"Ever Get The Feeling You've Been Trumped?" GOP Front Runner's Shocker That Presidential Run Was "Huge Prank For New Reality Show"

Posted by Billyjam, April 1, 2016 11:53am | Post a Comment
"I will officially be dropping out of the presidential race on Tuesday. The whole thing was a huge prank for my new reality TV show Ever Get The Feeling You've Been Trumped which will air this summer. It'll be huge, bigger than any other TV show ever," said Donald "Punk" Trump today in an Amoeblog exclusive (read full interview below). The GOP front runner admitted that his entire faux campaign from day one was merely a ruse for his producers to gather footage for this new reality show ("Most of the footage we didn't even have to shoot. The media did it for us for free! We must have 10,000 hours already from cable news alone!").

The admittance was made by Trump, who insisted "Punk" be added to his name while sporting a mohawk and citing both Ashton Kutcher's reality show punk'd and punk rocker Johnny Rotten as inspiration. Trump said his new show title is based on the Sex Pistols breakup announcement in San Francisco in January 1978 when Johnny Rotten famously, before dramatically dropping the mic, howled at the crowd. "Ah hah hah. Ever get the feeling you've been cheated? Good night!" (video below) In his Amoeblog interview Trump also claims hat he was behind that famous moment in rock and roll history. 

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Famous Bay Area Rap Battles: Too $hort vs. KMEL

Posted by Billyjam, March 31, 2016 05:57pm | Post a Comment
Along with such legendary rap battles as Saafir vs. Casual, another one of Bay Area hip-hop history's most notorious public feuds was the mid-1990's battle in which radio station KMEL foolishly went head to head with the "Godfather of Bay Area Rap" Too $hort by banning his music on their airwaves, and stating that he hadn't had a hit in years and was at his career's end. Last Saturday at Oakland's Fox Theater the veteran Bay Area rap artist celebrated 30 years in the rap game. His show featured many surprise guests plus a smoldering hot live funk band backing him, along with opening acts Zion I, The Grouch & Eligh and DJ Fresh. Always a fan of funk and funk played live, the artist born Todd Shaw's live band included Kev Choice on keyboards while his many mic guests of the evening included Freddy B, E-40, Richie Rich, Silk-E, Mistah F.A.B., Lil Eazy E, and Raphael Saadiq who joined him on such songs as “The Ghetto” with Saadiq supplying the chorus part that was done by Gerald Levert on the original 1990 Too $hort version of the Donny Hathaway inspired hit single. Note that tonight's (March 31) added second show was cancelled at the last minute. Refunds at point of purchase.

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Roots of Reality Rap & Beginnings of Conscious Hip-Hop

Posted by Billyjam, March 30, 2016 12:00pm | Post a Comment

Upon digging in crates of early eighties hip-hop today, I was pleasantly reminded of just how socially aware and outspoken so many of those early era hip-hop records actually were. It wasn't all "party over here, party over there, say hey" structured escapist rap, at least not from this period of the early 80's onwards. Of these 12" records, I picked out three to pop on the platter and listen closely to and present here via their YouTube clips: Divine Sounds' "What People Do For Money," Kurtis Blow's "8 Million Stories," and Grandmaster Flash, Melle Mel & Furious Five's 1982 Sugar Hill single "Message II (Survival)." As the title of the latter implies, the record was the sequel to the pioneering hip-hop crew's hit "The Message" from earlier that same year. [Both are found on the group's Best Of collection CD].  An international hit, it held a mirror up to the decay and neglect of the inner city told in catchy memorable rhymes on the stark reality of living in poverty in urban America. The antithesis of a rap party anthem, "The Message" was a cold slap in the face forcing all to look at the everyday struggles of living amidst poverty and violence. On the record Duke Bootee and Melle Mel traded such famous observatory rhymes, "Rats in the front room, roaches in the back. Junkies in the alley with a baseball bat. I tried to get away but I couldn't get far. Cos a man with a tow truck repossessed my car." "The Message" and its widespread success is regularly cited as the original "conscious rap" record and held responsible for kick-starting a sub-genre of hip-hop that would play a key role in the genre up to the present. However many over the years have protested this label, citing it as too limiting and restrictive a pigeon hole to fit an artist into. Most notable of late is talented hip-hop star Vince Staples who has vocally and mockingly rebelled against and dismissed the term "conscious rap" that he protests has been unfairly applied to his work.

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Weekly Rap Round Up: 2 Chainz, Open Mike Eagle, and Adisa The Bishop

Posted by Billyjam, March 27, 2016 03:24pm | Post a Comment

With this week's release of the latest Open Mike Eagle album Hella Personal Film Festival,  Mello Music Group (MMG) continue their role of curating some of today's best and most progressive hip-hop. Last year  the Tuscon, Arizona-based indie label unleashed hip-hop gems from such artists as Semi Hendrix (Ras Kass and Jack Splash), L'Orange with both Jeremiah Jae and Kool KeithApollo Brown, Oddisse, and Open Mike Eagle.  That was 2015's  A Special Episode Of Open Mike Eagle: Split Pants at Sound Check. However Mike considers his just released album, that was recorded in London, to be a continuation of where his critically acclaimed 2014 Mello Music release Dark Comedy left off. With this new album, which will be celebrated with an Amoeba Hollywood in-store on April 5th, both the record label and gifted LA based wordsmith knock it out the park. For that thanks go to Mike's always impressive clever wordplay and the rich production of the new release.

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Honoring Hip-Hop Legacy of the late great Phife Dawg of A Tribe Called Quest

Posted by Billyjam, March 23, 2016 08:37am | Post a Comment

"You on point, Phife? All the time Tip! Well then grab the microphone and let your words rip!"
- from "Check The Rhime" classic hip-hop vocal interplay between A Tribe Called Quest's
Q-Tip and the late great Phife Dawg who just died at age 45.

Midnight MaraudersHip-hop fans awoke to some truly tragic news this morning with the announcement of the death of rapper Phife Dawg of renowned hip-hop crew A Tribe Called Quest (ATCQ). According to an early morning post today to DJ Chuck Chillout‘s Twitter feed, consequently confirmed by several other noteworthy sources, the beloved golden era hip-hop artist passed away yesterday at the young age of 45. Although no exact cause of death has been announced so far, the hip-hopper born Malik Taylor reportedly had been battling Type-I diabetes for more than half of his lifetime. In an interview in the excellent 2011 Michael Rapaport directed documentary, Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest, Phife Dawg (aka Phife Diggy, aka The Five-Foot Assassin) addresses his diabetes and dependence on sugar calling it "a sickness" and likening it to "straight-up drugs. I'm just addicted to sugar."  Part of Phife's ongoing battle with the disease included receiving a kidney transplant from his wife eight years ago.

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