Sorry To Tell You This, But Old Age Begins at 27

Posted by Whitmore, March 22, 2009 02:16pm | Post a Comment
Yeah, you may look pretty good, maybe even damn near perfect … downright delicious, but I bet that chunk of gray pork in your head is already showing signs of some serious sluggishness, if not just complete, profound rot.
In a recent study of more than 2,000 people between the ages of 18 to 60 published in the latest edition of the journal Neurobiology of Aging, scientists found that on average cognitive abilities were best and sharpest at age 22. The study conducted at the Salthouse Cognitive Aging Lab at the University of Virginia has shown that cognitive abilities may decline much earlier than previously thought. Head of the study, Professor Timothy Salthouse, found indications that there was a marked decline in brain functions like reasoning, speed of thought and spatial visualization by the age of 27. Other tests also show memory performance begins faltering around 37 years of age. However, and this is slightly odd, the study finds that with more long term accumulated knowledge, vocabularies actually increased until about the age of 60. For example, my mom can say “you’re full of shit” in six different languages.

In Salthouse's study, participants were asked to solve puzzles, recall story details and spot patterns in letters and symbols -- similar testing is used to detect dementia. Salthouse states the difference between this study and comparable research is that other tests could not uncover signs of cognitive decline; older testing methods did not account for prior test experience. Common knowledge-type tests tend to give middle-aged participants an advantage.
Whew! This study eased many of my worries. In my youth I once showed some promise, but then in my late 20’s something inexplicably flattened my quasi-whiz kid, semi-demi-brilliant, slightly better then OK, B-minus intellect. Now I know I was just an innocent victim of natural brain chemistry decline … outstanding!

'BS' Doesn't Stand for 'Battlestar': Battlestar Galactica Finale

Posted by Charles Reece, March 22, 2009 12:44am | Post a Comment
spoiler alert.

You know how after a catastrophic accident or tragedy some religiously inclined individual looks at it as a miracle that something even worse didn't happen? Say, some burglar botches a job, not realizing the family is still home, and winds up murdering all of them except the young daughter he didn't see hiding in the closet. Afterwards, some bozo will inevitably suggest God's light must be shining down on the little girl, since she was so lucky to have survived. Maybe I'm a glass-half-empty kind of guy, but I'd say what's being conveniently ignored there is that her entire family was slaughtered, indicating there ain't anything moral giving much of a shit about her wellbeing. Or, if you don't like hypotheticals, take the Hulkster's use of Divine Intervention to comfort his son, Nick, during the latter's stay in jail for a drunken crash that rendered his "best friend" and passenger, John Graziano, a tomato:

Well, I don't know what type of person John was or what he did to get himself in this situation. I know he was pretty aggressive and used yell at people and used to do stuff. And for some reason God laid some heavy shit on that kid.  I don't know what he was into .... John was a negative person.

Forsooth, God's Will is deep and mysterious! So say we all! Thus, how might the 30 or so thousand survivors of Caprica find a little bit of meaning in their civiliation's destruction at the hands of the Cylons? Well, by realizing it's all part of God's plan (that is, the one, true God, not "the gods" the humans always swear by). See, with old Yahweh not being much of a utilitarian, it was necessary to kill so many to get a few to Earth, as a way to help our ancestors along in their development.  This is the Divine Scenarist's way of getting humanity to realize its full potential as what Caprica 6 refers to as another iteration of the civilization that gets too big for its britches and will destroy itself with nukes.

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TK Label Gallery

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 22, 2009 12:01am | Post a Comment
dash records yellow label get off roxy lp labelt.k. records kc and the sunshine band custom labelalston records gold label betty wright
dash record label apa record label hot bushglades green label timmy thomas
foxy get off dash records bird labellester radio corporation records label b. baker chocolate co.glades record label latimore
anita ward songs of love juana records sky label designchimneyville record labelfrederick knight knight kap juana white label
peter brown a fantasy love affair drive record labelbobby caldwell clouds record labelmarlin disco party label
T.K. and its many subsidiaries were a very tangled web indeed. A huge player in the early disco scene, Henry Stone and co. burned out quick-- by 1980 they had to sell out to Morris Levy. I think my favorite design is the Chimneyville label; I really loved collecting these...
sunshine sound inner sleevet.k. disco 12" sleevemarlin records inner sleeve
jimmy bo horne goin' home for love sunshine sound record labelblowfly rapp dirty t.k. disco labelt.k. label purple and pink
jimmy reed is back roots record labeltk black rainbow label

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Jenny Lewis

Posted by Amoebite, March 21, 2009 08:37pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

 Jenny Lewis
Day #5 - Artist #5 - Jenny Lewis:
Jenny Lewis
To indie rock girls everywhere, she is an inspiration. To indie rock boys, she is an infatuation. Jenny Lewis has become the first lady of indie rock throughout the decade by being the go-to female vocalist for collabortations across the indie spectrum...and by being so damn cute!

The bulk of her accolades have come from fronting the band Rilo Kiley, her flagship musical endeavor that began with their 2001 debut album, Take-Offs and Landings. They've continued to record and tour recently with their fourth album and major label debut, Under the Blacklight, which came out in 2007.

Rilo Kiley - "The Moneymaker" from Under the Blacklight (2007):

Jenny's most well known musical collaboration is probaJenny Lewis Postal Service Albumbly the one she's least known for being a part of. She contributed backing vocals for most of the 2003 album Give Up by The Postal Service. According to Wikipedia, this side project by Death Cab For Cutie frontman Ben Gibbard and Jimmy Tamborello was the most successful selling album for legendary indie label Sup Pop since Nirvana's Bleach in 1989, selling over 900,000 copies. And keep in mind, this was still two years before Death Cab For Cutie blew up in the mainstream with their album Plans (2005).

Arp's Alexis Georgopoulos Chats

Posted by Miss Ess, March 21, 2009 06:15pm | Post a Comment
Alexis Georgopoulos has been a creative force in the San Francisco scene for many years, first making music with the band Tussle and then in his current incarnation, Arp. Arp's release In Light is a textural and warmth-exuding record that has added something new and welcome to the electronica section of Amoeba. Recently Alexis packed it up and moved to New York City where he plans to continue composing his balmy and atmospheric tunes while also working on a multitude of other projects, notably within the gallery scene there. Here, Alexis chats about those projects, his work in Arp, and also details what we can assume are just a few of his myriad influences and inspirations.

alexis georgeopoulos, arp

Miss Ess: How did you come up with your sound for Arp? What was your vision?

Alexis: After leaving Tussle, I started experimenting with analog synthesizers. Initally, Matthew Higgs (curator of White Columns gallery in Manhattan) asked if I'd do an installation for an exhibit he was putting together at New Langton Center for the Arts. When I learned it was a collaboration with an architect, I realized the music I'd justarp in light started making with analog synthesizers might work really well. So the first public Arp project, Cloud, was a modular room on wheels set up with a featherbed (just large enough for two people to lie down on or three to sit), two speakers and a few of my musical pieces on infinite repeat. I took the gallerists' sanity into consideration by picking pieces that I hoped could be heard again and again without driving them crazy.

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