Amoeblog

November 22, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, November 22, 2009 11:30pm | Post a Comment

Two Big Heists Hit L.A.

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, November 22, 2009 09:45pm | Post a Comment


Two noir masterpieces on the big screen in L.A!

Armored Car Robbery, despite its rather dull title, is a tight little caper masterfully led by William Talman, aka D.A. Hamilton Burger from Perry Mason. Filmed a few years before Perry started, Mr. Talman is at his finest as a cold blooded yet charming creep. His performance is my wife and I's favorite from any movie that we've seen this year, far superior to his better known role in Ida Lupino's classic Hitch-Hiker. Add in Charles McGraw, L.A. location shots, a great support cast, tight editing (67 minute running time) and you have essential B cinema!

The much more high profile Asphalt Jungle is THE heist film. I can't believe how many times it comes up in coversation with other noir fans. The archetypes created by the cast still color modern crime fiction and film. In my opinion, all of that is owed to the ensemble cast of character actors. Highlights include Jean Hagen, in a role second only to her masterful Hariette Sinton in Side Street, and the criminally underated Sam Jaffe at his most weasely. Most other top shelf caper films borrow from this John Huston masterpiece, so whether you're a fan of Resevoir Dogs or Rafifi, you need to see this film.

Monday and Tuesday (November 23rd & 24th)

Armored Car Robbery & the Asphalt Jungle

New Beverly Cinema
7165 W. Beverly Blvd.
L.A., CA 90036 
323-938-4038

SAM FULLER'S CIGARS 1

Posted by Charles Reece, November 22, 2009 09:13pm | Post a Comment
 underworld usa dolores dorn cuddles

There's something vaguely Freudian about the way Cuddles (Dolores Dorn) cools down with some ice. Image from Underworld U.S.A., available in The Samuel Fuller Collection.

Experiments In Health Care

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, November 20, 2009 11:00pm | Post a Comment
harrison baker last of the well comedians black & white don't know yetnichols and may examine doctors
three dog night hard laborcarmine appice rick derringer dnaembalming theatre exquisite cadaveric hormon cocktails
cerrone 3 supernaturenational health lp
los hispanos de peligro!experiments in destinylos graduados de locura
easystreet under the glassbobby darin doctor dolittleimpaled mondo medicale
gravy train hello doctorboris karloff arsenic and old lace rainbow jealous lover
righteous brothers re-birthtim weisberg bandufo heavy petting

We Shall Remain

Posted by Miss Ess, November 20, 2009 05:38pm | Post a Comment
we shall remain

It seems timely to think about the history of Native Americans with less than a week to go before Thanksgiving. And if you already dislike the US Government, prepare to be impressed, evenapache astounded by the lows it has sunk to...It'll make you want to deface that cool, snide Andrew Jackson staring at you from your twenty dollar bills. You will see that the arrogant United States of America has its own history of genocide, one that has been going on for hundreds of years.

I watched the entire series We Shall Remain, a set of PBS documentaries about Native Americans' history once the settlers hit the continent's shores. The films cover brutal, unsettling material that unfolds in a deft, direct manner. It covers histories of the Cherokee, Shawnee, Apache, and others in episodes entitled "After the Mayflower," "Tecumseh's Vision," "Trail of Tears," "Geronimo," and "Wounded Knee." There are definitely some major tribes missing from the series, but hopefully their stories will also accessibly be told with such care in the future. There's still about 8+ hours worth of straightforward viewing here, and the films are made from careful, studied recreations, truly haunting photos, interviews and even found footage.

The most interesting and vital pgeronimoart of the films though, I found, is definitely the interviews conducted with Native people living today. This is particularly moving during "Geronimo," when ancestors of Geronimo, Cochise and others are interviewed. Their words and stories are intense, and the gravity of what their families have experienced is devastating. It is also particularly moving during the final film of the series, "Wounded Knee," which focuses on growing Native American activism in the 70s and the 1973 occupation of Wounded Knee by the radical American Indian Movement (AIM). The interviewees' memories are so fresh, and their hope and passion for The Movement is so strong. If you think things will have gotten better for Native people after making it through the first 4 portions of this series, think again! Just because the final film covers the post- hippie 1970s doesn't mean the government is any sweeter to Native Americans.

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