This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 8, 2009 12:20pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly!

The March / April calendar is now online:

Printed calendars will be in early this week! Now  we need your help to make sure they get seen - pick one up for yourself and a few for your friends!

Screenwriter Josh Olson, writer of the Oscar nominated script for David Cronenberg's 2005 film A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE, will be guest curator and will appear in person together with other special guests. The week kicks off with a screening of his A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE paired with Sam Peckinpah's STRAW DOGS, and then continues with a series of films selected by Mr. Olson.

From Josh Olson:

A couple years ago, I drove past the New Beverly, and came to a screeching halt in the rain when I saw they were showing a double feature of Straw Dogs and A History of Violence. I was flattered, honored, tickled, and half a dozen other things that felt pretty damn good, and I mentioned this event many times in many forums.

So, flash forward to this year, and I am now programming said theater for a week - the second week of March, to be precise.

There's no theme to the week, save "These are movies I love," and it's a weird, hodgepodge of stuff.

I'll be there to introduce them all, and, in some cases, to talk to some of the writers responsible for them.


Posted by Billyjam, March 8, 2009 05:00am | Post a Comment

Today, March 8th, is the day recognized every year as International Woman's Day (IWD). It is a major day of global celebration for the economic, political and social achievements of women. IWD began as a political event, with the annual event blended in the culture of many countries (primarily Russia, as well as other nations of the former Soviet bloc).

While In some cultures IWD has lost some of its political flavor and become simply an occasion for men to express their love or respect towards women (a la Valentines Day meets Mother's Day), in many more countries it has maintained its political/sociological edge, where issues pertaining specifically to women are discussed. This year is no exception, as the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has warned that the specific health-care needs of women are often ignored or insufficiently taken into account in war situations.

The ICRC points out, "In the world’s least developed countries, many of which are at war, women are 300 times more likely to die in childbirth or from pregnancy-related complications than in developed countries, according to UNICEF. While armed conflicts and other violence affect entire communities, women are particularly at risk of rape and other forms of sexual violence. Because of poor security conditions or because they have no means of transportation, it is often impossible for women to reach a health-care facility so as to give birth safely."

And in recognition of IWD, leaders from seven international organizations converged in New York this week for a 'Girl Power and Potential' reception with the event featuring a panel of speakers outlining the strategies and goals of the United Nations Interagency Task Force on Adolescent Girls. For more information click here.

All American Girls

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 7, 2009 01:00am | Post a Comment

Thanks to Chris Matthews for this brilliant find. The rather religious Sister Sledge might not have envisioned this group of gals when they named their album All American Girls but, after finding these photos stuffed inside of said LP, I must say there is something totally beautiful & appropriate about the pairing.

My Current Ten

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 6, 2009 09:47pm | Post a Comment

Diplo: Decent Work For Decent Pay (hip-hop)

   Madlib: Beat Konducta Vol. 5-6: A Tribute to... (hip-hop)

Señor Coconut: Coconut FM Legendary Latin Tunes (electronica)

88-keys: The Death of Adam (hip-hop)

Rodriguez: Cold Fact (rock)

Nightmares On Wax: Thought So... (electronica)

Delia Derbyshire - electronic music pioneer

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 6, 2009 07:33pm | Post a Comment
Delia Derbyshire

The Guardian once described Delia Derbyshire as “The unsung heroine of British electronic music,” seemingly implying that there are other heroines of British electronic music that are more widely… sung. I suppose there is Daphne Oram but the English never use less than three adjectives when one will suffice, so let’s just say that Delia Derbyshire is an unsung heroine of music. That she happens to have worked primarily in electronic music is secondary and that she was British shouldn't be held against her. She was a wizard and pioneer who, instead of guarding her magical abililties, eagerly shared her techniques and discoveries, but was stifled by the BBC’s draconian demands that their artists work and die in anonymity.

Delia was born in Coventry on May 5th, 1937. As a girl, she learned piano and violin and attended Barr's Hill School. She later attended college at Girton in Cambridge. After initially pursuing studies in math, she switched courses to music before graduation. After graduation, she began to look for work in the music field, quickly butting up against the deeply entrenched sexism of the field. In fact, in 1959, upon applying for a job at Decca, she was flatly told that their policy was to not hire women to work in the studios. The United Nations proved more diplomatic than the folks at Decca, and she worked there for a short while. Then she returned to England and found employment at the London-based music publisher, Boosey & Hawkes. She didn’t stay long.
In 1960, she was hired as a trainee studio manager at the BBC, working with the Radiophonic Workshop, then just a few years old. It was an organization charged with producing experimental incidental music and sound effects for the BBC Third Programme’s radio plays in cases where the normal orchestral score was deemed inappropriate. Her predecessors had included Harry Desmond Briscoe and Daphne Oram, two noted pioneers of electronic music and musique concrète.
Derbyshire came on board following Oram’s departure, as part of a group of young artists that also included Brian Hodgson and John Baker. Many of her initial pieces were collaborations with artist/playwright Barry Bermange. One such piece was 1964’s The Dreams, a sound collage of people describing their dreams with Derbyshire's electronic sounds.

Gradually, the Radiophonic Workshop began producing more music and sound effects for television than radio. One year earlier, in 1963, Derbyshire performed her mostly widely-heard work when given the score for Ron Grainer’s theme to a new science-fiction series, Doctor Who. Incorporating filters, tape loops and valve oscillators, she fashioned one of the most memorable pieces of electronic music ever, and one that's especially dear to Whovians. Grainer was so impressed he sought to give Derbyshire co-author credit but the BBC prevented it. Although officially uncredited, the popularity of the theme resulted in her employers giving her many other assignments and she ultimately produced over 200 pieces including noteworthy scores for Great Zoos of the World and Cyprian Queen. The BBC was, however, by no means entirely supportive of her work, rejecting many of her compositions, claiming they were too bizarre, “too lascivious for 11 year olds” and “too sophisticated for the BBC2 audience.”

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