Amoeblog

WHEN RAPPERS UNITED IN SONG: CLASSIC POSSE CUTS: 1988 - 1994

Posted by Billyjam, March 23, 2009 07:05pm | Post a Comment

"Posse cuts": the phenomenon whereby large collectives of rappers linked by crew, region, or, most often, by a common cause, all would get together to record a massive joint effort. Posse cuts were most popular circa '88 to '94-- coincidentally the same years as hip-hop's much lauded golden age.

These multiple emcee, pass-the-mic styled hip-hop songs date back to hip-hop's formative years (many of them freestyle sessions in the 1970's Boogie Down that were not even recorded and some that were, such as Afrika Bambaataa & the Soul Sonic Force's "Zulu Nation Throwdown" in 1980). It wasn't until the later 1980's that the posse cut came into its own. Below are the videos of seven of some of the best posse cuts from this six-year span -- all timeless, classic hip-hop recordings that I personally never tire of.

1988's Marley Marl-produced "The Symphony" by The Juice Crew not only put the posse cut format firmly on the rap map but it also remains one of the best singles in hip-hop history, period. On it, each contributor of the Queensbridge extended hip-hop family flows like water: Masta Ace, Craig G, Kool G Rap, and Big Daddy Kane -- all over a dope Marley Marl (known as "Dusty Marl" in the video below) track that samples Otis Redding. Note that this video is not the full album version as found on the 1988 Cold Chillin Marley Marl album In Control Volume 1.

The 1989 posse cut "Self Destruction" by the star studded Stop The Violence Movement was an even grander and more ambitious project in terms of the number of talented emcees that would bless the mic for this heartfelt anti-violence anthem that came about following a fatal fight that broke out during a Public Enemy/Boogie Down Productions concert. The tragedy inspired KRS-One to form the Stop the Violence Movement. After doing so, he co-produced a track with fellow BDP member D-Nice, enlisted some of the East Coast's best and recorded the single "Self Destruction" on Jive with all proceeds going to the National Urban League. The stellar lineup included KRS-One, Ms Melodie, D Nice, Chuck D, Flavor Flav, Kool Moe Dee, MC Lyte, Stetsasonic's Daddy O, Delite, Fruitkwan, Wise, Doug E Fresh, Just Ice, and Heavy D.

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R.I.P. NEW ORLEANS PIANO GREAT EDDIE BO

Posted by Billyjam, March 21, 2009 02:19pm | Post a Comment
eddie bo
Legendary New Orleans pianist, singer, songwriter and producer Eddie Bo (born Edwin Joseph Bocage) died of a heart attack on Wednesday. He was 79 years of age. One of the last great New Orleans piano professors, he was described by New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival producer Quint Davis as a "kind of a bridge between Professor Longhair and Allen Toussaint."

Known for an eclectic style that drew from jazz, funk, RnB, and rock 'n roll, Eddie Bo's 1962 hit "Check Mr. Popeye" inspired a dance craze at the time. Other notable hits by the incredibly prolific artist, who over the years released singles on a number of different record labels such as Ace, Ric, Apollo, Chess, and Bo Sound (his own imprint) included "Check Your Bucket" and "Hook and Sling," which was a Billboard Top 20 RnB hit in 1969.

The artist grew up in Algiers and the 9th Ward of New Orleans and graduated from Booker T. Washington eddie boHigh School followed by a stint in the US Army. Upon his return to New Orleans, he studied arranging and composing at the Grunewald School of Music, and soon after began his music career.

In addition to his own catalog and appearing (in recent decades) on albums with the Dirty Dozen Brass Band and George Porter Jr., Eddie Bo's music has been covered by many others, most notably Etta James, who had a hit in 1959 doing a cover of his song "Dearest Darling," and Little Richard, who adapted Bo's song "I'm Wise" to make it the song "Slippin' and Slidin." 

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Amoeba Music Weekly Hip-Hop Round Up 03:20:09 Eligh and Jo Wilkinson, T.I., E40, Roots Picnic, SxSW shows, Chess Federation vs Obama?, etc...

