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Freedy Johnston's 'Perfect' Pop Gem: I'll Buy THAT for a dollar!

Posted by Mark Beaver, July 20, 2009 09:25pm | Post a Comment
freedy johnston this perfect world
Freedy Johnston
came out of Kansas and played around New York until he got signed by Bar/None Records, who released his debut, Trouble Tree in 1990. Trouble Tree was well received, but it was 1992's Can You Fly that got Johnston's name and songs bouncing all around college radio.

I've always thought of Freedy Johnston as the lost member of the Db's. He has a pristine pop quality to his voice and the stories he writes have the same almost-too-clever and slightly melancholic take on relationships that made the Db's' Amplifier the deservedly huge college rock classic that it became.

In 1994 I was working at SF's Reckless Records of London, an arguably cool and decidedly tiny record store on upper Haight St. As always, I was listening to anything I could get my hands on. Johnston's This Perfect World happened across the counter and stopped me in my tracks just by the power of its sheer completeness.

Produced by Butch Vig (Garbage) and featuring contributions from Graham Maby (Joe Jackson Band), Kevin Salem (Dumptruck), Marshall Crenshaw, Marc Ribot, Mark Spencer (Blood Oranges) and David Schramm, who worked repeatedly with the Db's' Chris Stamey and Peter Holsapple, This Perfect World is a perfect pop record. Most of it is deeply written, deeply produced and played rock-pop, though in places ("Gone Like the Water") it reveals Johnston's beloved folk-country roots. I've heard the criticism that Butch Vig sucked the edge out of it in the production, but I wasn't noticing that in 1994 and don't really notice it today, 15 years later, listening to it (still) from beginning to end.

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New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 07/24/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, July 20, 2009 06:07pm | Post a Comment
 

New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:

 

 

 

Redshape 
2010 EP 12"
78DSR

2010 is a deep techno journey into space. Synths swarm, distant sounds weave in and out of the tracks. "WHITE" sounds a bit more housey, but using clever edits and textures to keep it REDSHAPE style. EP closes with the cut "VIOLET," a warm electro/techno track.



Gold Panda
MIYAMAE EP 12"
VARS023

Three track EP from the hotly tipped GOLD PANDA, who takes a break from remixing LITTLE BOOTS, SMD, and BLOC PARTY to drop his debut artist EP on VARIOUS PRODUCTIONS. A mix of Japanese sounding techno with dubstep rhythms and house influenced basslines.  



The Moon missions and the children of Major Tom -- the end of the space age and the music that followed

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 20, 2009 03:58pm | Post a Comment
first moon landing

It's the 40th anniversary of the first manned moon landing, and looking back at that achievement it's obvious that one of the many repercussions was evinced in the music of the era. In addition to the space rock of bands like Pink Floyd and Hawkwind and sci-fi minded funk acts like Funkadelic, the glam rock scene, which exploded around the same time, is one of the most obvious manifestations. For a couple of years, glam rock was massively popular in several countries and it spawned hordes of mylar-and-make-up-wearing rockers singing about extraterrestrial love and lonely planet boys. On December 7, 1972, the Apollo 17 was the last manned mission to the moon and the space age, shortly after, seems to have drawn quietly to a close. Glam rock seemed to fizzle shortly afterward, but maybe it just went underground, seeking out new frontiers in a different set of clothes.



First, in 1973, David Bowie retired his extraterrestrial Ziggy Stardust and released Aladdin Sane. Although hardly a radical departure, it was famously hyped as "Ziggy goes to America" and represented Bowie's efforts to move in a new direction. Then, in early 1974, glam rock's creator Marc Bolan announced that "Glam rock is dead." His February release, Zinc Alloy and the Hidden Riders of Tomorrow - A Creamed Cage in August, was described by its creator as "cosmic soul." Bowie described his next direction as "plastic soul" shortly afterward. Glam's two most important stars seemed committed to moving on in spirit, if perhaps overstating the change in their music.

The Hitter

Posted by phil blankenship, July 20, 2009 03:39pm | Post a Comment
The Hitter starring Ron O'Neal  The Hitter directed by Christopher Leitch

The Hitter plot synopsis

Sony G0633

FCCLA tribute concert this thursday afternoon

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 20, 2009 11:45am | Post a Comment
Last month I posted about the First Congregation Church of Los Angeles and their enormous organs.  A few weeks have passed and I've not found the time to make it out there again, but I'll try this Thursday, July 23rd, as they're having a 10 player tribute to a long attending devotee. I believe that I had the pleasure of speaking to the man a while back; he had been coming for 50+ years and was a player himself. He explained to me and my Pal Joey a little about the layout of the organs and how they worked.  Anyhow, it should be a great concert and I think it's the last one for a few weeks, as the oragans are going to go through their annual tune-up for a while. Below I've included a blow-by-blow account of the behind the scenes action of the FCCLA Great Organs.

FCCLA
540 South Commonwealth Ave. (6th Street)
Los Angeles, CA
90020


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