Amoeblog

out last week 3/10 & 3/17...white lies...cursive...bonnie prince billy...

Posted by Brad Schelden, March 23, 2009 07:30pm | Post a Comment
Sometimes I forget that bands still make videos. Back before I had MTV I was obsessed with videos and watched them whenever I got a chance. It was hard to find videos and you had to watch late night TV or be one of the lucky people with cable. It is now so easy to watch videos, but for some reason I watch them rarely. MTV doesn't really play videos anymore, but they are now so easily accessible on your phone and computer through YouTube. It is almost too easy. Maybe it is not as fun because it is so easy. Every once in a while I remember how easy it is and I easily spend hours catching up and watching videos. The next couple of weeks have some very exciting new releases. These last couple of weeks are also not so bad. New albums by Bonnie Prince Billy and Cursive and White Lies and Wavves and Tim Hecker. I also really like the new Handsome Furs. This blog is extremely short so you can spend some time watching some videos.

Here are some songs from the last couple of weeks of albums

Handsome Furs "I'm Confused" from the new album Face Control OUT NOW...



White Lies "Farewell to the Fairground" from the album To Lose My Life OUT NOW...



Cursive "Dorothy At Forty" from the album Mama I'm Swollen OUT NOW...

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WHEN RAPPERS UNITED IN SONG: CLASSIC POSSE CUTS: 1988 - 1994

Posted by Billyjam, March 23, 2009 07:05pm | Post a Comment

"Posse cuts": the phenomenon whereby large collectives of rappers linked by crew, region, or, most often, by a common cause, all would get together to record a massive joint effort. Posse cuts were most popular circa '88 to '94-- coincidentally the same years as hip-hop's much lauded golden age.

These multiple emcee, pass-the-mic styled hip-hop songs date back to hip-hop's formative years (many of them freestyle sessions in the 1970's Boogie Down that were not even recorded and some that were, such as Afrika Bambaataa & the Soul Sonic Force's "Zulu Nation Throwdown" in 1980). It wasn't until the later 1980's that the posse cut came into its own. Below are the videos of seven of some of the best posse cuts from this six-year span -- all timeless, classic hip-hop recordings that I personally never tire of.

1988's Marley Marl-produced "The Symphony" by The Juice Crew not only put the posse cut format firmly on the rap map but it also remains one of the best singles in hip-hop history, period. On it, each contributor of the Queensbridge extended hip-hop family flows like water: Masta Ace, Craig G, Kool G Rap, and Big Daddy Kane -- all over a dope Marley Marl (known as "Dusty Marl" in the video below) track that samples Otis Redding. Note that this video is not the full album version as found on the 1988 Cold Chillin Marley Marl album In Control Volume 1.

The 1989 posse cut "Self Destruction" by the star studded Stop The Violence Movement was an even grander and more ambitious project in terms of the number of talented emcees that would bless the mic for this heartfelt anti-violence anthem that came about following a fatal fight that broke out during a Public Enemy/Boogie Down Productions concert. The tragedy inspired KRS-One to form the Stop the Violence Movement. After doing so, he co-produced a track with fellow BDP member D-Nice, enlisted some of the East Coast's best and recorded the single "Self Destruction" on Jive with all proceeds going to the National Urban League. The stellar lineup included KRS-One, Ms Melodie, D Nice, Chuck D, Flavor Flav, Kool Moe Dee, MC Lyte, Stetsasonic's Daddy O, Delite, Fruitkwan, Wise, Doug E Fresh, Just Ice, and Heavy D.

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(Wherein we chance upon something Slick.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 23, 2009 06:16pm | Post a Comment
russian
Furvin Kryakutnoy, Russian inventor and possibly the inventor of the hot air balloon,
has nothing to do with this blog entry.

Here I am, again on my own. I can feel your pretty eyes on me, reading this, waiting to see what I have to say for myself. I am in the past – your past. By the time you read this, I will be gone. I will have scribbled my way through another witty and unnecessary blog.

