Amoeblog

August 17, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, August 18, 2009 10:46am | Post a Comment
Infinite Animation: The Work Of Adam Beckett

AMOEBA INSTORE SERIES SHOWCASE JAY REATARD'S LOVE OF PUNK

Posted by Billyjam, August 18, 2009 07:30am | Post a Comment
Jay Reatard - "It Ain't Gonna Save Me" off Watch Me Fall (Matador, 2009)

Anyone who rushes to write off Jay Reatard's music as unoriginal or derivative of punk's past is missing the whole point of the supertalented, highly profilic artist with a love of Lo-Fi recordings. His anticipated new record Watch Me Fall on Matador comes out today and at 6pm today Reatard will play Amoeba Music Hollywood in his first of three Amoeba Music free in-stores. The other two Amoeba parts of Reatard's Indie Record Store Tour are Saturday at Amoeba San Francisco and Sunday at Amoeba Berkeley -- both at 6pm.

Born Jimmy Lee Lindsey Jr., Memphis, TN's Jay Reatard has long been a huge fan of punk and post Jay Reatard Watch Me Fallpunk, especially the type with pop driven chord progressions that you can scream at the top of your lungs along with, as you can tell from listening to his numerous recordings under The Reatards and other names he has played under. It's like he totally absorbs punk's rich, robust past and spews it out with reinvigorated delight in stage shows that have have become so legendary they have threatened to overshadow the music itself, as mentioned last week in the wonderful Amoeblog Jay Reatard Amoeba Instore Tour post!

But, getting back to Jay Reatard's music, which at once sounds new yet totally familiar to anyone who has been a fan of punk and power pop punk over the years, the artist has said time and again that he has a deep passion for where music has come from and is merely putting his spin on it. Most recently, in an interview with Mike Rubin published two days ago in the New York Times, Reatard summed it up best when he said, "The whole concept for me behind pop music is to take your influences and filter them through yourself, and then they become something new. I’m not trying to move forward and create territory that hasn’t been mined before, I’m just trying to do my version of something that I like.”

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Amoeba Hollywood Latin Rock & Pop Top 10 For August 2009

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, August 18, 2009 01:07am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Hollywood Latin Rock & Pop Top 10 For August 2009 (So Far)

1. Bebe-Y.
2. Chico Sonido- S/T
3. Zoe- Reptilectric
4. Eydie Gorme Y Los Panchos- Cantan En Español
5. Manu Chao- Clandestino
6. Los Amigos Invisibles- Commercial
7. Juan Son- Mermaid Sashimi
8. Fangoria- Absolutamente
9. Hombres G - Los Singles 1985-2005
10. Several artists tied at number 10.

Every week, I look into new release books supplied by the four Latin majors for new releases. Some, like Juan Son and the new Natalia LaFourcade, are currently out in Latin America only. Instead of seeing those aforementioned artists in the new release books, I usually see the same type of releases. It’s either a set of repackaged titles by the same artists, or worse, a cheap two artists on one CD with only ten songs on it. Turn the pages and you see a slew of unknown pop singers who are either the son or daughter of a famous singer, the child of a record industry head or the mistress of a record industry head. I’m telling you, I have smacked my hand against my head in disgust so many times I think I have a permanent palm mark on my forehead.

So, how do I get the new Juan Son to Amoeba Music Hollywood? I had to get someone to smuggle some across the border! Mermaid Sashimi debuts at number seven and in getting the small amount of imports that I got, word is spreading fast. Much like Zoe’s Reptilectric before it was released in the states, Mermaid Sashimi is selling by Internet buzz and plain old word of mouth.

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Killer Film Noir Double This Wed & Thurs @ New Beverly

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, August 17, 2009 11:30pm | Post a Comment

The Vince Edwards & Marie Windsor pairing in Kubrick's The Killing is one of my favorite low life partnerings in film noir. Both actors play it to the hilt, setting off a serious time bomb by arrogantly smothering cuckold Elisha Cook Jr. with their sleazy and obvious relations. Although they do not star together in these films, Vince is in the first feature and Marie is in the second. I don't think I've seen a noir with either of them in it that I didn't love! Also, the New Bev just replaced all their seats-- no more ass fatigue! Neither title is available on DVD, but keep an eye out in the noir section of our mezzanine late this year, as both are scheduled for release.

New Beverly Cinema
Wed & Thur
August 19th & 20th

Murder By Contract (1958) 7:30

The Sniper

(1952) 9:10

7165 Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036-2548
(323) 938-4038




Clip from The Sniper

Miles Davis' Kind Of Blue

Posted by Whitmore, August 17, 2009 11:27pm | Post a Comment

So I use to run this illegal bar, a speakeasy, and the specialty of the house was your traditional Vodka or Gin martini -- straight up, a couple of olives or a tiny pickled onion or a sliver of a lemon peel, no frills but a damn, damn good martini and never, ever a frigging apple pomegranate fusion monstrosity.
 
(H. L. Mencken once said the martini was "the only American invention as perfect as the sonnet," and I’d like to keep it that way. And since I’m on the subject... a martini should be stirred not shaken. Sorry Mr. Bond, but all you are ordering up is some weakass drink, watered down by melting shards of ice. Once and for all, a martini should be stirred, never shaken and served in a painfully cold glass.)
 
Anyway, the best part of the night was always after hours, around 4 or 4:30 in the morning. At that hour it was always quiet, I was relaxed, the patrons were relaxed, folks just sat around -- the trouble of the day or week was behind them, the stress of trying to get laid had more or less strayed, at least momentarily, though sex springs eternal and with the new dawn you knew at least one fresh scheme would soon ascend, prospectively. The soul, body and mind, conceivably worn to the bone, inevitably found a re-energized oomph in a good drunken conversation over one last martini. I loved the pretension almost as much as I loved that time of the day. And the perfect music to play at that hour was always, always Miles DavisKind of Blue.
 
Well, 50 years ago today, August 17, 1959, Kind of Blue was released on Columbia Records, in both mono and stereo, catalogue number CL-1355. The recording sessions took place earlier in the year in New York City, on March 2 and April 22, and featured soon to be legends all: Miles Davis on trumpet, pianists Bill Evans and Wynton Kelly, and John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderley on saxophones, with drummer Jimmy Cobb and bassist Paul Chambers.
 
So cool, so beautiful, so perfect, contemplative, sleek and sophisticated. Kind of Blue soars into uncharted space; five decades ago it stretched the boundaries and the very definition of jazz. Davis’, along with arranger Gil Evans’ modal experimentations abandoned the traditional song concept of chord changes to support a melody in favor of musical scales, re-inventing improvisation and a sound that would dominate the form of jazz for rest of the century. And though exact numbers have never quite been formulated, Kind of Blue has been cited as the best-selling jazz record of all time. On October 7, 2008, it was certified quadruple platinum. But beyond numbers, Kind of Blue is regarded by many critics as the greatest jazz album of all time and Miles Davis's masterpiece.


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