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License to Confuse: Lou Barlow

Posted by Miss Ess, October 13, 2009 05:24pm | Post a Comment
sebadoh
Lou Barlow
's songs were the background music to my college experience. Actually, they were more than the background music...they were more like little saviors, tiny gems that made life a bit more bearable when things got complicated and rough. Barlow's music both described and assuaged situations I found myself surrounded with and confronting back then.

These were also my days of extreme lo-fi appreciation, and Lou was one of the musicians at the apex of my admiration. His songs were so naked. They felt real. His openness was so plain, both in music and words. Those songs were soft and hard at the same time, gentle yet defiant, the perfect combination of sweet melody and roughness -- the way so much of the best music is. I spent a lot of time with my Sebadoh records on repeat in those days, and Lou's contributions were the ones that resounded the most.

A few years ago, I met him here at Amoeba, back when Dinosaur Jr had an (awesome) instore. It was a memorable day, but my sudden nerves around him are something I kinda want to forget! Despite the fact that it'd been years since I'd even listened to those Sebadoh records, it all was still right there and fresh in my mind. Though I was directly involved with getting the band set up and onstage, I barely spoke to or even looked at Lou (which I actually think he appreciated), and in no way even attempted to even engage him in regular conversation, let alone pass on how much his music had meant to me at an important time in my life. Instead, I gabbed away with J Mascis about cereal. Yup.

Sometimes I think things are better left unsaid, and when it comes to these things, that is truly always the case. Better to talk to someone else about breakfast food and enjoy the music.

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Happy Birthday Arthur Tatum Jr., October 13th, 1909

Posted by Whitmore, October 13, 2009 12:25pm | Post a Comment
 
Art Tatum is acknowledged by anyone who knows anything as one of the greatest and most influential jazz pianists of all time. A child prodigy born with perfect pitch, Tatum was picking up church hymns and tunes off the radio by ear at the age of three. As a teenager, the nearly blind Tatum started at the Columbus School for the Blind where he studied music and learned Braille. His first musical heroes were his contemporaries like the stride pianists James P. Johnson, Fats Waller, and Earl Hines. Within a few years he was playing in New York settling at the Onyx Club where he recorded his first sides for Brunswick. Tatum developed an incredibly fast improvisational style, and though he rarely ventured far from the original melodic lines of a song, his technique and ideas are a direct line to the bebop revolution of the late 1940’s. One of Tatum’s great quotes was “There is no such thing as a wrong note.”
 
Though I’m often dubious of many opinions laid out by jazz critic Leonard Feather, I have to more or less agree with him when he called Tatum "the greatest soloist in jazz history, regardless of instrument." Legendary French writer and artist Jean Cocteau called Tatum "a crazed Chopin." Count Basie called him the eighth wonder of the world. Classical composer Sergei Rachmaninoff once said, "he has better technique than any other living pianist, and may be the greatest ever." Dizzy Gillespie said, "First you speak of Art Tatum, then take a long deep breath, and you speak of the other pianists." Charlie Parker, who briefly worked as a dishwasher at Jimmie's Chicken Shack in Manhattan, where Tatum regularly performed, once said, “I wish I could play like Tatum’s right hand!” One of the most famous quotes about Art Tatum was by Fats Waller, whose introduction one night announced, "I only play the piano, but tonight God is in the house." Waller also once said, "When that man turns on the powerhouse, don't no one play him down. He sounds like a brass band."
 
Art Tatum died in Los Angeles on March 12, 1955 at Queen of Angels Medical Center from the complications of kidney failure. He was originally interred at Angelus Rosedale Cemetery, but in 1991 he was moved to the Great Mausoleum of Glendale's Forest Lawn Cemetery.



In the Spirit Of Brendan Mullen

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, October 13, 2009 01:47am | Post a Comment

It’s been a while since I’ve written about the city I love, even though the name of this blog is called Los Angeles Me. Originally, I wanted to write about Los Angeles and the music and cultural scene of the city that you don’t hear about in most Los Angeles publications. Los Angeles has been my home for forty years now and I love it now as much as I ever have. I have been blessed to live and be a part of many communities, geographically and culturally. I’ve met some great people in L.A.; some are still here, some have moved to other cities and some have unfortunately passed on too soon.

The sudden passing of Brendan Mullen over the weekend has much of L.A.’s music community in shock. Brendan, who started The Masque in the late 70’s, was, as Paul Tollett of Goldenvoice said, "The first promoter of punk rock in this town, everything started with him." I couldn’t even begin to imagine a Los Angeles without bands such as X, The Germs, The Go-Go’s, The Weirdos and The Plugz, just to name a few that played at The Masque. The bands that played there influenced many others to not only play music, but to create art and expand their horizons. It could be said that Brendan wasn’t just valuable as far as helping music in Los Angeles grow, but that he helped the entire city grow as well. 

