Amoeblog

WHEN RAP GETS EVEN SCARIER: YOUNG CONSERVATIVES WITH MICS

Posted by Billyjam, June 14, 2009 02:51pm | Post a Comment

The above video, which, note, is serious, not ironic, has been making the rounds since it first surfaced on YouTube a couple of weeks ago and after the pair of young conservative "rappers," Serious C and Stiltz (aka The Young Cons), recently got airtime on -- big surprise -- FOX News. On the network, they expounded upon their political rap, which includes lyrics such as "Terrorists were imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay, now they’re in our neighborhoods, planning out doomsday" (for more of their distorted logic, see full song lyics below). 

The pair appeal to the legions of disgruntled, Obama-hating, anti-abortion, anti-socialist, right wing conservatives (many not rap fans but who are drawn in by the Cons' politics). There appear to be many of these types of people, judging by the majority of the almost 6000 YouTube comments the pair has received to date.

Admittedly, I do not agree with their political views, but that's not why I dislike the Young Cons. It's because their mic skills totally suck. Please peep the video above and/or read the lyrics below and post your opinion in the "comments" box below. And for more background info on the duo, visit the Young Cons' MySpace.

"Young Con Anthem" lyrics:

Yo this one's for all the young conservatives.
I rep the Northeast and I’m still a young con,
Let your voice release, you don’t have to be Obamatrons.
I debate any poser who don’t shoot straight,
Government spending needs to deflate,
Your ideas are lightweight,
Ya careers in checkmate
I frustrate. I increase the pulse rate
I hate when,
government dictatin, makin statements, bout how to be a merchant,
How to run a restaurant, how to lay the pavement
Bailout a business, but can’t protect an infant
Deficiencies are blatant, young con treatment
I stand one man, outnumbered at my college
Thank you Miss Cali for reminding us of marriage
Can’t support abortion, and call yourself a Christian
I support life, you’re a puzzled politician
Terrorists were imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay,
Now they’re in our neighborhoods, planning out doomsday
No such thing as utopia,
no government can control ya, baby ya,
Reap the benefits hard work, self reliant
Listen to Stiltz, my dude’s a lyrical giant

CHRIS KNOX (TALL DWARFS, TOY LOVE, THE ENEMY) SUFFERS STROKE

Posted by Billyjam, June 13, 2009 09:27am | Post a Comment
Chris Knox "Not Given Lightly" (1990)

Chris Knox, the pioneering New Zealand musician of influential Kiwi bands The Enemy, Toy Love, and the Tall Dwarfs, is reportedly in an Auckland hospital today after suffering a stroke two days ago. The talented New Zealander, who also co-founded the country's legendary indie Flying Nun record label in the early 80's, is a major figure in the development of the kiwipop story.
Chris Knox
A living legend in his native New Zealand, the 56 year-old Knox's rich & respected career dates back to late 70s NZ punk era bands The Enemy and Toy Love, followed by being one-half (along with The Enemy guitarist Alec Bathgate) of the quirky oddball 4-track pioneering duo the Tall Dwarfs, whose music I highly recommend you seek out at Amoeba if you don't already have it in your collection. (For a prime example of their sound, check the video down below of the brilliant Tall Dwarfs song "The Brain That Wouldn't Die.")

Knox, who has an uncanny knack for creating the perfect infectious pop song, has also released a number of solo, self-produced albums. His 1990 song "Not Given Lightly" (a love song to his wife -- see video above) was named "New Zealand's ninth best song of all time" at the 2001 New Zealand Music Awards.

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AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 06:12:09

Posted by Billyjam, June 12, 2009 08:32am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music San Francisco Hip-Hop Top Five: 06:05:09
AZ legendary
1) J Dilla Jay Stay Paid (Nature Sounds)

2) Eminem Relapse (Shady/Aftemath/Interscope)

3) Marco Polo & Torae Double Barrel (Duck Down)

4) Method Man & Redman Blackout! 2 (Def Jam)

5) AZ Legendary (Real Talk)

This week's top five hip-hop chart from Amoeba Music Hollywood, courtesy of Ray at the Sunset Ave. store, has many of the same brand new hip-hop releases that were also charting high at Amoeba Music San Francisco last week, including Eminem, Marco Polo & Torae, Method Man & Redman, and J Dilla.

