Amoeblog

"Black Kripple Delivers Poetry & Lyrics" by Leroy Franklin Moore Jr. (aka The Black Kripple)

Posted by Billyjam, January 5, 2016 02:15pm | Post a Comment

Hard-working krip-hop culture ambassador, activist, and author Leroy Franklin Moore Jr. (a regular subject and contributor to the Amoeblog) has just unleashed his latest project. It's the newly published The Black Kripple Delivers Poetry & Lyrics, a book of original poems and song lyrics compiled over the past two decades by the author and sometime hip-hop artist. As with the rest of his body of work, this new project addresses issues that Black disabled people deal with, something the author says still only gets minimum attention. Some of the poems in the book were previously published in 1999 in his chapbook put out by Poor Magazine’s Poor Press, as Moore told me when I recently caught up with him to ask him some questions and invite him to share some excerpts with the Amoeblog.

As for specifically what subjects are covered in the new book, he said, "In this book you will find true stories of discrimination like cases of police brutality to love songs for the Black disabled community, my family, my lady, and poem songs for Black disabled people in history like Curtis Mayfield, Ray Charles, Rev. Cecil Ivory, Johnnie Mae Dunson, Barbara Jordan, Harriet Tubman, and many more.  This book also talks back to the Black community, academic scholars, and the media on why they do what they do and at the same time tries to uplift the work of Black disabled writers, musicians, and others."

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Amoeblog Interview with Longtime Bay Area Revolutionary Hip-Hop Artist Paris

Posted by Billyjam, January 2, 2016 07:49pm | Post a Comment

Longtime Bay Area hip-hop artist Paris, who headlines Slim's tonight (1/2) on a bill with Equipto and Locksmith, has always stayed 100% true to his political beliefs and never shied away from controversy. In fact, the outspoken revolutionary rapper, who famously got dropped by Tommy Boy Records over his outspoken content back in the early '90s, has not softened up one bit. He continues to speak out against the injustices he sees around him, even three decades into his career. Ample proof of this can be found on his latest release, Pistol Politics, which he strategically released on September 11th, 2015. 9/11 is not just a date bound to attract the public's attention but one that symbolizes a topic close to the artist's heart. 

Ever since the history-changing September 11, 2001 event, Paris has utilized his music as a platform to question 9/11, calling it an inside job. The cover art for his album Sonic Jihad, released two years after 9/11, showed a plane crashing into the Pentagon. Meanwhile its tracks featured such "truth music" tracks as "What Would You Do" that addressed the artist's theories on 9/11 as well as the Illuminati's agenda.

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Passing of The Specials Drummer John Bradbury Ends A Year Filled With Many Musician Deaths

Posted by Billyjam, December 30, 2015 02:02am | Post a Comment

It's been a rough year for music with so many artists in rock, hip-hop, and jazz dying during 2015. It seemed like every week brought more sad news of some other musical great passing. This week alone began with the shocker that beloved hard rock bad-ass Lemmy Kilmister of Motorhead and Hawkwind had died at age 70.  Also on that same day news circulated that Stevie Wright, lead singer of the sixties rock n roll band The Easybeats, had died at age 68. The Easybeats, who scored the 1966 hit "Friday On My Mind," was one of the first Australian pop bands to make an international breakthrough in the 1960s. More sad news came on Tuesday morning when it was announced that drummer John "Brad" Bradbury of the legendary UK ska band The Specials had died at age 62. "It is with deep regret that we say goodbye to our great friend, the world's greatest drummer, our beloved Brad. RIP," came the Tweet from the official Special's Twitter account. So far there is no word on the cause of death of Bradbury.