But here in the past, dear reader, things do not seem so certain. I do not know, as yet (for example), what this entry will be about. Oh sure, it’s easy for you to scroll down the page and glean its general themes, but for someone like me who lives back in the time before this blog was written and done, all is mystery. All is uncertain. I do not even know who or what music or movies will first be mentioned.

Shall I leave it to chance? Shall I see what the Oracle that is YouTube has decided is an appropriate recommendation for me? (For those of you who don’t know, after you’ve used YouTube a bit, it begins to analyze what you tend to look for, then it offers suggestions of stuff you may enjoy, based on your history.) Here, then, is what YouTube thinks I will fancy:


…Huh.

…Well…

I’m not sure what to say. I can’t think of anything I’ve tried to find on YouTube that would justify this selection. Do they know something about me that I don’t? Some deeper insight unavailable to my conscious mind that only they, in their ability to collect and refine data, can provide?

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Morrissey

Posted by Amoebite, March 22, 2009 09:54pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

Coachella LineupMorrissey Keychain

Day #6 - Artist #6 - Morrissey:

The man, the myth, the legend, the Morrissey.

Talking about Morrissey is like talking about the Pope. It doesn't matter if I say something good or bad, I'm still going to piss somebody off. Great..now there's a third group of people I'm going to potentially piss off for comparing Morrissey to the Pope. No, I'm not comparing the two men to each other. The only similarity is that when talking about the two, one considers them either a deity or a joke. There's not much middle ground. So I'm going to be Morrissey's Switzerland. I will provide watches, cheese, chocolate and bank accounts...but no opinions.
Morrissey street art
But what I do want to mention is an interesting phenomenon that first introduced me to Morrissey. When I was in high school, my friends and I were jamming out to Metallica, Black Sabbath, Pantera, and Tool albums, so throwing on a Morrissey record was not much of an option. If I was caught with a Morrissey record in my zippered CD wallet (remember those?), I would have been excommunicated (no pun intended) from the group that hung out in the "D-Wing" at Fred C. Beyer High School. Because of that, I didn't discover Morrissey or the Smiths until a little later in life. 

Arthur Verocai @ The Luckman 3/15

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 22, 2009 09:32pm | Post a Comment

Arthur Verocai's
solo album from 1972 is a must have for everyone. It’s on my personal “Five albums that I would like to have with me on a desert island” list. Verocai’s recent performance on March 15, 2009 was his first ever in Los Angeles. To be honest, even for me, a big fan of Verocai’s music, and despite knowing that this might be a once in a lifetime chance to see this man perform, I almost skipped it. I have been disappointed by the past performances put together by Mochilla, a collection of artists and deejays responsible for bringing acts such as Mulatu Ashtake, Azymuth, Tony Allen and other tasty record geek namedrops to Los Angeles over the last few years. The artists are usually paired with Los Angeles based musicians, who are very talented but not always cohesive. The past performances relied on the musicians' ability to improvise rather than their ability to interpret the artist’s compositions. As a fan of the song, I felt that the songs got lost in the solos and improvisation.

However, on this night, everything was perfect. Verocai was backed by an impressive line-up of L.A and Brazilian musicians, including Mamao Conti from Azymuth, Carlos Dafe (a great and underated singer who sang on Verocai 1972 masterpiece) and Airto Moreira, who has played with Miles Davis, Return To Forever and Weather Report. Verocai’s compositions are, to me, part Gil Evans, part Brian Wilson and part Lo Borges. Each composition flowed smoothly, taking on a life beyond the original recordings. The result was an hour and a half of beautifully arranged Brazilian pop that had me wishing Milton Nacimento could get the same treatment the next time he comes to town. Verocai's strength comes not only from his compositions but also from his arrangements. This allowed the audience to witness the brilliance of both his music and the musicians backing him up. This was probably one of my favorite concerts in quite some time. His music was appreciated by fans and newcomers alike.

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