Amoeblog

A B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Posted by Billyjam, April 27, 2009 08:11pm | Post a Comment


















Folky South America & Cuba

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, April 27, 2009 12:54am | Post a Comment
Baden Powell- "Samba Triste"

This is a beautiful version of the classic Brazilian song.



Genesis- "Como Decirte Cuanto Te Amo"

This is a cover of Cat Steven's "How Can I Tell You" done by the Colombian band called Genesis (pronounced Hen-knee-sis in Spanish). The group is not to be confused with the Peter Gabriel fronted group or worse, that god-awful Phil Collins fronted Genesis...Didn't anyone else in the 80's notice how offensive the song "Illegal Alien" was? Crazy, that song was a hit too!



Silvio Rodriguez- Ojala

Silvio Rodriguez is a Cuban trovador, hugely famous among revolutionaries all across Latin America. Ojala is actually an Arabic word that the Spanish inherited from the Moors. In Arabic, ojala is actually
"o allah!" as in "Allah, please grant it." In Spanish, it is used in the context of "to wish" or better yet, "to hope." There is a great Juan Luis Guerra song that is called "Ojala Que Llueve Cafe" (I hope it rains coffee) which Cafe Tacvba made even more famous. Ojala que lleve cafe is what I hope every morning when I wake up...just as long as it comes with a little cream and some sugar. They use the word ojala in Farsi as well.

Joyce & Los Flippers

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, April 26, 2009 11:43pm | Post a Comment

Los Flippers
-Pronto Viviremos Un Mundo Mucho Mejor

This is a comp of the Colombian rock group Los Flippers, mostly from the late sixties going into the early 70’s. Gone are their mod looks and their Beatles covers in Spanish. Their hair is now long and the songs are even longer. But before you dismiss them as South American hippies, check out the funkiness of “Vivamos Siempre Juntos,” a song that is a mixture of Buddy Miles' “Them Changes” and the Otis Redding/Carla Thomas duet “Tramp.” During this era of the band, Los Flippers were influenced by groups such as The Chambers Brothers, Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin. The power trio added a horn section, making their music both funky fresh and bien pesado! Make your sixty-year old South American rocker uncle proud and blast this at your next family gathering -- sit back and let him tell you how it was back in the day. Maybe he’ll break out his original Grupo Genesis vinyl for you!

Joyce-Vision Of Dawn

This is a lost album of Joyce that dates back to 1976; it is a recording session that she did in Paris with fellow Brazilians Nana Vasconcelos and Maurio Maestro. They took their cue from their participation in the Clube Da Esquina songwriter movement, which included Milton Nacimento, Lo Borges and Nelson Angelo, who made a brilliant album with Joyce back in 1972. Vision Of Dawn flows much in the same vein as those classic Clube Da Esquina albums, with psychedelic folk, bossa nova and jazz leanings. At times, Visions Of Dawn sounds like what was coming out of California during the same time, but there is a melancholy that Brazilian music captures that no other music in the world has. It’s not gloom and doom, but it’s an instant grey cloud that covers you like a warm blanket. So slip this disc in player, lay on the couch and cover yourself with a cozy blanket and let the music take over your head. Highly recommended.

April 26, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, April 26, 2009 10:12pm | Post a Comment
Adventureland movie ticket stub Arclight Hollywood

Adventureland credits

Noir Do Wells 2: Desperate (1947)

Posted by Charles Reece, April 26, 2009 08:34pm | Post a Comment
Anthony Mann's Desperate

anthony mann desperate

I tend to view film noirs as fantasies dealing with realistic themes. As such, they don't have to be versimilitudinous representations of the way people would act in a realworld parallel (for the narratives are rarely plausible), but be symbollically suggestive of our moral situation. If Robert Mitchum or Burt Lancaster falls in love to the point of a sick obsession within 2 minutes of screen time, that's okay; it just adds to the dreamy quality of the film, while still conveying something real. What doesn't work within the oneiric narrative is Desperate's hero, Steve (Steve Brodie), and villain, Walt (Raymond Burr), consistently acting in such a dunderheaded fashion that their actions convey nothing but ill-thought out plot mechanics.

On the eve of his and Anne's (Audrey Long) 6-month anniversary, independent trucker Steve gets a job offer from an old friend, Walt. Tried and true Steve doesn't find out until he gets to the loading dock that the job is transporting stolen merchandise. He, of course, refuses, only to be persuaded at gun point. The cops show up for a shootout, allowing Steve to escape in his truck after punching out the hood who's currently in the driver's seat. Walt's brother, Al (Larry Nunn), isn't so lucky, getting knocked out and arrested. Now on the lam, Steve commits the first in a long line of convenient errors which get him where the scenarists need him to be. He leaves the hood's gun on his lap with the hood unconscious in the passenger seat. The crook wakes up, grabs the gun and forces Steve to take him to Walt's hideout. Although pure nonsense, Mann and his cinematographer, George Diskant, at least aesthetically justify these contrivances with the film's noirish set piece, where Walt and his cronies beat the tar out of Steve in a masterful chiaroscuro rendering:

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