Glen Hansard of The Frames and The Swell Season Chats

Posted by Miss Ess, May 27, 2009 01:51pm | Post a Comment
Irishman Glen Hansard's band The Frames has been quietly (at least Stateside) putting out strong, earnest rock records since the early 90s. Everything changed in 2007, when an excellent, endearing low budget indie film called Once, starring Glen and Marketa Irglova and studded with songs written by the pair, exploded into the mainstream due to massive positive word of mouth buzz. Glen and Marketa were swept along all the way to the Oscars, where they performed one of the songs from the movie, "Falling Slowly." By the end of the night they had won the Academy Award for Best Original Song! Since then, Glen and Marketa have been touring relentlessly as The Swell Season and earning rave reviews across the globe for their performances. Their backing band is often The Frames! Glen was kind enough to chat with me about his inspirations, what he's recording now, Van Morrison, and, of course, the Oscar moment. Read on for the interview:

glen hansard once

Miss Ess: You were in the studio in Feb recording -- can you tell us a little more about what you were recording and how it's sounding? What's coming up next for you?

Glen: Yes -- we [Marketa and several Frames members] were in the studio in February and March and April and finally it's done. I'm in New York right now mastering the final sequence; I'm happy with it. I'll go back to Ireland for a few days after this, swell season at amoebathen [Marketa and I] go to Korea and Japan to follow up on a tour we did recently that went well, so they invited us back to do some follow up dates. After that I think I'll rent a place in New York for the summer before going back on tour proper in late August early September.

Continue reading...

Vinyl Confidential, 1.1 – the odd order of oblong boxes

Posted by Whitmore, May 26, 2009 08:34pm | Post a Comment

Why the record boxes? Why the art work? Why the hell don’t I write more about dumpster diving? Many questions are piling up here on the ol’ TV tray…
The theory goes: Disorder increases with record collecting because we measure collecting in the direction in which disorder increases.
Any theory is always provisional, in the sense that it is only a hypothesis: you can never prove it, no matter how long you may scream into somebody’s contrarian ear, or pound your fist into a table or a disagreeing face. And no matter how many times the results of experiments agree with some theory, you can never be sure that the next time around the result will not contradict your precious little theory. But as philosopher of science Karl Popper has emphasized, a good theory is characterized by the fact that it makes a number of predictions that could in principle be disproved or falsified by observation and survive.
For example, each time a new box of records with distinctive artwork is observed to agree with the predictions, like selling quickly, that’s a good thing. The theory, ‘art covered record boxes are cool', not only survived but found revival. Hallelujah and pass the collection plate! Our confidence is increased! But if a new box, covered in great artwork, is put out on the floor yet contains only random, scratched, dusty and chipped records, sprinkled with rat poop, the resulting observations may be a bit negative. We may feel obligated to abandon or modify the theory, even though this collection of records didn’t match the usual criteria. Nevertheless the theory of ‘artwork on record boxes’ is still solid. However, amending our assumptions is not out of the question, especially if we have to deal with irate customers and a significant berating by management. A slight re-adjustment in the theory might conclude that the art work is just the carrot, and yes, you can lead a record geek to water, but without any water in the 45 box to wash down that rat poop stuck in his throat … well, you know … anyway, next time around we should just toss those ruined, scratched records in the dumpster and note; disorder increases because we tend to measure in the direction in which disorder increases.


Posted by Billyjam, May 26, 2009 01:39pm | Post a Comment
Way back in August 2006  -- a relative eternity ago in this fast-paced, ever changing Internet age -- MySpace hit the 100 million members mark, an accomplishment that blew peoples' minds at the time. That was three years ago, when MySpace was king and Facebook, while two years in existence, was still far from the force it is today. Meanwhile, Twitter was just a little baby born that year and something that comparatively few knew about. My, how things change! In March this year, a blog ranked Twitter as the fastest-growing site in the Member Communities category for February 2009 when it had an astounding growth rate of 1382%. That same month of this year Facebook enjoyed a growth rate of 228%.

Around that time, the site compiled the interesting Top 25 Social Networks Re-Rank chart (below) that Social Networking Top 25includes the monthly visits each social networking site received for the first month of this year and ranked them in popularity accordingly. Even though MySpace, the once most popular social networking website, has slipped down to the number two position and many people have deserted it in favor of Facebook, it still continues to attract new members and hang onto old ones, including countless artists and musicians.

Music makers from all genres and at various stages along in their careers, from established global acts to young aspiring rappers and rockers, all vie for attention on MySpace since is very difficult to stand apart and get noticed these days with so much competition out there.

Continue reading...

Asian-American Cinema Part VIII - the 1990s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 26, 2009 11:55am | Post a Comment
The eighth of a nine part series on Asian-Americans in front of and behind the camera


In the silent film era, a few Asian-Americans braved decidedly limited opportunities and even attempted to create a cinematic outlet for their voices. By the dawn of the sound era, Asian-American cinema disappeared and Hollywood once again controlled depictions and roles. In the post-war era, roles for Asian-American actors grew in number, if not diversity. As a result, Asian-American theater arose to fill the void, ultimately leading to the rebirth of an authentic Asian-American Cinema that grew slowly over the next two decades before expanding rapidly in the '90s and continuing in the 2000s.


The 1990s were a time of tremendous growth in the Asian-American population, resulting in a notable demographic milestone when Monterey Park became the first Asian-American majority city on the US mainland. It was soon followed by several others, including Cerritos, Cupertino, Daly City, Milpitas and Rowland Heights in California as well as Millbourne in Pennsylvania.

Continue reading...


Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 25, 2009 11:40pm | Post a Comment
nine inch nails ghosts i-iv record labelpurpose alpha & omega record labelkim carnes barking at airplanes record label
three mile pilot record labeltheory of flight record label
flyboys record label
ub40 signing of record labelglobo records labelorbit airwaves record label
scott merritt gravity is mutual record labeljet-age records labelbeulah coast is never clear record label
country music time record labelflying dutchman record labellaurie anderson mr. heartbreak record label
visa record labelwar bride record labelduran duran decade record label
BACK  <<  1292  1293  1294  1295  1296  1297  1298  1299  1300  1301  1302  1303  >>  NEXT