Amoeblog

Amoeba Berkeley Crosses The Bridge To Rock Your Pants Off!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, August 7, 2009 11:20am | Post a Comment
By Spenser Cooper Russell-Snyder

This year's Amoebapalooza was yet another all out bash, but this year we joined the SF store at The Mezzanine for a gigantic morsel of audible chaos. The Berkeley store brought the rock this year, starting
with the ethereal and revving up the noise with each following act.

amoebapalooza 2009

First up for the Berkeley store was Stormy King and The Mad Switch. Plucking her 12 string acoustic guitar, Stormy and mad-switcher Matt opened the night with a great mix of electro-acoustic soundscapes.
With beautiful and almost eerie vocals, Stormy captivated the crowd and got us ready for the rest of the evening.

amoebapalooza 2009

After a San Franciscan band, B.B. & The Bop Guns hit the stage. The three-piece switched instruments with each song, yet was consistent in their blues-inspired garage rock. Headed up by Amoeba's Brenden, the band flooded the audience with cool attitude and hip songs to match.

amoebapalooza 2009

Next on the Berkeley roster was the group Erica Jong, which featured buyer Marty Dowers and his sister Danielle. With the Dowers siblings locked in, the band freed everyone's mind with odd meters and a combo including violin, keys, guitar, bass and drums.

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BEST OF THE EAST BAY 2009 + OTHER BAY AREA WEEKEND EVENTS

Posted by Billyjam, August 7, 2009 11:10am | Post a Comment

Jody Colley (EBX) talks to Amoeblog about today's big event

Once again this summer weekend in the Bay Area there are a wealth of wonderful happenings, many of them free. One of the biggest events is, of course, the mega, must-attend East Bay Express' (EBX) big annual Subcultures souls of mischiefBest Of The East Bay Party at the Oakland Museum of California featuring the Amoeba Music Main Stage with such acts as Goapele, Souls of Mischief, 7th Street Band, C U Next Weekend, Maldroid, Fracas, and Social Unrest. The above video is of Jody Colley, the tireless publisher of the independently owned and operated weekly, taking a break from setting up for this evening's big event to talk briefly with the Amoeblog about what to expect at the event that starts at 5pm sharp today (Friday August 7th).  That's exactly when, on the Amoeba Music Main Stage, The Thrill of it All -- the first of 13 acts scheduled to play on that stage -- will prompty begin. Social Unrest, the closing act, will hit the stage at 11pm for their half-hour punk rock set.

Same as last year's party, Amoeba Music will again have a booth set up (stop by and say "hi" to Naomi S. and the rest of the Amoeba crew) where you can spin the wheel of fortune and win goodies and get free stuff. But that is just the tip of the iceberg at this event, which, as Jody says in the above interview, is expected to draw 10,000 people. The diverse mix of entertainment includes a Kids Zone, Gearhead Garage, Professional Contact Sports, plus much more in the museum's outdoor garden area. Of course, the Oakland Museum's exhibits -- alone worth the trip -- are also all open to the public. As Jody stresses, since a lot of people are expected to be converging on the big, free party (especially after word about how dope last year's party at the same venue was), try to get there earlier rather than later to ensure admission and leave your cars at home (valet bike parking provided).

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FILM DIRECTOR JOHN HUGHES DIES SUDDENLY TODAY AT AGE 59

Posted by Billyjam, August 6, 2009 04:30pm | Post a Comment
Trailer for John Hughes' Sixteen Candles starring Molly Ringwald

John Hughes, the filmmaker responsible for (to name but a few) such 1980's films as Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, Pretty in Pink, Weird Science, Some Kind of Wonderful, She's Having a Baby, and Ferris Bueller's Day Off (all available on DVD at Amoeba), died earlier today after suffering a sudden heart attack during a walk this morning in Manhattan. He was only 59. Read the full report here.


Weird Science trailer

Ben Chasny of Six Organs of Admittance Chats

Posted by Miss Ess, August 6, 2009 02:37pm | Post a Comment
Ben Chasny is the man, the myth from Drag City guitar fest Six Organs of Admittance. Sounds like the making of his latest record, Luminous Light, out August 18, was some seriously risky business, what with the Turkish prison-style atmosphere and all! Check out our correspondance below:

ben chasny

Miss Ess: What music did you hear in your house when you were growing up, before you had a choice? Do you think this music had any influence on you?
rolling stones tattoo you
Ben Chasny: The Rolling Stones - Tattoo You. Well, I have a crazy tribal backplate, so yes.

ME: When did you pick up the guitar?

BC: When I realized it was a lot easier to play like that than when it was lying on the ground (waa waaaa).

ME: When and how did you start writing songs?

BC: When I was 3. I wrote a song called "The Futility of the Rattle" inspired by Sartre. I've tried to simplify things since then.

ME: How has living in Seattle as opposed to the Bay Area influenced your latest batch of songs?

BC: Well, I can still look California here but feel Minnesota. Or is it thsix organs luminous lighte other way around?

ME: What made you ready to move away from a mostly guitar-based sound for this album?

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The evolution of the music video, part II (1950s - 1960s)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, August 6, 2009 01:45pm | Post a Comment
As persuasively and incontestably argued in The evolution of the music video, part I  (1890s - 1940s), the music video began not in the '80s, as is often wrongly assumed, but the '90s... the 1890s (if we accept the basic concept of videos being one stand-alone work of one song/one visual). From the humble sound experiments at the dawn of the celluloid age through the artistic flowering of Soundies, many musical promos were created of high historical and artistic importance. In the 1950s and '60s, videos moved from bars and clubs to the living room, as television became the new venue for music promotion.

Cineboxes, Scopitones and Color-Sonics
According to the Quixotic Internet Accuracy Project, the term "music video" was coined by DJ (VJ?) J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson in 1959. That year, the Cinebox hit the scene, essentially following in the footsteps of Soundies by manufacturing videos for what was essentially a jukebox with a visual component. In 1965, the Cinebox was re-branded the Colorama in the US. The following year it was again re-branded, this time as the Cinejukebox.

Cinebox Brochure  Frankie Avalon and a Cinebox Cinebox highlights

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