For the second week in a row the great new album from the late, great Detroit hip-hop producer, also known as Jay Dee, Jay Stay Paid on Nature Sounds is number one at Amoeba. And deservedly so, since this new release, which is overseen production wise by Pete Rock, unveils new beats by the late artist plus matches his music with a variety of other artists including his ownJ Dilla younger brother Illa J.

The other new chart entry is the album Legendary from legendary emcee AZ, who's been putting it down since the early nineties and who first came to fame in 1994 when he made a cameo on "Life's A Bitch" on the Nas album Illmatic (he was the only guest to grace that landmark hip-hop album). He released his debut, Do Or Die (EMI), in 1995.

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BOOGIE DOWN PRODUCTIONS WAS INFLUENTIAL FOR MANY REASONS

Posted by Billyjam, June 11, 2009 10:52pm | Post a Comment
Boogie Down Productions
Bronx, New York hip-hop group Boogie Down Productions (aka BDP), who formed in 1986, earned their legendary status for numerous reasons, including the distinct musical style that they forged. They were pioneers not only for incorporating dancehall reggae into their music but also for being instrumental in paving the way for two very different strains of hip-hop-- both hardcore gangsta rap and conscious hip-hop.

Additionally, the group gave the world longtime hip-hop ambassador KRS-One (Knowledge Reigns Supreme Over Nearly Everyone). BDP at first was essentially the duo of KRS and the late DJ Scott La Rock. The group had numerous members throughout its existance and regular collaborators including D-Nice, KRS' brother Kenny Parker, his one time wife Ms Melodie, Harmony, Mad Lion, Channel Live, Run, McBoo, Scottie Morris, Tony Rahsan, RoboCop, and DJ Red Alert, to name but some. Still, it was KRS-One who was always the central character of Boogie Down Productions.

Hence, when BDP disbanded in 1992 and KRS-One continued on as a solo act, it was really more of a continuum than a total demise of BDP. However, despite the key role KRS always played, he never let the light be taken off his slain partner, original member DJ Scott La Rock, with whom he formed the group after the two met under unusual circumstances. DJ Scott La Rock, whose real name was Scott Sterling, was a social worker who met a then 19 year old KRS-One while working at the Bronx shelter for men, the Franklin Avenue Armory Shelter. KRS-One was then homeless.

Perhaps it would later be the well meaning social worker in Scott La Rock that ultimately led to his death. One day in 1987 he tried to diffuse a dispute between fellow BDP member D-Nice and some local gang bangers but the well-meaning peaceful intervention resulted in him getting shot and killed. His untimely death came only a short time after BDP's debut album Criminal Minded was released. But Scott La Rock would forever be kept alive through the music of BDP and would be consistently remembered by KRS-One in his lyrics in songs such as "My Philosophy." He is also mentioned and shouted out on countless other songs too, and "Overseen by Scott La Rock" can be seen printed on the back of several BDP releases. "My Philosophy" along with BDP videos for "Why Is That?," "The Bridge Is Over," and "Duck Down" are all featured below as a reminder of just how amazing a group BDP was.


Boogie Down Productions "The Bridge Is Over" (1987)

45RPM SINGLE TURNS 60 AND ENJOYS NEW LEASE ON LIFE

Posted by Billyjam, June 10, 2009 04:26pm | Post a Comment

This year marks the 60 year anniversary of the seven inch single, the 45rpm record that was originally introduced by RCA Records back in 1949 with the release of Eddy Arnold's double sided mono record, "Texarkana Baby" b/w "Bouquet of Roses."

The then new format, at first treated by many with a degree of suspicion, was embraced by RCA as a more compact and more durable replacement for the heavy 78rpm shellac-based records -- the ones known as wax records that would break into many pieces if dropped on the ground.

After witnessing the success of this new format for RCA, Columbia Records followed suit two years later in 1951 and from there demand just snowballed into the sixties and seventies and eighties by which time the format began to lose momentum. There have been several interesting articles written about the 45rpm's 60th birthday, including a wonderful piece written by Robert Benson published on the website JustPressPlay this week which traced the format's history and also noted how, "British trade journals have been reporting that single song 45rpm records are now outselling their CD counterparts and how many American bands are now releasing music via this historic audio medium."

A visit to Amoeba Music in Berkeley, San Francisco, or Hollywood, where there are boxes and boxes and wall displays of 45's (new and old), will also quickly confirm that the once seen as deceased 45rpm is very much alive and well. As you know, vinyl in general (45rpm's, 10" records, 12" singles, and vinyl albums) has been going through a renaissance in recent years.

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