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Download Classical Music's Greatest Hits

Posted by Rubin Meisel, March 6, 2014 04:43pm | Post a Comment

Explore Classical MusicOn the surface, Classical music and downloading is a bit of a mismatch. The chance of someone downloading Wagner’s four and a half hour opera, Parsifal, or Bach’s three hour choral masterpiece, St. Matthew Passion, to play on their iPad is rather remote. But there is a seemingly brisk business in downloading popular classical "Greatest Hits." The nomenclature of the potential buyer is different than that of a seasoned Classical aficionado (song versus composition piece for instance). Another challenge is the novice buyer may know what the piece (song) sounds like, but does not know the name of the composer. The novice buyer will probably know the piece from a movie, a commercial, video game or even a cartoon. Downloads generally give you the flexibility of sampling and then downloading the track you want or the entire piece. Explore our full catalog of Classical music downloads, which are 20% off in March with promo code DLSALE.

Here is a short list of some of the most popular Classical pieces being downloaded and some of the more accessible endeavors with which they are associated:

Bach Cello Suites

Top 5 Classical Albums of 2012

Posted by Rubin Meisel, December 12, 2012 04:31pm | Post a Comment

1. Cecelia Bartoli - Mission

Cecilia BartoliBartoli's latest album, as is her custom, explores uncharted areas with the music of the little-known but brilliant Italian Baroque composer and diplomat Agostino Steffani. The deluxe album has extensive notes reviewing Steffani's amazing career.

 

 

 

 

2. Esa-Pekka Salonen - Out of Nowhere: Violin Concerto

esa-pekka salonenThe former conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic is also a brilliant composer and recently composed an adventurous violin concerto for the celebrated violinist Leila Josefowicz. The music incorporates pop elements but is in no way a crossover piece and is a deeply personal statement by Salonen.

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Huge Vinyl Collection to Hit Amoeba Hollywood on 7/21. Eastern European Classical Gems Galore!

Posted by Rubin Meisel, June 28, 2012 12:40pm | Post a Comment

We were lucky enough to buy a huge collection of vinyl from a well-known collector who lived in Kew Gardens in the New York Borough of Queens and collected a bit of every thing. My task is to describe what, in my 39 years of experience, is the most eclectic collection of classical music I have ever seen.

Normally, when one sees a large collection of classical, you see Beethoven, Mozart, Bach, and so forth, performed by world renowned artists. But Ed (withholding his last name) collected mainly 20th-century composers from every European country and a lot of American music that has been unjustly forgotten.

I think I know my composers, but there were a number of them in this collection that I have never heard of and whose existence is scantly documented in reference books that are in the English language.

One of the few sanguine effects of Eastern European communism was that each country had it’s own state-run record label that methodically recorded the music of every prominent living composer.

MelodiyaHere are a few examples:

 

COUNTRY LABEL
 Soviet Union  Melodiya
Romania  Electrocord
Bulgaria Balkaton
Hungary Hungaroton
Czechoslovakia Supraphon
East Germany Nova


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Amoeba Hollywood Classical Event: 12/3

Posted by Rubin Meisel, November 22, 2011 04:26pm | Post a Comment
Amoeba has purchased a large Classical collection from a well-known collector. This unique collection has many thousands of rare Classical CDs and LPs along with many collectable soundtracks. This is without doubt the finest collection of Classical Music that Amoeba Hollywood has ever acquired. Collection will be highlighted in our classical music department through 12/31!
  • Thousands of titles 
  • Rare Classical labels, including Hyperion, Chandos, Lyrita, Naxos, Marco Polo, Dutton and many others.
  • Enormous range of composers particularly those that are hard to find. Special emphasis on Romantic and 20th century mainstream composers along with an array of film composers.
  • Collection is in pristine mint to near mint condition
  • Significant amount of CDs are currently not in print
  • Many rare soundtracks from private labels
  • Competitively priced

Any questions regarding the collection should be sent to classical@amoeba-music.com.

Here is a sampling of the items available for sale in this Classical collection. See more titles available from this collection in our Classical Buy Stuff section on Amoeba.com.

Stokowski Stokowski/Houston Symphony
Gliere: Symphony No. 3/Loeffler: A Pagan Poem (CD)
EMI Classics

Early Days of the Classical LP

Posted by Rubin Meisel, October 11, 2011 04:05pm | Post a Comment
Remington label lp Columbia album label lp Mercury label album lp Hearing Is Believing lp album vinyl Haydn vinyl album
On June 21st, 1948, CBS engineer Dr. Peter Goldmark introduced the new Columbia long playingDr. Peter Goldmark CBS LP Columbia long playing record record at a press conference. In the previous 15 years, there had been attempts to make a commercially viable long play album with no success. As with the concurrent development of television, the post-war boom made the project commercially viable. 33 1/3 rpm was considered the optimum speed to play the 12 inch long play microgrove records. And being made of a new plastic called vinylite they were virtually unbreakable. For shorter pieces and recitals, there were 10 inch records, but these only survived till the 1950s.
 
The new LP was considered a huge leap forward for listening to pre-recorded Classical music. A pop song took, on average, two or three minutes to play, which was just perfect for a 10 or 12 inch 78 rpm record. A symphony required up to 5 or 6 records on 78 rpm and had to be changed 10 to 12 times with the music often interrupted in the middle of a musical phrase. There were automatic 78 rpm record changers, but they were clunky and could damage your records. You also had to account for the amount of storage space needed for the brittle, breakable shellac 78s. The most dramatic part of Goldmark’s demonstration was when he was photographed holding a few dozen LPs while the equivalent in 78s were stacked six feet high next to him.
 
The introduction of the LP was not without controversy. Columbia’s great rival RCA Victor was developing its own system of 7” short playing vinyl records that played at 45 rpm. RCA engineers insisted that quality control problems with LPs would doom it. This started what was to be known as “The War of the Speeds” in which both companies spent a ton of money on print ads to woo the public before RCA conceded and converted to LP. When it was settled, it set up the paradigm that lasted for nearly 40 years: LP for albums, 45s for pop singles.

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