Amoeblog

SF at the AFI Fest

Posted by Charles Reece, November 1, 2011 09:37pm | Post a Comment
afi fest 2011 poster

Among the standard schlocky dramas (J. Edgar), this year's AFI Festival has surprisingly quite a few works of speculative fiction. Here are the trailers:


Beyond the Black Rainbow


Melancholia


Carré Blanc


Extraterrestrial


Target

Overall, there's a lot more decent genre material than in years past, and it's free.

It's Halloween, So Here's My Interview with Guillermo del Toro

Posted by Charles Reece, October 31, 2011 07:32pm | Post a Comment

We mostly talk about fantasy.

Having Fun with Stalin: Žižek on Rose

Posted by Charles Reece, October 30, 2011 08:58am | Post a Comment
slavoj zizek charlie rose

When I'm not looking for videos of Danzig or pro-wrestling, watching Slavoj Žižek is how I spend a good deal of my internet time. He recently appeared on The Charlie Rose Show. Turns out, the two share an interest in Josef Stalin. But that discussion gets interrupted with topics like the philosopher's speech at the Occupy Wall Street rally, the Egyptian uprising -- both of which are the focus of his latest LRB essay -- Chinese capitalism and the ideology in Kung Fu Panda and Titanic. The Titanic analysis is a taste of what's to come in his and Sophie Fiennes' sequel to The Pervert's Guide to Cinema:

pervert's guide to ideology

The Marriage Plot: Lucky McKee and Jack Ketchum's The Woman (2011)

Posted by Charles Reece, October 16, 2011 10:29pm | Post a Comment
the woman poster

Having never seen Offspring (Andrew van den Houten and Jack Ketchum's adaptation of the latter's novel about a Northeastern cannibalistic kin, who first appeared in the book Off-Season), I took its sequel's opening pre-credit sequence to be a phantasmagoric continuation of I Spit On Your Grave where the eponymous Woman retreated into nature after having escaped the tyranny of Man and patriarchal culture. Surely, Lucky McKee and Ketcham's The Woman is more than an accidental synecdoche for the original title of Meir Zarchi's classic, Day of the Woman. Their film is, at its core, another rape-revenge film, but with the twist that the victim is feral, so outside of man's law. The misogynistic repression perforce comes from a different place than horror's generic South, since its resident hayseed hordes are uncultured and would likely sympathize with the bestial Woman. Zarchi's victim-protagonist Jennifer HIll, on the other hand, was an urbane writer who had culture stripped from her by barbarous rednecks. The Woman has just as much dirt under her fingernails as those rednecks, her language isn't much more than a growl, plus she's a cannibal (a taboo even greater than the use of the contraction "y'all"). Therefore, her victimization is a form of structural violence, that which is the repressed base of the status quo. The central fear expressed by The Woman isn't in having the Woman's culture dismantled (as it was for Jennifer) -- for she is pure cultural Other and has none -- but that cultural normativity is structured around the primordial violence she represents. Hillbillies can't victimize her any more than animals can victimize other animals, but the nuclear family can in the same way that a suburban adolescent might torture a cat.

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Choking Whiteness: Bone aka Housewife (1972)

Posted by Charles Reece, October 10, 2011 03:21am | Post a Comment
bone housewife poster


Given my recent essay on Whiteness in alien invasion flicks, I can't think of a better film example than Larry Cohen's Bone (aka Housewife) that demonstrates the way Whiteness is defined negatively through its imaginary other, Blackness. So here's a review from the past of that movie:

Replace the repressed white male anger of Fight Club with that of the repressed white housewife’s in order to explore the terrain of Jungle Fever and you get the gist of writer/director Larry Cohen’s debut. Instead of fitting squarely within the genre of blaxploitation, the film examines some of the stereotypical representations of the black male which helped make the genre possible to begin with. 

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