Amoeblog

RON ENGLISH'S POP ART

Posted by Billyjam, November 20, 2007 07:12pm | Post a Comment


The title of prolific modern artist Ron English's book Son of Pop - Ron English Paints His Progeny pretty much explains the content of his recommended brand new 100-page, full color art book recently published by San Francisco's 9mm Books. Inside are paintings in the artist's usual irreverent, anti-corporate style (McDonalds and the tobacco industry being two of his favorite targets), only using his two children (Zephyr age 12 and Mars age 9 -- aka "the Kiss kids") as his subjects.  For more information on the illustrious artist Ron English, who describes his work as "popaganda" and whose body of work and history is too long to go in to here, I recommend you check out his website or pick up the documentary about him, also titled Popaganda. Meantime, check out the selections of his art here and also read the interview he recently conducted with the AMOEBLOG about the new book Son Of Pop which also includes a mini 4-song CD featuring his same two kids singing such songs as Wesley Willis' "Rock and Roll McDonalds."

AMOEBLOG: When exactly were the paintings in Son of Pop made?                                                         

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IT'S ALL ABOUT THE KIDS, MAN...AND THE KIDS LOVE DAF

Posted by Billyjam, November 20, 2007 05:37pm | Post a Comment

GUITAR HERO IS, LIKE, SO LAST WEEK

Posted by Billyjam, November 17, 2007 11:00am | Post a Comment

Harmonix Music Systems
' ever-popular Guitar Hero series is, like, so last week. Move over Guitar Hero and make way for Triangle Hero above and Cowbell Hero below.

AMOEBITE PROFILE: TIM RANOW

Posted by Billyjam, November 16, 2007 09:33am | Post a Comment

TOP THREE MOST REQUESTED THINGS AT AMOEBA MUSIC HOLLYWOOD'S INFORMATION COUNTER THIS WEEK ACCORDING TO TIM RANOW:

#3 - parking ticket validation

#2 - green Amoeba dollar off coupons.

#1 - directions to th
e Amoeba public
        restroom
(there isn't one.)

AMOEBLOG:
Tim, how long have you worked at Amoeba, what is your job at the store, and how exactly did you end up working at Amoeba Music Hollywood?

TIM RANOW: I lived with Laurie W. in San Francisco in the Santiago Party House for six years. We hosted several Amoeba get-togethers. I got booted from Wired magazine and decided to move to Los Angeles. Amoeba and I seemed to have a lot in common, so we formed a special something. I've been at the Hollywood store since 2001. I'll be celebrating my 47th anniversary with Amoeba in 2048! I'm an information person at Amoeba. I'll figure out what the name of that country singer you're looking for is even if you only know that his name might be John or Ronnie and his last name might have the letter "J" in it somewhere. Then I'll tell you where you can find it used on cassette tape because I know your money is tight. I remember that your cousin isn't allowed CDs in prison due to the inherent shankiness factor.

AMOEBLOG:  And what's good about working at Amoeba?

TIM: I
work with talented and wondrous people in the funnest [sic] and coolest environment ever! People get really excited visiting where I'm getting paid to be. That is pretty rad!
blind willie mctell
AMOEBLOG:  What's a good place to grab a bite nearby Amoeba?

TIM:
Arby's, located at 5920 W Sunset Blvd Los Angeles.
            
AMOEBLOG: How would you describe the LA music and/or arts community to people who know nothing about living in LA?

TIM RANOW:
It's implosive!

AMOEBLOG: What do you think will be the future of the music biz and how people get their new music?

TIM:
I'll tell you what I tell pshaun cassidyeople at the information counter when asked this question: Please hold.

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FORT GRAFFITI, MARIN HEADLANDS

Posted by Billyjam, November 15, 2007 05:37pm | Post a Comment



  















 








The first thing that you notice when you walk through the long, dimly-lit tunnels that lead to Battery Townsley which sits atop the hills on the Marin Headlands is that there's something missing: a certain smell. There is no smell of pee. Nope, the usual stank of urine -- something that I automatically associate with trekking though tunnels to take pictures of graffiti -- is noticeably absent there. So, too -- not surprisingly -- it seems are any signs of any graffiti. Although on one wall of the long tunnel I noticed the faintest trace of a big graffiti piece that looked like it had been painted over years ago. Maybe, I thought, the no pee stank was because of the two Port-O-Pottys conveniently placed near the tunnel entrance.

But whatever the reason, there was also no graffiti here, or so I was thinking until I spotted off to the right near the end of the long tunnel (one of several blasted by dynamite back during World War II when the battery was built) an opening that appeared to lead off to another smaller tunnel. I slowly stepped into this unknown darkened space which, it turned out, was not another tunnel but a low-ceilinged, cement-walled room. And it was pitch dark. Not having a flashlight, I slowly edged my way into the dark, windowless room. And once inside, my nostrils were awakened to that familiar stench. Piss. And sure enough -- graffiti wasn't far off.

As my eyes slowly got a bit accustomed to the lighting I could make out some graffiti on the walls  that surrounded me and on the entrance to this claustrophobic, enclosed, window-less space. I couldn't make out much with the naked eye but the flash on my camera lit up all the graffiti nicely as it took pictures -- see all, displayed below. Also included in the pics below is an adjacent room plus a couple of low-key pieces of graf outside the tunnels like the R.I.P. on the (tombstone like) rock out in the forest area.

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