Amoeblog

Masked Vengeance: Super (2011)

Posted by Charles Reece, April 17, 2011 08:22pm | Post a Comment
super poster boltie

In Dan Clowes' Death-Ray, the titular hero doesn't discover a greater sense of responsibility with his newfound powers (à la Peter Parker), only a fascistic resolve in settling petty grievances. James Gunn uses a similar approach in critiquing the superhero costume in Super. His heroes, The Crimson Bolt and Boltie, aren't super-powered, just a couple of individuals who wear masks and deliver vigilante justice -- in a word, sociopaths. Just like Batman, the mask is used to disguise a personal revenge motive: a drug dealer has wooed away The Bolt's wife not through some mind-control apparatus, but because the dealer is better looking and his life more enticing than the hero's secret identity as a fry cook. The film takes every right turn, mixing pathos and humor, demented fantasy and realistic violence, convention and critique into one of the best dark comedies about the depressing nature of fanboy fetishism we're likely to get. Much better than Suckerpunch.

Post-Marxist Entertainment: Theodor Ushev's Drux Flux (2008)

Posted by Charles Reece, April 10, 2011 10:54pm | Post a Comment

I've been afflicted with sinus problems for the past few days, so my brain ain't working so well. I did, however,
discover this great animated short based on Herbert Marcuse's
One-Dimensional Man.

The Late, Great Sidney Lumet

Posted by Charles Reece, April 9, 2011 09:18am | Post a Comment

The opening sequence from Sidney Lumet's The Fugitive Kind. He died this morning.

The Late, Great Farley Granger

Posted by Charles Reece, March 29, 2011 09:21am | Post a Comment

Farley Granger as Phillip, a man with a secret, in Alfred Hitchock's Rope. He died.

The Sacred Juggalo Aesthetic: A Family Underground (2009)

Posted by Charles Reece, March 28, 2011 01:03am | Post a Comment
juggalo family arm tattoo

"Look at us now," Joe lamented in his often moving 2003 autobiography, Behind the Paint. "We're still scrubs. No Grammys, no Hollywood parties, no celebrity appearances, none of that. We just don't count. Even after selling 5 million albums, we just don't count. It's in our blood. For eternity, we're gonna be the fucking underdog. No matter what happens."
-- Violent Jay on being Hip Hop's homo sacer, from the LA Weekly interview

At the two extreme limits of the order, the sovereign and homo sacer present two symmetrical figures that have the same structure and are correlative: the sovereign is the one with respect to whom all men are potentially homines sacri, and homo sacer is the one with respect to whom all men act as sovereigns ["sacred in the antithetical sense of the word now all but lost to us, ... accursed, at the mercy of all."].
-- Giorgio Agamben, quoted by Hal Foster

For it is the original exclusion of homo sacer, Agamben contends, that authorises the sovereign and ‘founds the city of men’; this act forges ‘the originary “political” relation’. 
-- Foster explaining the foundational role of scrubs, ibid.

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