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Album Picks: PJ Harvey, Kevin Morby, Cate Le Bon

Posted by Billy Gil, April 15, 2016 11:57am | Post a Comment

PJ Harvey The Hope Six Demolition Project

pj harvey the hope six demolition project lpPJ Harvey’s ninth album was recorded in sessions that were open to the public at the museum Somerset House in London. Exhibit attendees could see Harvey creating the album with producers Flood and John Parish through a one-way mirror. The results continue in her tradition of excellence, producing songs that sound lush and layered, yet loose and free, with a strong social commentary running through on songs like “The Wheel” (“Now you see them, now you don’t,” she sings of disappeared and killed children around the world). Harvey wrote these 10 songs after she traveled to Kosovo, Afghanistan and Washington, D.C., for inspiration, and the kind of oppression and suffering she witnessed fuels her songwriting, as she sings of “the pain of 50 million years” on “The Orange Monkey” and in “The Community of Hope,” in which her criticism of rebuilt housing projects that displaced residents who could no longer afford it drew the ire of D.C. politicians. Though the composition of Hope Six is certainly interesting and proves Harvey continues to be a firebrand, ultimately the final product is what matters most to fans. Thankfully, the music is as powerful as ever. As can attest the muscular guitars that back songs “The Ministry of Defense,” the wailing sax that tears through “The Ministry of Social Affairs,” the rousing choruses her band delivers throughout the album and Harvey’s soulful vocals that close out the album on “Dollar, Dollar,” The Hope Six Demolition Project more than delivers on its premise.

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Three Days 'Til Record Store Day: J Dilla's 'Diary,' Run the Jewels' Virtual Reality Viewer

Posted by Billy Gil, April 13, 2016 05:18pm | Post a Comment

j dilla the diary lp record store day 7"Hip hop heads have a few reasons to celebrate on Record Store Day April 16.

First off, a new posthumous release from the late, great artist and producer J Dilla will be released on LP that day. The Diary comes out on CD and cassette the day before, but April 16’s vinyl release will come with a free 7” inside that includes the song “The Ex” (featuring Bilal) plus an R&B version of the song on the B-side. The song is a Pete Rock production.

The story behind the lost album is that J Dilla (real name James Dewitt Yancey) recorded an album’s worth of vocals back in 2002 that were ultimately shelved his parent label. That lead Yancey to break from the major label system and leave Detroit for California, where he produced his classics Ruff Draft, Jaylib's Champion Sound and Donuts.

Now, following Yancey’s death in 2006, his estate has been trying to get the album released for years. Finally, the album is coming out, with production from Madlib, Pete Rock, Hi-Tek, Nottz, House Shoes, Supa Dave West, Bink! and Karriem Riggins, and guest spots from Bilal, Frank N Dank, Boogie and others.

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Four Days 'Til Record Store Day: Disney Crosley Turntable and Disney Songs Vinyl

Posted by Billy Gil, April 12, 2016 03:37pm | Post a Comment
UPDATE: These Disney Crosley turntables are still available post-Record Store Day. Come into Amoeba Hollywood and pick one up, or buy it here.


Record Store Day
is a mere four days away. This Saturday, April 16, RSD will take over our stores, with exclusive releases, DJ sets, fun activities and more. See a list of all the releases coming out that day here.

One of the coolest things coming out on RSD is this Disney Mickey Mouse Crosley Cruiser turntable. Similarly to the Crosley turntable from last year that featured the Peanuts gang, this one has Mickey Mouse and Pluto, imagining Mickey as a vinyl-collecting hipster. But it's also kind of like that first turntable you had when you were a kid — nostalgia!

We've got it in the warehouse now. Check out some pictures below. It's like an old school version of those unboxing videos.

disney crosley

 

disney turntabledisney crosley turntable

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Album Picks: Parquet Courts, Tim Hecker, Woods

Posted by Billy Gil, April 8, 2016 11:25am | Post a Comment

Parquet CourtsHuman Performance

parquet courts human performance lp“Dust is everywhere — SWEEP!” So goes the refrain of the first single off N.Y. indie-rock heroes Parquet Courts’ new album. Human Performance seems less concerned with proving anything to anyone than ever, yet finds the band settling into itself nicely and coming up with some of its most weirdly catchy songs. Since releasing the excellent Light up Gold in 2013, the band has fallen into a certain lineage of brainy New York indie rock of yore, from Talking Heads and Television through Sonic Youth and the Beastie Boys. Then came Sunbathing Animal, the thorny but ultimately winning follow-up, along with assorted albums and EPs that saw them trying on various guises, with the results thrillingly mercurial but hit-or-miss as far as listening goes. Now, on songs like the Velvet Underground-ish title track; short, rhythmically clever tunes like “Outside” and “I Was Just Here”; and shoutalong slacker anthems like “Paraphrased”; and verbose Nuggets jams like "Berlin Got Blurry," Parquet Courts sound comfortable yet energized, mature but real in their embrace of the surreal and off-kilter. As it’s been somewhat both exhilarating and maddening to watch them over the past couple of years, Human Performance is that redemptive album that shows keeping an eye on Parquet Courts is well worth your time. Their best yet. Read my interview with the band a couple of years back, and check out their episode of “What’s In My Bag?” below, along with the video for “Berlin Got Blurry.”

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Album Picks: Charles Bradley, Explosions in the Sky, Bleached, Andrew Bird, Frankie Cosmos

Posted by Billy Gil, April 1, 2016 11:49am | Post a Comment

Charles Bradley - Changes

charles bradley changes lpSoul master Charles Bradley’s third album for Daptone is a knockout. Beginning with a genuine interlude of “God Bless America,” the album positions Bradley as someone who has gone though career and personal difficulty and come out on top, sounding upbeat and grateful to be alive and working. On “Good to Be Back Home,” Bradley flips things to explore the dual nature of home and what that means, singing of being back in the land where he was born, “sometimes it hurt so bad, sometimes, so good,” before unleashing a howl that better expresses the notion than any words could. That passion runs through the heartfelt and extremely affecting love songs like “Nobody But You.” Throughout, the Menahan Street Band’s expertly played and recorded horns and jazz grooves deliver the ideal backdrop, while there’s some experimentation beyond classic soul on tracks like “Ain’t Gonna Give It Up,” its moog and bass-drum-heavy groove reminiscent of krautrockers like Can. And if you don’t get goosebumps during Bradley’s cover of Black Sabbath ballad “Changes,” check your pulse. A playful flexibility within the carefully cultivated classic soul sound Bradley and many Daptone artists work within proves to be incredibly fruitful here. It’s Bradley’s best release yet from his second wind, as Bradley remains an expert at getting to the heart of soul music.

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