I met Brendan while performing at the L.A. Weekly Music Awards back in 2001. I remember he said some very complimentary things about the band I had at the time and how honored I was that he did. This was a man who not only championed the punk scene, but also all music that had the same rebellious spirit. He had a way of making you feel good about yourself, which is probably why he was such a great promoter of music.

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New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 10/16/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, October 12, 2009 02:54pm | Post a Comment


New Techno/Electro 12"s Coming This Weekend:


Etienne Jaumet
ENTROPY EP C.VANCE RX 12"
VER064

1st 12" from the ZOMBIE ZOMBIE keyboard player's album prod by CARL CRAIG!! "ENTROPY" is a meeting between ASHRA TEMPLE, CAN, LIAISONS DANGEREUSES, a TR808 & more vintage gear. Also included is a mental techno ride provided by way of a remix of "FOR FALLING ASLEEP" by CHRISTIAN VANCE.  

joakim watermelon bubblicious ep

Joakim
WATERMELON BUBBLICIOUS EP 12"
VER063

After some heavy remixes, JOAKIM is back with his own productions. "NEBULA LAUGHTER" is an epic journey influenced by italo & disco played live by his band THE DISCO. "WATERMELON BUBBLICIOUS" is the bangin electro cut for the dancefloors that rounds off his EP.


Beatfanatic ROBOTS & GUIDE EP 12" SCR018

Breakbeat Junkie 
ARTIST SERIES 10 12" GG19

Breakbeat Junkie 
ARTIST SERIES 3 12" GG09 

Da Wiesel 
BOOGALOO STOMP 12" GG04 

Funkanala 
BE THERE TOMORROW 12" HN002

Parker vs P-Zilla 
ARTIST SERIES 2 12" GG08

Pure-P 
ON MY NEW YORK SHEET-PART 2 12" GAMM056

Saag 
ROSE ROGUE 12" GAMM054 EXC 

Various 
REGROOVED 6 EP 12" GG07

Various 
REGROOVED 7 EP 12" GG10  

Crookers 
PUT YOUR HANDS ON ME 12" ECB199

Cru Jonez 
LTD ED 4 SEASONS SPRING 7" ORG7006 

Detroit Grand Pubahs 
BUTTFUNKULA RMX 12" DET10 

Kelpe 
CAMBIO WECHSEL DLP DC109LP

Lazer Sword 
GUCCI SWEATSHIRT 12" IL1001 

Munk 
BACK DOWN REMIXED-CUT COPY 12" GOMMADT004  

Snap 
2009 REMIXES 12" H2BDJS6P 

Who Made Who 
OUT THE DOOR REMIXES 12" GOMMA075

PUNK ROCK STORYTELLING TIES IN W/ BAY AREA PUNK HISTORY BOOK

Posted by Billyjam, October 12, 2009 10:30am | Post a Comment
As a kind of promotion for the recently published, long-titled new book Gimme Something Better: The Profound, Progressive, and Occasionally Pointless History of Bay Area Punk from Dead Kennedys to Green Day there will be a night of "punk rock storytelling" this evening at the  Broadway Studios featuring numerous contributors to the book, including the Avengers' Penelope Houston, Tribe 8's Lynn Breedlove, Jesse Luscious (Blatz, the Gr’ups), Johnny Strike and Hank Rank (Crime), Anna Joy Springer (Sister Spit, Cypher in the Snow), Bucky Sinister (Gilman spoken-word), Oran Canfield (the Farm), Rozz Rezabek (Negative Trend), John Geek (Fleshies, Triclops!), Chicken John (Circus Redickuless), and Kareim McKnight (Barrington/Cloyne). Following the storytelling there will be a live performance by Penelope Houston and her band.

Tonight's venue, the Broadway Studios (formerly the On Broadway), is the perfect location -- The Broadway Studios and the long gone Fab Mab (Mabuhay Gardens) downstairs from it on Broadway in San Francisco were the settings of so many legendary and memorable Bay Area punk rock concerts and events in bygone years. All those nights will be relived tonight via spoken word. Note that tonight's event is just one of a half dozen in the highly recommended series of readings to tie in with the new book, including another one on Saturday (Oct 17th) night at Gilman Street. The book, which is published by Penguin, was penned by Jack Boulware and Silke Tudor, whose many published credits include both having being contributors to the SF Weekly.

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