Amoeblog

TVLP

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, December 4, 2008 09:20am | Post a Comment
Bobby Sherman Getting Together lp coverRay Conniff Tv Themes LP coverone to one forward your emotions lp coverJoni Mitchell Wild Thing's Run Fast LP cover
John Stewart Punch the Big Guy LP coverTony Randall and Jack Klugman the Odd Couple Sings LP coverSelecter Celebrate the Bullet LP coverJohn Stewart Punch the Big Guy LP back cover
Kelly Osbourne One Word Lp coverMeet Robert Clary Lp coverSuburbs lp covermara akate cover
Glen Campbell it's the world gone crazy lp coverVideo All Stars TV Jazz themes lp coverWho Hooligans LP coverGeorge Harrison Brainwashed Lp cover
Ian Matthews Spot Of Interference lp coverLegendary Stardust Cowboy LP coverRush Power Windows LabelJ Geils Band Flashback LP cover

HIP-HOP CLASSICS: EPMD, 1988 - 1992 SIX VIDEOS

Posted by Billyjam, December 4, 2008 07:55am | Post a Comment

EPMD
(aka Erick and Parrish Making Dollars), comprised of Erick Sermon & Parrish Smith, will forever remain one of the all time classic hip-hop acts. As proof, here are six music videos of some of the duo's best tracks from back in the day. From the years 1988 - 1992 these include the songs "Crossover," "The Big Payback," "So What Cha Sayin," "You Gots To Chill," the posse track "Head Banger" feat. Redman, K-Solo, and Das EFX,  "Strictly Business" -- culled from the duo's (always "business" themed) albums Strictly Business, Unfinished Business, and Business Never Personal.  Look for EPMD's music on vinyl and CD at Amoeba Music and next week (Dec 9th) check for their brand new album We Mean Business which will feature guest shots from Redman, Keith Murray, Method Man, KRS-One, Raekwon, Havoc, and others.


EPMD "Crossover" (1992)


EPMD "The BIg Payback" (1989)


EPMD "You Gots To Chill" (1988)

EPMD "So What Cha Sayin" (1989)


EPMD "Strictly Business" (1988)

Jorn Utzon 1918 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, December 3, 2008 06:09pm | Post a Comment

The architect who designed one of the world’s most recognizable buildings, the Sydney Opera House in Australia, yet never saw the completed project, Jorn Utzon, died of heart failure in his sleep in Copenhagen this last week. He was 90.
Born April 9, 1918 in Aalborg, Denmark, Jorn Utzon studied architecture at the Royal Academy in Copenhagen. After establishing his own practice in Copenhagen in 1950, he entered the 1956 international architecture competition to design the new Sydney Opera House. He spent six months designing the unique sail-like roofs, his nautical design is said to have been inspired by sections of an orange. Utzon triumphed over 232 other entries; he was just 38 years age and hardly known outside his native country. For the next five years he worked on the project from his office in Denmark until he moved his family to Sydney to oversee construction in 1962.
It would be Utzon’s greatest design, on which most of his architectural reputation is based. It is also Australia’s most famous landmark and one of the most celebrated, influential and iconic buildings of the 20th century.
The Opera House is surrounded on three sides by the waters of Sydney Harbour at Benelong Point. The five performance halls are housed under ten reinforced concrete shells, dressed in white tiles. The sail-like shells and the upturned ships’ hulls rise 60 meters high above a four-and-a-half-acre concrete and granite platform which was inspired by the ceremonial steps of Monte Alban in Mexico.
However in 1966, seven years before completion, controversy erupted. Utzon resigned and packed up his family, leaving Australia never to return. With only the shell of the Opera House done, Utzon found himself in the middle of a power struggle and at odds with local politicians, specifically Davis Hughes, the New South Wales minister for public works who criticized the cost overruns and delays. At a price tag of more than $100 million Australian dollars, the original project was budgeted at ridiculously low estimate of $7 million. After Utzon’s resignation, the Opera House was completed by Government appointed architects who finished the interiors by drastically changing the original layouts to the five theaters.
In recent years Australia had tried reconciling with Jorn Utzon. In 2002, he was commissioned to update the interior renovations, in an attempt to alleviate the acoustic problems and bring the building closer to its original vision. In 2003, Mr. Utzon received an honorary doctorate from the University of Sydney. And in October of 2004 the Utzon Room, overlooking Sydney Harbor, was officially dedicated.
In 2003 Utzon won what is considered architecture’s highest honor, The Pritzker. Frank Gehry, one of the jurors, said Jorn Utzon “… made a building well ahead of its time, far ahead of available technology, and he persevered through extraordinary malicious publicity and negative criticism to build a building that changed the image of an entire country.”
After leaving Australia, Utzon worked in Switzerland and Spain before settling in Majorca in the mid-1970s, where he would live and work for the rest of his life. Besides designing the Sydney Opera House, he designed the Bagsværd Church in Denmark (1968-76), the National Assembly of Kuwait, completed in 1983 and rebuilt in 1993, many private residences, and his own home in Majorca.
Jorn Utzon is survived by his wife of 66 years, Lis Fenger, three children, Jan, Kim, and Lin, five grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Saul Bass' PHASE IV Saturday Midnight At The New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, December 3, 2008 11:06am | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!

 




Saturday December 6

 


Phase IV(1974)

dir. Saul Bass
starring Michael Murphy, Nigel Davenport & Lynne Frederick
Paramount Archive 35mm Print!


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Midnight, $7

 



YouTube Symphony Orchestra takes it to next level

Posted by Billyjam, December 3, 2008 09:45am | Post a Comment

 

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice. But after first downloading music (by Tan Dun) and then uploading a video of you performing said piece of music. Hot on the heels of the recent big YouTube Live event out of San Francisco, the San Bruno based video sharing website continue in their bid for worldwide web domination with their next exciting project: the first-ever collaborative online orchestra that you (if you make music) can be a part of. The project is a collaborative effort by YouTube with the London Symphony Orchestra, Carnegie Hall, director of the San Francisco Symphony conductor Michael Tilson Thomas, composer Tan Dun, and pianist Lang Lang (now known as "The first YouTube Symphony Orchestra Ambassador").

This unique project, which began accepting applicants two days ago and will continue for the next eight weeks, is open to all: both amatuer and professional musicians who play any instrument, of all ages and in all locations are encouraged to audition for the YouTube Symphony Orchestra by submitting a video performance of a new piece written for the occasion by the renowned Chinese composer Tan Dun (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon). Offered online via YouTube are tools to help learn the music, rehearse with the conductor and upload appliants part for the collaborative video.

Finalists will be chosen by a judging panel and YouTube users to travel to New York in April 2009, to participate in the YouTube Symphony Orchestra summit, and play at Carnegie Hall under the direction of Michael Tilson Thomas. The deadline for all video submissions is January 28, 2009. Official details here.

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