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Clu Gulager Festival At The New Beverly Starts Tonight !

Posted by phil blankenship, August 27, 2008 10:44am | Post a Comment
Clu Gulager Festival at the New Beverly Cinema

 
Aug. 27-30: the New Beverly Cinema is honored to present the CLU GULAGER FILM FESTIVAL, a four-day series of films starring the venerable actor and longtime New Beverly patron and friend!

The films to be screened are THE RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD (1985) and FEAST (2006) on Aug. 27-28, and THE KILLERS (1964) and THE LAST PICTURE SHOW (1971) on Aug. 29-30. The festival will also include several short films and clips from various projects of Clu, including an extremely rare screening A DAY WITH THE BOYS, a short film directed by Clu in 1969, and VIC, a short film directed by SAGE STALLONE and starring Clu.

The following IN PERSON GUESTS are scheduled for the 7:30 screening of THE RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD on Wednesday, Aug. 27:

Writer/director DAN O'BANNON
actors CLU GULAGER, DON CALFA, JAMES KAREN, BEVERLY RANDOLPH, BRIAN PECK, THOM MATHEWS, JEWEL SHEPHARD and JOHN PHILBIN
make-up artist TONY GARDNER
production designer BILL STOUT

Director JOHN GULAGER is scheduled to introduce the 10:00 screening of FEAST on Wednesday evening!!

Pricing Codes

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, August 27, 2008 10:30am | Post a Comment
In previous decades many department stores and record chains developed a pricing code system. They'd have a few different letters, each signifying a different pricing tier. There would be a little chart around the store giving you the price break down. I never really understood how this made things simpler or more efficient, maybe someone out there knows?






JAMOEBLOG TOP TEN: WEEK OF 08:27:08

Posted by Billyjam, August 27, 2008 06:55am | Post a Comment
                                       JAMOEBLOG HIP-HOP TOP TEN: 08:27:08                                             

1) Homeboy Sandman "Opium" (Homeboy Sandman)

2) NaS feat Eban Thomas "You Can't Stop Me Now" (Def Jam)

3) Lee "Scratch" Perry  "$hine" (Narnack Records)

4) The High Decibels "Miss Cindy" (Rolling Jack)

5) Paris "Don't Stop the Movement" (Guerrila Funk)

6) Murs "Can It Be" (Warner)

7) Double Dee & Steinski "Lesson 3" (Illegal Art)

8) Foreign Legion "Come To The City" (Hunger Strike)

9) DJ Spinna "The Spirit of '94" (Colt 45)

10) The Bug "Freak Freak" (Ninja Tune)

The number one on this week's Jamoeblog Hip-Hop Top Ten (a subjective song-based chart) is from up-and-coming Queens, NY emcee talent Homeboy Sandman, whose totally unique flow and style is a breath of fresh air in an otherwise overcrowded sea of cookie cutter rappers. So far only available through his website, as well as at a few select East Coast record stores, Homeboy Sandman's self-released debut CD Actual Factual Pterodactyl offers up hip-hop like you've never heard before, with great songs such as the slow-mo flow of "Opium" or the funny uptempo rapid fire delivery of "Food Glorious Food" which draws its hook from the Oliver! soundtrack.

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Alienator

Posted by phil blankenship, August 26, 2008 10:17pm | Post a Comment
Alienator sci-fi movie starring Jan -Michael Vincent and John Phillip Law  Alienator videocassette

Alienator plot synopsis

 
Prism Entertainment 6054

David S. Ware's Surrendered: killer jazz quartet's languishing gem

Posted by J. Mark Beaver, August 26, 2008 02:40pm | Post a Comment
David S. Ware Surrendered
I have to say that I do understand how an album as solid as Surrendered could get lost in the shuffle. David S. Ware has been recording under his own name since 1988, and in groups led by legendary names like Cecil Taylor, Andrew Cyrille and Barry Harris since the early 70's. In these last 20 years of releases under his own name, Ware has released about an album per year. So, where to start? And what are the chances that an album or two might slip through the cracks and end up in Amoeba's Clearance section?

Ware is considered by many to be a technical (and perhaps theological) descendant of John Coltrane. His tenor is big and brash, in a mold not unlike Pharaoh Sanders, Arthur Blythe or Archie Shepp. His facility is masterful, never neglecting the changes and yet pushing and pulling at the melodic core of the composition. He plays the whole range: he dives off the pier and swims far enough from shore to nurture tension, but he never lets go of his lifeline-- the strong melody within a strong composition. In fact, that's what pulls me to Ware over and over again. His albums are always so full of real composition. Songs are what he and his teams bring to the table, in this case, the killer quartet made up of pianist Matthew Shipp, percussionist Guillermo Brown, and a man I consider to be essential listening any and every time one has the chance, bassist William Parker.

Surrendered starts strongly with a tone poem of sorts called "Peace Celestial." Matthew Shipp holds the core of the piece with piano meditations conjuring Bill Evans or Keith Jarrett at his more internal. "Sweet Georgia Bright" follows, and is the album's most traditional "bop" composition, and it's the lesser for it. This quartet's strength is in the idiom of the post-Coltrane continuum. Tracks like the aforementioned opener, "Theme of Ages," the loping title track with its slow, even build reminiscent of Charles Lloyd's "Night-Blooming Jasmine," and even, to a great extent, "Glorified Calypso," tour that greater territory of improvisational and textural possibilities that the legendary Art Ensemble of Chicago liked to refer to as, "Great Black Music," rather than bind it within the limits and collected baggage of the term "jazz."

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