Amoeblog

LETTERMAN SHOW POSTING YOUTUBER MANGOFACE247

Posted by Billyjam, January 24, 2008 01:20pm | Post a Comment
letterman
If you go on YouTube and do a search under the Late Show with David Letterman, odds are that within the first few results netted in your seach will be a clip of the Letterman show posted by active YouTube member MangoFace247. One of several YouTube members who religiously post Letterman clips, MangoFace247 has been a member since last July when he began posting clips with the Letterman show as his specialty. Since then he has posted over 220 clips, an average of one a day, selectively choosing Letterman monologue, interview, and live performance clips to post on YouTube, which he will usually do within hours or by the following day of the actual TV broadcast. 

But it was one particular Letterman posting that catapulted MangoFace247 to fame (in YouTube land)  when on September 28th, 2007 he uploaded the Paris HIlton interview where Letterman grilled the pouting heiress on her jail stint (which she clearly did not wish to discuss). This clip (below), which he had posted on YouTube even before CBS, created a buzz and ended up getting well over four million hits-- even more than the original broadcast itself. (Note that on average Letterman TV broadcasts get 3.6 million viewparis hilton on lettermaners nightly.)

It also made MangoFace247 an instant YouTube celebrity. His name was linked to Paris Hilton's and he was mentioned in gossip columns in papers like the New York Post. I recently caught up with the anonymous "Mango" (who likes to remain incognito but did say that he lives in LA and works in the music business, and also that he sells T-shirts online) via YouTube messages and email to interview him for the Amoeblog.

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IN CELEBRATION OF THE DRUM: PART SIX, TWO DRUMMER BANDS

Posted by Billyjam, January 23, 2008 09:00am | Post a Comment

Q: In a rock band what could be better than hearing the drummer banging out a killer rhythm?
A: How about two drummers?

Most popular with groups formed in the seventies, the phenomenon of bands with two drummers -- each with their own full drum kits set up live and/or in recording sessions -- have included the Allman Brothers with drummers Jai Johany Johansen & Butch Trucks, the Doobie Brothers, the Grateful Dead with Mickey Hart & Bill Kruetzman, .38 Special, the Outlaws, Genesis (post Peter Gabriel as in the above clip from 1976 with dual percussionists Bill Buford and a bearded/pre vocal pop sensation Phil Collins), (for part of their career) space rockers Hawkwind, King Crimson (in the nineties), Foreigner, Yes, Adam & the Ants, and the more contemporary rock group Modest Mouse. Note that some of these only occasionally/sporadically utilize the two drummer set up.
               













The advantage of having two drummers varies depending on who you ask. In fact, many believe that it is just plain unnecessary -- that if one drummer is good enough, that he/she can do an adequate job alone. There are many reasons to utilize two drummers, including that together two drummers can create a more full big beat sound and groove, that they can switch up types of drums each play, and that together they can really speed up the tempo.

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IN CELEBRATION OF THE DRUM: PART FIVE, THE ROOT OF ALL MUSIC:

Posted by Billyjam, January 22, 2008 07:52am | Post a Comment

To me, the drum or percussion is the basis of all music. I believe that the drum has to have been the original instrument played by our earliest forefathers on this earth. All they needed was a stick and some (preferably hollow) object to bang out a rhythm on. In fact, they didn't even need that when they had their mouths to make percussive sounds with, a la Biz Markie.

In fact, I would bet money that at the beginning of human life on this earth -- long, long, long before hip-hop was born in the Boogie Down Bronx there were some cavemen in a circle (who couldn't even articulate words to communicate with one another) making music with their mouths, primitive beat-boxing.

And to this day there is some distinctive quality about the drum that is automatically universally communicative, not to mention healing. Everyone  understands and feels the drum, even if they don't speak each others' language. That is why, I believe, house or electronic music, which is typically vocal-less and based on rhythm, is the most popular (even over hip-hop) on a global scale. People of all races and backgrounds can readily relate to the hypnotic, tribal feel of the drum. For proof, go sit in or nearby a drum circle in any place in the world.

So for this fifth installment in the ongoing In Celebration of the Drum Amoeblog series, I say let the drummer get wicked, well wicked -- in the form of these three great video clips including the French beatboxer Joseph, the Japanese drummers whose formal attire should not fool you into thinking they can't get funky, and the wonderful American marching band, hip-hop drummers in the clip on top of this Amoeblog.

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ANGRY AMOEBLOGGER RANTS ON BUSH, PUNK, AND THE 80's

Posted by Billyjam, January 19, 2008 11:00am | Post a Comment

Man! I miss the eighties. I miss the 1980's mainly for the music and the vibe surrounding it. Yes in-fuckin-deed!

Perhaps even more than the hip-hop of that decade (which I love to death), I miss the American punk rock of the 1980's even more.

I miss 80's US punk because the music was still fresh and vibrant and hard(core). It was when punk itself was still an ideal that hadn't been fully exploited yet, not some fuckin pre-packaged commodity hawked as a fashion accessory at the Hot Topic outlet down at the local strip mall USA. 

Back then punk zines from MRR all the way down to every small but passionately put together two-page Xeroxed, circulation of ten had balls. And near everything related to punk, from zines to album covers to concert fliers and of course the music/lyrics itself, had a strong scent of political activism. And the one thing that seemed to cement everything together? The president at the time: Ronald Reagan. 

If you've forgotten who Reagan was, let me refresh your memory. He was a former governor of California who made some bad decisions but still became president of the USA. Reagan was (like George W. Bush) a Republican and (also like Bush) someone that folks liked to mock and imitate and disdain. He liked jellybeans. He asked "where's the beef?" and (like Bush) was the puppet of corrupt big business powers behind the scenes. 

And at that time it seemed every punk rock group had a song or album or show flier about Reagan. I thought of this when I went crate-digging in my punk section this morning and dug up my copy of the great Alternative Tentacles compilation Let Them Eat Jellybeans and also an album by the great former band Reagan Youth -- just two examples of punk releases fueled by their contempt towards the then-president of the USA.
reagan youth
Reagan Youth, which was formed in Queens, NY by Dave "Insurgent" Rubinstein and Paul "Cripple" Bakija, used to play bills with the likes of the Dead Kennedys and Bad Brains (both on the Jellybeans comp on Jello Biafra's label).

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CORNELIUS' "BAD TASTE" IN MOVIES IS GOOD

Posted by Billyjam, January 18, 2008 07:31am | Post a Comment
cornelius
We all know that Planet of the Apes is musician/producer Cornelius' favorite movie since the Japanese artist, born Keigo Oyamada, chose his pseudonym in tribute to the character Cornelius from that movie. Not only that, but he also went so far as to  name his son Milo after Milo -- the son of Cornelius in Planet of the Apes. 

But the artist, whose current five-date US tour titled the Sensous Synchronized Show played at Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles last night and plays the Fillmore in San Francisco tonight (Friday 18th), has a lot of other favorite movies on his list -- maybe not all as close to his heart as Planet of the Apes is to him, but faves nonetheless.

So when yesterday I got the opportunity to interview him (via his translator) and ask a few questions, I had to ask-- what is another movie that he likes a lot? His reply? Something that would no doubt please Amoeblog's Phil Blankenship and other fans of horror and gore -- sprinkled with some humor. He named the 1987 New Zealand b-horror movie classic Bad Taste directed by (and also acting in the film in the role of Derek)  Peter Jackson -- who would later come to megafame as the director of the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

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