Amoeblog

Canadian For 'Yes!': FM's prog clearance masterpiece

Posted by J. Mark Beaver, August 5, 2008 12:00am | Post a Comment
In a recent edition of the L.A. Weekly’s Ask a Mexican column, someone asked why it was that so many young Mexican kids seemed gaga for Morrissey. The columnist thought the better question was why so few children of the imperialists (white kids) weren’t as equally gaga about some of the excellent music made by Latino musicians. Granted, as I hear my neighbor drive up blasting his stereo beyond what could possibly be comfortable for him inside the nuclear heart of that volume, I have to admit that much of what he plays for the neighbors sounds pretty good. Not necessarily something I would run out and buy, but I was far from hating it.

What’s that got to do with Canada? Good question, but in some ways, it's obvious. Canada is the Mexico of the Great White North, dont’cha know? It has only been the fact of a more-or-less common language that has allowed the very few Canuck rockers to break USA radio charts that have so far. Neil Young, Bare Naked Ladies, Bryan Adams, Alanis Morissette, Steppenwolf, Rush, Leonard Cohen; there aren’t many that spring to mind and most of them are not in my personal collection, but they built careers with American money without being AmericaFM Black Noisen or British. Good job, guys!

So, trawling thru the Red Sea of Clearance, I happened upon an album cover that has haunted me since my childhood. The vacant stare of the half-man/half-mannequin surrounded by the glowing hoop and splash of light has taunted me from Clearance bins for as long as I can remember being conscious of music. “Now’s the time,” I declared and grabbed it.

FM's Black Noise was in Clearance due to some condition issues, but it was there and cheap, so I took it. FM formed in Toronto in 1976, and Black Noise is their first album, from 1977. I hear a lot of Fragile-era Yes in their sound, some Jean-Luc Ponty, a splash here and there of Jan Hammer and a lot of the prog that defined the reigning Canadian supergroup of the day, Rush.  Perhaps it was the curse of the also-rans, the stigma attached to coming later than first with any particular sound that kept FM from being heard, or maybe we had already filled our Canadian quota for 1977. I certainly don’t mean to give the impression that FM were copy-cats, by any means. There’s enough Buggles in their sound to tilt them towards what was becoming known as New Wave and a bit away from the pack of dyed-in-the-wool proggers. Their drive is provided by fuzzed guitar, virtuoso drums and the central wail of Nash the Slash’s electric violin.

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Men In White

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, August 4, 2008 10:35am | Post a Comment
Well, here they come...The men in the white suits...and sweaters and horses bodies and whatever the hell Menudo is wearing. Kinda looks like a karate uniform mixed with PJ's. Maybe that's what they had to wear for the band slumber parties...

Lionel Richie Dancing on the CeilingBrothers Johnson WinnersEonGerald Albright Bermuda Nights
Grateful Dead Gone To HeavenDickies Great DictationsPepe Villa and El Mariachi Mexico Honeymoon in MexicoRoger Daltrey Ride a Rock Horse
Latimore MoreJames Brown the Original Disco ManMenudo A Todo RockNick Heyward All Over the Weekend
Seals and Croft Takin' It EasyShawn Phillips SpacedTeddy Pendergrass It's Time For Love TPJames Brown the Original Disco Man
William Bell On A RollJermaine Jackson William Bell On A RollAl Green Trust In God

August 3, 2008

Posted by phil blankenship, August 3, 2008 11:44pm | Post a Comment
Midnight Meat Train movie ticket stub
Midnight Meat Train Norwalk Silver Super Saver Cinema Marquee

Midnight Meat Train Movie Theater Poster Case  Norwalk Silver Super Saver Cinema movie times

Midnight Meat Train movie ticket stub Norwalk Silver Super Saver Cinema

Midnight Meat Train movie theater mylar

Norwalk Silver Super Saver Cinema sign

Midnight Meat Train credits screen shot

Norwalk Silver Super Saver Cinema women's bathroom

 

TRAILER TRASH

Posted by Charles Reece, August 2, 2008 09:05pm | Post a Comment
In W., the third in Oliver Stone's trilogy of "you're expecting a leftist nut, but really I'm just another bourgeois liberal" films (following Nixon and World Trade Center), our current President gets Stone's patented humane treatment:


The majority of Stone's post-JFK work points to something I didn't initially realize about that one truly great film of his, namely that its frenzied, foaming at the mouth and forgetting to breathe conspiratorial style came from a humanistic fear. Similar to those racialist conspiracies of Atlantis and other myths of ancient white civilizations that are grounded in the fear that non-whites might've advanced technology and world culture, Stone doesn't want to accept that another human being might be so foreign to his own humanistic beliefs as to behave in a manner that would call into question his own humanistic worldview.  Thus, he needed to fantasize about the machinations of a Big Other in order to fit the evil that a common man might do and has done into his provincial ontology. This approach de-humanizes evil by making it always one-step removed from its practitioners. As with white racists not having to worry about "savage" technology -- being explained away as the result of their own mythological Aryan ancestors -- humanism is inoculated from evil, since it's always something else causing it, never humanity itself. Instead of looking at how we might be just like them, Oswald, Nixon, Castro, etc. are made to be just like us. Little wonder why Natural Born Killers was so hellbent on blaming the media. A little bit of Saint Augustine's worrying about his dirty thoughts would be good for Stone.

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Barcodes

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, August 2, 2008 02:55pm | Post a Comment
A late entry in the vinyl yesteryear was the barcode. When exactly did they start appearing on the back of album jackets? I'm not exactly sure myself, but it appears to have been very early in the 80's. I've seen copies of the 1st Dickies on original yellow vinyl with one, and that album is from 1979. It might be that they had old copies of the vinyl lying around and had to repress covers in the early 80's though. Sometimes certain records can be difficult to track because a company might press up a ton of covers while pressing smaller batches of the actual vinyl, or vice versa. Coltrane on Atlantic is notorious for that-- you'll see covers clearly printed in the mid 60's with 70's label designs and such. Anyhow, I digress...This is not a gallery of barcodes off of the actual albums; it's a collection of price tags, primarily from the 80's-90's...

meliss etheridge barcode price tag
JC PennyHarry Chapin Verities & Balderdash barcode price tagcure kiss me kiss me kiss me barcode pricetagdeath scream bloody gore barcode pricetaglamont dozier black bach barcode price tag
hellion ann boleyn barcode price taghollies another night barcode price tagjoan jett i love rock & roll barcode price tag k-mart runaways
steve perry street talk barcode price tag k-mart journeyjacksons victory barcode price tag michael jackson record towntarget lp barcode price tag
rolling stones steel wheels barcode price tag keith richards mick jaggerkenny rogers what about me? barcode pricetag k-martzia records barcode price tag
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