Posted by Billyjam, March 20, 2009 08:10am | Post a Comment
AMOEBA MUSIC HOLLYWOOD HIP-HOP TOP FIVE: 03:20:09
eligh and jo wilkinson
1) Eligh and Jo Wilkinson On Sacred Ground: Mother And Son (Legendary Music)

2) Scarab + Very present The Classic EP (Legendary Music)

3) Brother Ali The Truth Is Here (Rhymesayers Entertainment)

4) N.A.S.A. The Spirit Of Apollo (Anti)

5) T.I. Paper Trail (Atlantic)

Special thanks to Marques at the Hollywood Amoeba Music store for this week's Hip-Hop Top Five chart of the store's best selling new hip-hop albums. In the number one, with a bullet, slot is the new Legendary Music release from Eligh and Jo Wilkinson, On Sacred Ground: Mother And Son, whose impressive guest list includes Mark Bell, The Grouch, Pigeon John, Jiro Yamaguchi, Paul Dateh, Robert Miranda, Shanti Foster, and Slug of Atmosphere. Album highlights include "By And By" (feat. The Grouch & Paul Dateh), and "Honor Me" (feat. Pigeon John). Number two on the chart is a related release featuring Scarab (also of Living Legends fame) and Very of Us Pros, the duo known as Afro Classics, with the Classic EP. The EP includes scarab & very present the classic epsongs such as "Boom It," "The Follow Through," and "Live From Los Angeles Pt 1."

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JANIS JOPLIN DIED WAY TOO YOUNG

Posted by Billyjam, March 18, 2009 05:07pm | Post a Comment
  
Janis Joplin & friends partying on the Festival Express train
There is a tragically telling scene near the end of Festival Express, the 2003 rockumentary about the 1970 rock festival tour by train across Canada. In it, Janis Joplin is on stage with Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead between music and before the closing set by Joplin of the final date of the exciting railway tour that also included the Flying Burrito Brothers, The Band, Buddy Guy, and Sha Na Na. As much as it was a concert event, it was equally a traveling party, with one railway car ("the bar car" - as in video clip above) specifically set up for drinking and partying -- a place where Joplin apparently spent a fair amount of time. 

In the film's final scene, Joplin, whose legendary hard partying ways would lead to her death not too long after this very concert, is seen onstage and seems a bit buzzed but still functional. She proceeds to present the two main organizers of the unique railway traveling rock tour, Ken Walker and Thor Eaton, with a heartfelt, two-part thank you gift. She first presents them with a model train "to remember" the tour, and then, smiling widely, presents them with a case of tequila "to continue" the party. In return they gave Joplin a gift of her favorite poison, a bottle of Southern Comfort, which obviously pleased the singer, who passed it off stage for safekeeping and proceeded to jump into an inspired rendition of "Tell Mama."

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THE LEP IN THE HOOD: SO BAD IT'S GOOD

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2009 06:15pm | Post a Comment

Since it is Paddy's Day I want to nominate the best/worst Irish themed movie ever made: Leprechaun In The Hood. Directed by Rob Spera, the flim stars recurring Leprechaun lead Warwick Davis as the evil Leprechaun, or "Lep" as he is known, along with a cast that includes Ice T (as the pimp Mack Daddy O'Nassas), Coolio (as himself) and as the wanna be rappers Postmaster P. Stray Bullet, and Butch, Anthony Montgomery,  Rashaan Nall and Red Grant respectively.

The loose storyline of this Doug Hall penned rap-themed action/horror/comedy is that Lep ends up in the hood of Compton, CA where he has been awakened from his deep sleep (big mistake) by Ice T and announces "Death to he who sets a Leprechaun free. Steal his gold, it will corrupt your soul, you see. For many a moon the legend has grown, death toll increases, solution unknown. Beware the evil wanderer in search of his loot, lest you suffer the wrath of his golden flute. Flee while you can, the future's not good-- for no one is safe from a Lep in the Hood!"

Made in 2000, Leprechaun In The Hood is one of those movies that it is so awfully bad that it's actually good, or at least hella entertaining to watch, or half-watch as you do other tasks, or after a few pints of Guinness. It is the fifth installment in the Leprechaun B-movie series, which also includes such far-from-classy episodes as Leprechaun 4 in Space, but this one succeeds because it is so ridiculously funny, unintentionally so at times. 

Best scenes include towards the closing when little Lep does his rap ("Lep in the hood come to no good") surrounded by zombie hotties, and the scene in which Lep gets blunted in the bathroom with Ice T and, in his ridiculously over the top thick stage-Irish accent, utters his best line in the film: "A friend with weed is a friend indeed."

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