Amoeblog

Imaginary Jukebox: Part 1

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 9, 2009 08:54am | Post a Comment

My friend Shin Miyata from Japan came to visit over the weekend. He wanted to go to a bar in East L.A. that he had never been to. After discussing a few that were "been there, done that" by Shin, we decided on a steakhouse/bar in Monterey Park called The Venice Room. We arrived just in time to hear someone sing a Karaoke version of Eric Clapton’s “Wonderful Tonight.” It was painful. It was so bad that Shin apologized to me on behalf of the Japanese people for creating Karaoke. The Venice Room looks like it was the place to be at one point. Now it seems like it has gone the way of many neighborhood bars in the area. People want sports, so it's ESPN on the T.V. screen the entire night. The décor of the place has been ruined by way too many beer advertisements. And then, there is Karaoke. On the plus side, at least it’s not some hipster joint. The Venice Room serves its purpose. It’s a neighborhood bar for neighborhood people. Drinks are cheap and I can choose to fall into the fun or go to another place for drinks. That night we chose to go to Ordoñez for some late night food since The Venice Room had stopped serving food.

The Venice Room reminded me of dive bars I used to hang out in when I had just turned twenty-one. Each one was a new experience. Some I liked and some I didn’t. Most of the time, the places I liked were dictated on the jukebox. My favorite places were the ones that still had the jukeboxes with the 45’s in them. With CD jukeboxes, there is always that person who will play an entire Doors album. Then you get stuck listening to them sing along with the whole thing and soon you wish the joint had Karaoke. With 45’s, you had the choice of side A or B of a single. It discourages the jukebox hogs. You can’t play the entire “Dark Side Of The Moon” album because it can’t fit on a 45. I got exposed to some great music by not having many choices. The limited choices forced you to listen to artists that normally you wouldn’t listen to. Even if you only played the artists that you liked, you would be forced to listen to the b-side of a single at some point.

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Ancients

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 9, 2009 12:25am | Post a Comment
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The Jigoku Aesthetic: Hell as Excessive Specular Mediation

Posted by Charles Reece, March 8, 2009 08:42pm | Post a Comment
JIGOKU

jigoku

Hallucinate

jigoku

Dessegregate

jigoku

Mediate

jigoku

Alleviate

jigoku hell

Try not to hate

jigoku hell

Love your mate
Don't suffocate on your own hate


Ruth Crawford Seeger - Modernist-cum-Folkie

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 8, 2009 07:43pm | Post a Comment
Female composers getting the short shrift is certainly nothing new, and is by no means limited to classical music. But as an admittedly casual fan of atonality, dissonance, modernism and serialism, I was surprised in February of this year to, for the first time, stumble across Middlewestern composer Ruth Crawford Seeger's unique, innovative musical voice. She immediately became a featured artist on The Lunatic Asylum and I became interested in her story.

Ruth Porter Crawford was born on July 3, 1901 in East Liverpool, Ohio, supposedly the "World Capital of Pottery." Her father was an itinerant minister. Her mother began her musical education with piano lessons when she was 11. Upon graduation from high school, she entered Foster's School of Musical Art in Jacksonville, Florida. In 1921, when it relocated to Miami, Crawford enrolled at the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago, where she studied with Madame Valborg Collett, Polish-born Henriot Levy and Louise Robyn. By 24, with the completion of her earliest work, she already displayed a unique modernist voice.

Ruth Crawford c. 1924

In Chicago, she met Djane Lavoie Herz, who in turn introduced her to the music of sometime-serialist Russian composer Alexander Scriabin. Through Lavoie Herz, she met and fell in with transpersonal astrologer/composer Dane Rudhyar, theorist/composer Henry Cowell and pianist Richard Bühlig. Cowell was an early supporter of her work and arranged for performances of her compositions in New York, where her folkish take on avant-garde drew comparisons to the work of Charles Ives and Aaron Copland.

This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 8, 2009 12:20pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly!

The March / April calendar is now online:
www.NewBevCinema.com

Printed calendars will be in early this week! Now  we need your help to make sure they get seen - pick one up for yourself and a few for your friends!

Screenwriter Josh Olson, writer of the Oscar nominated script for David Cronenberg's 2005 film A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE, will be guest curator and will appear in person together with other special guests. The week kicks off with a screening of his A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE paired with Sam Peckinpah's STRAW DOGS, and then continues with a series of films selected by Mr. Olson.

From Josh Olson:

A couple years ago, I drove past the New Beverly, and came to a screeching halt in the rain when I saw they were showing a double feature of Straw Dogs and A History of Violence. I was flattered, honored, tickled, and half a dozen other things that felt pretty damn good, and I mentioned this event many times in many forums.

So, flash forward to this year, and I am now programming said theater for a week - the second week of March, to be precise.

There's no theme to the week, save "These are movies I love," and it's a weird, hodgepodge of stuff.

I'll be there to introduce them all, and, in some cases, to talk to some of the writers responsible for them.

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