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Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: 1985 LL Cool J & Cut Creator Goes To Maine To Explain Hip-Hop, Rapping and Scratching

Posted by Billyjam, December 29, 2015 02:43pm | Post a Comment

LL Cool J and his DJ Cut Creator school the young Maine audience in hip-hop (June 1985)

"I'm from New York City. I have a house in Brooklyn. I live in Queens. And I got my man Cut Creator; he lives in Manhattan," LL Cool J tells the unlikely audience at one of his early shows on June 21st, 1985. This week's Amoeblog Hip-Hop History Tuesdays rewinds back three full decades to an unlikely locale for hip-hop history -- a small college hall in Waterville, Maine. There at an all ages show the less-than-full auditorium crowd was made up of mostly young school age kids with seemingly little or no familiarity with the still young genre of hip-hop (although I bet that this show changed the musical tastes of many of those in attendance.). It was at that Maine town's Colby College that a most articulate 17-year-old LL Cool J, along with his DJ Cut Creator, brought the gospel of hip-hop to a seemingly unschooled audience. This LL did in a perfectly balanced concert meets lecture session - covering scratching and beatboxing, as well as rapping. It's important to note that at this time, it would still  be years before YO! MTV Raps would bring the Bronx-born music and culture of hip-hop directly into households across the nation.

Not only was hip-hop new to the much world at this stage in time but so too was the future superstar hip-hop artist (and actor) whose name stood for Ladies Love Cool James.  Back in the early summer of 1985 the only record by LL Cool J was his debut single "I Need A Beat."  That Def Jam rap single may have been a hit for the new rapper but, judging by the lackluster reaction of the crowd when he and his DJ performed it, most at this Maine show were unfamiliar with it and its maker.  It would be another five months before the talented teen from Queens, NY would release his huge hit debut album Radio that last month celebrated its 30 year anniversary (Radio available in LP format). But regardless of how unknown he may have been to this audience or how little most seemed to know about hip-hop, nothing deterred LL Cool J.  Young but a true professional, he meticulously broke down and explained all the components of hip-hop in a easy to follow method that was bound to make his audience curious to seek out more. And as such I think this is one of the greatest hip-hop videos from this time period.  I only recently learned of this clip when a friend of the son of concert organizer/producer Mike Starr forwarded it to me via WFMU. She did so to inform me that Starr, who went by the radio DJ name of DJ Time Bomb, had just died (Rest In peace). Reportedly the late Maine DJ/promoter had organized LL to travel to the college to perform and had paid him $500 for the show.  But because LL would be the only only rap act on the bill, the artist was concerned it would a be short performance. So Starr shrewdly suggested he use the opportunity to educate the audience in the elements of hip-hop; particularly scratching, and beatboxing in addition to rapping. This he ably did and more;  even leaving the young impressionable minds with the message of don't do drugs and stay in school! Below is the Krush Groove clip featuring LL Cool J's "I Can't Live Without My Radio" found on both the Krush Groove soundtrack and on LL Cool J's  album Radio.

Top 30 Hip-Hop 2015 Hit Albums

Posted by Billyjam, December 27, 2015 07:47pm | Post a Comment

With its number one album being the critically acclaimed Kendrick Lamar modern classic To Pimp a Butterfly, this Top 30 Hip-Hop Hit Albums in 2015 list is one of three Amoeblog hip-hop year-end lists. This list's results are compiled by drawing from various sales figures of the year's top-selling albums, while also taking into consideration overall critical response. The factors included are first week sales on the Billboard Top 100 chart, overall sales at Amoeba, plus Metacritic ratings. A lot of the time, both sales figures and critical ratings are equal, but on some occasions they were not (hence why some albums might rate higher on this chart than lists based solely on sales). Still, overall the Top 30 that made the list is reflective of the most commercially well-received albums in 2015. With a few exceptions and regardless of the order, this top 30 includes most of the top 30 best-selling albums of the year. Exceptions would include Dom Kennedy's By Dom Kennedy and Drake & Future What a Time to Be Alive because both 2015 albums were digital only and unavailable through Amoeba. The list is also reflective of a lot of the artists whose album tracks received major radio airplay in 2015.

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