Amoeblog

The Moon missions and the children of Major Tom -- the end of the space age and the music that followed

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 20, 2009 03:58pm | Post a Comment
first moon landing

It's the 40th anniversary of the first manned moon landing, and looking back at that achievement it's obvious that one of the many repercussions was evinced in the music of the era. In addition to the space rock of bands like Pink Floyd and Hawkwind and sci-fi minded funk acts like Funkadelic, the glam rock scene, which exploded around the same time, is one of the most obvious manifestations. For a couple of years, glam rock was massively popular in several countries and it spawned hordes of mylar-and-make-up-wearing rockers singing about extraterrestrial love and lonely planet boys. On December 7, 1972, the Apollo 17 was the last manned mission to the moon and the space age, shortly after, seems to have drawn quietly to a close. Glam rock seemed to fizzle shortly afterward, but maybe it just went underground, seeking out new frontiers in a different set of clothes.



First, in 1973, David Bowie retired his extraterrestrial Ziggy Stardust and released Aladdin Sane. Although hardly a radical departure, it was famously hyped as "Ziggy goes to America" and represented Bowie's efforts to move in a new direction. Then, in early 1974, glam rock's creator Marc Bolan announced that "Glam rock is dead." His February release, Zinc Alloy and the Hidden Riders of Tomorrow - A Creamed Cage in August, was described by its creator as "cosmic soul." Bowie described his next direction as "plastic soul" shortly afterward. Glam's two most important stars seemed committed to moving on in spirit, if perhaps overstating the change in their music.

The Hitter

Posted by phil blankenship, July 20, 2009 03:39pm | Post a Comment
The Hitter starring Ron O'Neal  The Hitter directed by Christopher Leitch

The Hitter plot synopsis

Sony G0633

FCCLA tribute concert this thursday afternoon

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 20, 2009 11:45am | Post a Comment
Last month I posted about the First Congregation Church of Los Angeles and their enormous organs.  A few weeks have passed and I've not found the time to make it out there again, but I'll try this Thursday, July 23rd, as they're having a 10 player tribute to a long attending devotee. I believe that I had the pleasure of speaking to the man a while back; he had been coming for 50+ years and was a player himself. He explained to me and my Pal Joey a little about the layout of the organs and how they worked.  Anyhow, it should be a great concert and I think it's the last one for a few weeks, as the oragans are going to go through their annual tune-up for a while. Below I've included a blow-by-blow account of the behind the scenes action of the FCCLA Great Organs.

FCCLA
540 South Commonwealth Ave. (6th Street)
Los Angeles, CA
90020


BEASTIE BOYS POSTPONE TOUR & ALBUM DUE TO MCA'S CANCER

Posted by Billyjam, July 20, 2009 11:18am | Post a Comment

As officially (and good-humoredly) announced in the above YouTube clip via the group's website posting from earlier this morning, the Beastie Boys' Adam Yauch has been diagnosed with gland cancer and will soon have to undergo treatment. Consequently, the Beastie Boys have had to cancel and postpone upcoming concert dates and also move back their next album, Hot Sauce's, release date. Joining Adam "MCA" Yauch in the surprise video announcement today was fellow Beastie Boy Adam "Ad-Rock" Horovitz. Upcoming Beastie Boys scheduled dates had included playing Outside Lands, August 30th in the Bay Area and the Hollywood Bowl on September 24th. If you had already bought tix for these or other shows, contact the place of purchase to determine officially whether or not the band is no longer playing.

Watering (Down) the Avant-Garden: Pierre Henry and Sampling

Posted by Charles Reece, July 20, 2009 10:35am | Post a Comment
Unpredictable, Opening Concert 25.1.2008, Volksbühne am Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz, Berlin.

The recent issue of The Wire caught up with one of the fathers of sampling, musique concrète maestro Pierre Henry. He's been down on the contemporary state of electronic music for awhile. The article begins with a quote from a 1997 interview:

"Today I feel less inspired[.] We're living at a time where everything is controlled, planned and codified and even popular music isn't popular any more, it's imposed upon us."

And he's not any more positive now:

"I think it's a big mistake to call today's music electronic music[.] People do things with computers and samples but it's not the same approach as the way I work, or how Karlheinz Stockhausen worked in his electronic pieces. There is not the same craft, and it's not progress."

Suggesting by implication that the sound collages of El-P, the world creation of Tod Dockstader, Matmos' technological music, or even Björk's omnivorous use of the sounds she finds do not involve a high level of craft just seems wrong-headed to me. The "problem" was better stated in the older interview: codification. When a revolution takes place, there will then follow a prolonged period in which people work under the new order. Not everyone can be Chairman Mao (nothing's more ironic and true in this regard than Maoism -- the revolutionary figure par excellence was used as the ultimate criterion by which the subsequent potential equality of all others was to be judged). Thanks to the revolution of Mssrs. Henry, Stockhausen, Varese and Schaeffer, electronic music has now become a genre, whether Henry likes it or not. Why? Consider Thomas Kuhn's distinction between normal and revolutionary science as they pertain to working within what he called a paradigm:

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