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'Turn Up the Radio' Features L.A. Rock on Film at The Egyptian

Posted by Billy Gil, August 8, 2014 03:30pm | Post a Comment
james brown the t.a.m.i. show
James Brown performs in The T.A.M.I. Show

 

Amoeba is sponsoring The American Cinematheque’s film series Turn Up the Radio, which covers the intersection of music and media, rock and pop in Los Angeles during the birth of rock ‘n’ roll, from 1956 to 1972. The shows run Aug. 13-17, and you can get tickets here. General admission tickets are $11.

The films in the series cast a light on L.A. as a cultural zeitgeist during a time of great upheaval in pop culture, in concordance with one of the programmers Harvey Kubernik’s new book, Turn Up the Radio!, covering such iconic artists as The Doors, The Seeds and Frank Zappa. Kubernik will be signing his book in the lobby of the Egyptian at 6:30 p.m. Thursday and Saturday. The series is co-sponsored by Santa Monica Press.

the doorsWednesday Aug. 13 sees The Doors: Live at the Bowl ’68, covering the band’s triumphant Hollywood Bowl show on July 5, 1968, just as their classic album Waiting for the Sun was released, playing such classics as “Light My Fire,” “Hello, I Love You” and “The End.” The film is directed by Doors organist Ray Manzarek and has been restored and remixed by the band’s longtime engineer, Bruce Botnick. The show starts at 7:30 with a slide show by rock photographer Henry Diltz, followed by the film at 8. Watch a remastered clip of the band performing "Light My Fire" at the Bowl in '68 here.

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Show Recap: Spoon at Amoeba Hollywood

Posted by Billy Gil, August 8, 2014 02:33pm | Post a Comment

spoon britt daniels amoeba hollywoodI was curious to hear how Spoon’s sonically brilliant new album would come across live. Though they’ve always been a solid, rhythmically interesting band, producer David Fridmann gave the band an extra something special on this new album that made them really come alive on record.

Live, the album’s varied songs really popped, from the workmanlike “Rent I Pay” to the thumping yet introspective “Inside Out.” Clearly, the band is as enamored of their new songs as are critics, as the band counted off songs gleefully and seemed to up the volume of the groove every time for maximum impact.

spoon they want my soul cdThough they’re an engaging live band, Spoon are also knob twiddlers at heart, and by the third song, the space-Motown of “Rainy Taxi,” their sound had been perfected, erupting into a noise break at the end. Britt Daniels was reliably on throughout, his gritty vocals cutting through a loud mix.

It was great to hear the band bust out “I Turn My Camera On” (from 2005’s Gimme Fiction), the song’s carefully cultivated beat serving as a nice counterpoint to their noisier new material, as well as the comparable “Small Stakes” (from 2002’s Kill the Moonlight). The songs served as a reminder of Spoon’s many strong albums—remember the Beatlesesque “Don't Make Me a Target,” from 2007’s excellent Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga? It sounded great, even if Daniels seemed frustrated for a moment while on his knees wailing on the guitar (funny, since he could just stand still, looking and sounding perfect and people would be happy).

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Weekly Roundup: Pyramid Vritra, Medicine, Tomorrows Tulips, Part Time

Posted by Billy Gil, August 8, 2014 10:04am | Post a Comment

Pyramid Vritra – “Track 3”

pyramid vritraPyramid Vritra (aka Hal Williams) is one of my favorite young rapper/producers around L.A., having released the excellent Indra earlier this year on Stones Throw. Now he’s got a new EP out called Palace, with each of its six songs representing a corridor or room in a house. I’d say “Track 3” is like an elegant living room with sun filtering through the windows. Williams’ goal with the new EP was to shift attention to his flow and storytelling abilities, which are often folded into his dazzling productions. Yet “Track 3” features some truly psychedelic rhymes and wordplay that is fun to get lost in. It’s like he says himself: “He never ever be what you predicted, listen.”

 

Medicine – “Turning”

medicine home everywhere lpWell Medicine sure don’t seem to be slowing down on their second go-around. After the L.A.-based shoegaze greats reunited and released their first album in 20 years, the excellent To the Happy Few, last year, they’ve already got another one headed our way. Rather than continue riding ’90s nostalgia waves, the band has augmented their sound with Brazilian-inspired sounds and rhythms, as can be heard on the first single “Turning,” which bounces on a rumbling rhythm but remains defiantly ’gazey and psychedelic, like a post-punk Os Mutantes. Home Everywhere is due Oct. 28 on Captured Tracks.

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Weekly Wednesday Steal: tUnE-yArDs' 'Nikki Nack' on Red Vinyl for $10

Posted by Billy Gil, August 5, 2014 11:23am | Post a Comment

tune-yards nikki nack red vinylAmoeba's new Weekly Wednesday Steal continues this Wednesday Aug. 6 with tUnE-yArDs' acclaimed new album, Nikki Nack, for only $10 (normally $19.98) on Amoeba.com.

The Wednesday Steal sees some awesome piece go on sale for only $10 on Amoeba.com every Wednesday (while supplies last). As always, there’s free shipping on all music and movies you buy on Amoeba.com throughout the United States. The offer is only online, not in stores.

On Nikki Nack, tUnE-yArDs’ Merrill Garbus take her highwire vocals and playful experimentation to more palatable pop songs. Check out the playground chants of "Water Fountain" below:

Can Reissues Headed Our Way Starting in September

Posted by Billy Gil, August 5, 2014 10:44am | Post a Comment

can bandCan you believe it??

Krautrock titans Can will reissue 14 catalog albums on vinyl for the first time in more than a decade, starting with the classics Ege Bamyasi, Tago Mago, Monster Movie and Soundtracks. Those are out Sept. 2 on Mute.

Oct. 7 brings Future Days, Soon Over Babaluma, Landed, Flow Motion amd Saw Delight (the latter of which includes a CD).

Oct. 21 we have Can, Delay, Out Of Reach (including the album for the first time on CD), Rite Time and Unlimited Edition.

On Nov. 4 the band will release The Lost Tapes as five individual LPs. Previously it was only available as a box set.

Can was formed in 1968, releasing their debut album, Monster Movie, in 1969 with Malcolm Mooney on vocals, first introducing their sense of experimentation and layering that would go on to be perfected on the band’s masterpieces, 1971’s Tago Mago and 1972’s Ege Bamyasi. Soundtracks, released in 1970, marked the beginning of Damo Suzuki as the band’s vocalist and compiled tracks written for various films.

Can’s influence would of course go on to be felt immediately, creating the so-called “krautrock” sound alongside loosely associated German bands of the late '60s and early '70s like Neu! and Faust with driving 4/4 beats and layers of sound built around simple structures, as well as later, influencing acts such as Radiohead, Stereolab, Portishead, New Order, Kanye West and countless others. If it’s your first time to the band, these Sept. 2 releases are a good place to start.

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