Amoeblog

Marxist Tales 3: Falling Stars, or When Art Imitates Art

Posted by Charles Reece, January 5, 2009 11:00pm | Post a Comment

Madonna falling in Rio back in December got me to thinking, naturally enough, about Mulholland Dr.'s use of "Llorando," Rebekah Del Rio's Spanish cover of "Crying." There's a lot of gravitas to gravity -- with one slip, the reality of artifice can be exposed. At the club Silencio, when the character of Del Rio (played by Del Rio) falls, but her singing continues, David Lynch is playing around with Bertolt Brecht's epic theater and his notion of estrangement. By having the work remind the audience of the layer of representation intervening between them and the emotions they're experiencing, Brecht hoped to create a more politico-rationally engaged experience -- that is, one of empathy, not sympathy (the former being of intellectual understanding, not the latter's identification).

rebekah del rio mulholland dr.naomi watts laura harring mulholland dr.

However, Lynch turns estrangement on its ear by using lip-synching as the emotional crux of his film. If you'll remember, the scene occurs at the point where the fugue world of Betty is fracturing, and the reality of Diane is seeping in. Diane had killed her lover, Camilla, out of jealousy, replacing her in the dream with the amnesiac Rita. Of course Rita can't remember who she is, because she's a manifestation of Diane's oneiric state, a displacement of Camilla, with all the bad stuff repressed. As Rita, she's a ghost, pure desideratum, or Diane's objective (objectified) correlative of the real deal. (In fact, the same applies to Betty; she's Diane's idealized self.) Just as the illusion of the film's representational quality is most exposed (Lynch's "eye of the duck" scene), Betty and Rita begin sobbing -- and (provided the Silencio sequence works properly) the audience along with them.

Continue reading...

BEST, WORST & MOST OVERRATED FILMS OF 2008

Posted by Charles Reece, December 28, 2008 07:35pm | Post a Comment
~ THE BEST ~

If You Disagree On These Two, You'd Be Wrong

synecdoche new york posterdark knight joker poster

For Some Realism

boy a poster
rachel getting married postergran torino poster

For Some Comedy

burn before reading posterin bruges posterrocknrolla poster

For Some (More) Fantasy

let the right one in posterfall poster

~ YOU KIDDIN' ME? ~

milk posterwall-e posterwrestler poster

~ LOW FIBER STOOL CONTENT ~

wackness posterjcvd posterreligulous posterlakeview terrace poster

~ MOST SOUL-DRAINING TRAILERS ~

doubt postercurious case of benjamin buttons posterrevolutionary road posterfrost nixon poster

~ MASTERFULLY FULFILLED WORTHLESS INTENTION ~

slumdog millionaire poster

OVERBITES, BELLIES & BIG BUTTS

Posted by Charles Reece, December 13, 2008 10:05pm | Post a Comment
One of my favorite comics artists, Dave Cooper, provides the artwork for a new music video, which looks great -- but I warn you, mute the sound:


Danko Jones - King Of Magazines from Bad Taste Records on Vimeo.

Which came first, the love of comics or the big butt fetish? Anyway, comics work doesn't pay for shit, so Cooper now does illustration work and stuff like the above.

Here are his comics in the 'el' series, all of them as good as pop culture ever gets. They're perverse in the best sense of the word [click to enlarge]:



Note that body conscious David Cronenberg wrote an intro to Ripple, so that should tell you something about Cooper's brand of humor. Some of his oil paintings [click to enlarge]:



Here's his new website, which doesn't have much on it, yet, so here's his old site. And here's an interview with the man by Patrick McKeown, another great comics artist who rarely does comics.

The Gadget Laid Bare: Some Rambling Thoughts On Quantum of Solace (2008), Liberalism, Montage, Stalin's Aesthetics and A.I.

Posted by Charles Reece, December 6, 2008 07:26pm | Post a Comment
Sean Connery James Bond Ursula AndressDaniel Craig James Bond bathing suit beach

I'm not much of a James Bond fanatic; I can take him or leave him, and have tended towards the latter for the past 20 years of installments. I grew up on the Roger Moore version, but the problem with the Quantum of Solace upcoming posterfranchise started there, only getting worse with each new Bond film. Too many gadgets and too many one-liners were used to cover the fact that Sean Connery had been replaced with a bunch of pantywaists (except George Lazenby, but his reign ended after one film). Not that there's anything wrong with wit, it's just that in an action film it should be backed with the assurance of brawn. That's why Christian Bale makes for a better Batman than Michael Keaton or George Clooney. No matter how editing might be able to slice and dice the action sequences, there's always going to be an aesthetic flaw in any machismo-centered film where the physiognomy and somatotype of the lead don't meet the iconic demands of the hero. (Just consider two recent examples: fresh-faced fratboy Matt Damon playing a badass in the Bourne Trilogy and pipsqueak Freddy Rodriguez as a renegade secret ops soldier in Planet Terror.)

Jean-Claude Van Damme, Critical Darling: The Mythopoiesis of JCVD (2008)

Posted by Charles Reece, November 22, 2008 07:18pm | Post a Comment
The white meat is on the run
and the dark meat is far too done
and the milkman left me a note yesterday
get out of this town by noon
you're coming on way too soon
and besides that we never liked you anyway.
-- "Sweet Revenge" by John Prine (with a nod to Hunter S. Thompson) 
 

Who'dathunk it, but the Muscles from Brussels has finally starred in a film that's been getting some good critical response. JCVD is an attempt to explore the heart and mind of Jean-Claude Varenberg, the man behind the dissipating Van Damme legend. Director and co-writer Mabrouk El Mechri might've called the film I'm Not There had the title not already been taken. It's a pomo-biopic trying for more versimiltude than Being John Malcovich, but any honesty in the film is more of an accidental byproduct of the essential cluelessness of its eponymous star than the result of actual introspection. 'Tis the the age of schadenfreude, and that's why I went to see this film. As Dostoevsky said, we love "the disgrace of the righteous man," only Van Damme ain't righteous, just famous. As he admits in the movie, he's just a commodity, who's benefited greatly from being so. The film asks us to care about the toy that starts feeling suffocated by its packaging. The resulting drama, however, comes closer to a VH1 special about a boy band member deciding he's a real artist. If you were crying along with Dave Mustaine in Some Kind of Monster or get choked up reguarly watching Oprah give shit away to bourgeois housewives, then JCVD might be something other than comedy relief. This is a date movie for WWE fans.

BACK  <<  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  >>  NEXT