Amoeblog

Werewolves in Film, DVDs, Games and Music

Posted by Eric Brightwell, January 26, 2009 04:00pm | Post a Comment
 

Whilst werewolves have been the subjects of films at least as early as 1913's The Werewolf, werewolf movies has always played second fiddle to vampire movies. Heck, maybe even third fiddle, with zombies probably having overtaken them. Werewolf films are therefore like the Dr. Pepper to Zombies' Pepsi and Vampires' Coke. The Rodney Dangerfield of monsters. And yet werewolves' history, both in cinema and reality, is indelibly intertwined with other, more popular monsters. Historically, werewolves were even viewed as likely candidates for vampirism after death. And in films they have a long history of grudge matches with their undead enemies. In the past, it was usually Dracula himself vs. The Wolf Man in a series of B-movies. Now, vampires and werewolves are often depicted as members of different races of beings with ancient hatreds that play out less in the horror genre than the fantasy.
 

 

Why don't werewolves get more love? Where did it all go wrong? Maybe it's just because, for the most part, great werewolf films are few and far between -- most of the early ones, which may be the genre's Vampyr or Nosferatu, are lost. Maybe it's because werewolf films are always introducing more and more mythology to the canon, shaping and shifting our perceptions of werewolves as cunning and secretive in the silent era, to rampaging maniacs in the '40s, to Vampire hating proles in modern, dark fantasy. Beyond film, vampires have captured the black hearts of the dispossessed and pasty goth subculture in a way werewolves never have. I mean, Peter Murphy didn't sing, "Lon Chaney Jr.'s Dead." I, for one, have always identified with werewolves more than any other monster. I'm not sure why, but I think there's more to it than them being the underdogs... or wolves as it were. Plus, once (after going to bed in upstairs), I awoke in the early morning on the ground outdoors... unclothed... with bloody bits of skin under my nails and no memory of how I got there.
 

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Final Mission

Posted by phil blankenship, January 26, 2009 10:28am | Post a Comment
Final Mission action movie  Final Mission directed by Cirio H. Santiago

Final Mission plot synopsis

Thorn EMI HBO Video TVB 3001

Another Soul In The Park

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, January 26, 2009 12:55am | Post a Comment
This Wednesday Los Angeles,
don't miss this unique occasion as we welcome a warm change of pace
with the Brazilian stylings of the Funky President.


If you haven't caught on to SOUL IN THE PARK at Footsie's yet,
imagine a small local dive bar with a reputable sound system.


A room full of open-minded music lovers,
J.
Rocc sharing yet another side of his repertoire,
worldly sounds in this intimate setting --
something to be a part of.


soul012809j


SOUL IN THE PARK 13

- WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28 -

a special Brazilian set by

l_e39bb477ce864e4f952174cda7e822ac
J. ROCC of THE BEAT JUNKIES

resident selector

rani
RANI D.

Johnny "Guitar" Watson

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, January 26, 2009 12:08am | Post a Comment
I was doing some research for my next deejay set (can't talk about it or I'll jinx it, me thinks) when I stumbled on this gem of gems. It's Johnny "Guitar" Watson covering Grover Washington Jr.'s monster hit, "Mr. Magic." Watson just destroys the original easy funk version. Don't get me wrong, I love the original, but Watson trumps the o.g. version. The band is hot as well. They play tight, dress sharp and follow every move Watson makes. If I were Grover and I saw this performance, I would have said, "Damn!!!" and hoped to never to share a bill with Watson.



Ornette Coleman & James Blood Ulmer 1974

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, January 25, 2009 11:21pm | Post a Comment
I was thinking about James Blood Ulmer, who is one of my favorite guitar players. As great as musicians John Coltrane and Miles Davis were (and still are), they have many legions of imitators who sound just like them. I love Ulmer for the same reason I love Ornette Coleman and Eric Dolphy; The minute you hear Dolphy, you know it's Dolphy. No one can copy their style. It's both out and in, rooted in church blues, structured in classical music and improvisational all at the same time.

I was already a fan of James Blood Ulmer a few years back as I was playing legendary organist John Patton's album, Accent On The Blues. The song was a breezy soul jazz piece that suddenly came to life with a crazy guitar solo. I didn't even have to read the credits to know it was Ulmer, but I checked anyway. Sure enough, it was him.

I didn't know much about James Blood Ulmer's work with Ornette Coleman. I searching the internet and stumbled upon this video.The song is called "Theme from a Symphony from Dancing in Your Head." The band is Ornette on soprano sax, Blood Ulmer on guitar, Norris Sirone Jones on bass, and the late great Billy Higgins on drums. It's from 1974. I love the way the song starts. It sounds like Blood Ulmer is playing a Velvet Underground song under Ornette's sax line. Together, both musicians compliment each other as they are both heavily rooted in the blues. It is as beautiful as it is abstract. I love it!


Today James Blood Ulmer's music is less jazz and more funk/blues oriented and that great tone as morphed a bit. He sounds what I'd imagine Hendrix would have sounded like now if he was still alive. Check out some of his newer tracks on his myspace page.
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