post a Comment
Last week at Footsie's was so fun I'm doing it again. This week we will be joined by DJ Kazue (The Standard//Soul People) She is one solid DJ, Deep Soul, Funk, Hip-Hop. I will counter with some African Funk, Cumbia and great Latin Funk I found this week. Together we will produce some great sounds for a Sunday evening. Come by, have a drink and show some love. Starts @ 9:30!

Crystal Force

Posted by phil blankenship, April 26, 2008 11:23am | Post a Comment
 



Vista Street Entertainment

In Memory Of DJ Dusk

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, April 26, 2008 11:14am | Post a Comment

Back in 2000, when I used to perform at The Temple Bar on a regular basis, DJ Dusk was the resident DJ. I knew him as one of the Root Down DJ's and I heard him spin funk, hip-hop & reggae. On those Temple Bar nights when East L.A. would invade Santa Monica, he would unload the best Salsa, Cumbia and Latin Funk Jams. I figured with with his dark features, musical tastes and his command of Spanish slang that this his was one of us. Turned out he was born Tarek Habib Captan, son of a Lebanese father and a German/Irish mother. I wasn't the only one fooled. In an article in Los Angeles City Beat Magazine, close friend and Root Down co-founder Carlos "Loslito" Guaico didn't know either:

"For the longest time I was convinced he was a Puerto Rican from New York. Not just because of his smooth-operator and accent status, but for his understanding, love, and education for all types of music from hip-hop to house, funk, soul, reggae, and salsa."

Two years later for those who knew him personally or knew him from the music he played, he is still missed very much. The DJ Dusk Art & Music festival is not as much an anniversary of his death as a celebration of his life. The festival is being held at The Mar Vista Family Center, a place where Dusk mentored hundreds of kids that passed through those doors over thirteen years. Also performing tomorrow will be East L.A.'s very own (and Amoeba employee) Ray Ricky Rivera with a full band.

Mad Money

Posted by phil blankenship, April 25, 2008 11:54pm | Post a Comment
I've seen lots of strange movie tie-ins, Lottery tickets for the
ill conceived heist comedy Mad Money are a good example.




In equally horrifying news, Fangoria's Weekend of Horror
is happening this weekend in Los Angeles.
For more information, click HERE.

Jimi Hendrix (1973)

Posted by Miss Ess, April 25, 2008 05:35pm | Post a Comment
jimi hendrix
If you are a gigantic music fan, you've probably already listened to and absorbed Jimi Hendrix' music to the point where you might think you never ever need to hear it again.  I know the feeling-- when I was in high school Jimi was one of the primary artists I listened to, over and over and over again to the point of oblivion.

So to you, the jaded, I say, hold up!  Just when you think you've seen and heard everything (and maybe you have, but this was new to me...), here comes the fairly recent reissue of the 1973 documentary Jimi Hendrix, which was directed by Joe Boyd, John Head III and Gary Weis.  I read about it in Joe Boyd's White Bicycles, and finally got my hands on a copy of the movie. 

Producer extraordinaire Boyd was heartbroken by the bumps that came along with putting together this film.  One thing he was dead on about, and what really makes this film compelling above all others about Hendrix, is that the interviews were conducted only 3 years after Hendrix' death, and both his contradictory and brilliant presence and the awe he inspired in his fellow musicians is extremely palpable.  Heck, you can see it written all over Eric Clapton and Pete Townshend's still-freaked-out faces! 

And then there are the girlfriends, so many of them.  The one that stands out is Fayne Pridgon, who hejimi hendrix soundtrack cover met in Harlem and dated throughout the sixties.  She's quite the feisty gal, and her stories about Hendrix are hilarious-- her manner of speaking is unnervingly similar to Jimi's.  Her mother had a heavy love/hate relationship with Hendrix, which Fayne details in alternatively sad and silly tales.  She remembers wide-eyed Jimi bringing home a Dylan record and flipping out that she tried to leave the room to go to the bathroom during one of the songs, nearly missing the best part!  She also tells a great story about being on the subway with Jimi and their cats, who got loose.

Roadies and managers are also interviewed, folks I had never seen in other documentaries.  Their memories are fresh:  a roadie recalls having to stand behind the amps and hold them up while Jimi humped and flailed away on the front of the Marshall stack; a manager remembers landing in London in 1970 to a pack of paparazzi and moving aside, only to have his arm firmly grabbed by still-shy Jimi, who didn't want to be left alone with the press.

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