Amoeblog

Music History Monday: September 23

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 23, 2013 12:35pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: September 23, 1926 - Jazz music icon John Coltrane (born John William Coltrane in Hamlet, NC). Happy Birthday to this jazz giant on what would have been his 87th Birthday.
 


Born on this day: September 23, 1930 - "The Genius" Ray Charles (born Ray Charles Robinson in Albany, GA). Happy Birthday to this musical icon on what would have been his 83rd Birthday.
 


Born on this day: September 23, 1949 - Rock music icon Bruce Springsteen (born Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen in Long Branch, NJ). Happy 64th Birthday to the Boss!
 


On this day in music history: September 23, 1967 - “The Letter” by The Box Tops hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks. Written by Wayne Carson Thompson, it is the debut single and biggest hit for the Memphis quintet fronted by lead singer Alex Chilton. Songwriter Thompson ("Always On My Mind") will be inspired to write "The Letter" when his father comes up with the lyric "give me a ticket for an aeroplane." Thompson will quickly write the rest of the lyrics and melody around that line. Once the song is complete, Thompson will take it to his friend, producer Chips Moman who also owns American Recording Studios in Memphis. Moman in turn will tell his songwriting partner Dan Penn about the song. Penn is working with a young rock band featuring a sixteen-year-old lead vocalist Alex Chilton. Penn will hear the song and decide that it is perfect for his young charges first release. Recorded in the spring of 1967, the band (with songwriter Thompson also playing guitar on the session) will cut the track in about eight hours, recording 30 takes to come up with the final master. For the final touch, Penn will overdub the sound of a airplane flying over toward the end of the song. When Moman objects to the addition, Penn will threaten to cut up the tape with a razor blade rather than remove the sound effect. Moman will allow it to remain on the finished record. At the time the band records the single, they do not have a name. One of the members will jokingly suggest that people “send in 50 cents and a box top” with their possible group name. From that, the band will be dubbed "The Box Tops." Released in July of 1967 on Bell Records' Mala imprint, “The Letter” will enter the Hot 100 at #85 on August 12, 1967, leaping to the top of the chart six weeks later. The song will be covered by a number of artists including The Arbors, The Ventures, and Don Fardon. Joe Cocker will have the second most successful recording of the song when his version hits #7 on the Hot 100 in June of 1970. The Box Tops' version of "The Letter" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

Continue reading...

Music History Monday: September 16

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 16, 2013 11:55am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 16, 1963 - "She Loves You" by The Beatles is released in the US. Written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, it is the band's third single to be released in the US. Lennon and McCartney will begin writing the song while The Beatles are touring the UK with fellow Liverpudlians Gerry & The Pacemakers and American star Roy Orbison in June of 1963. They will finish writing it over the next couple of days before recording it at Abbey Road Studios on July 1, 1963. The single's B-side, "I'll Get You," will also be recorded during the same session. The single is released by Philadelphia-based indie label Swan Records after it is offered to both Capitol and Vee Jay Records who both turn it down. At first, the single will receive only minimal exposure and fails to make the Billboard Hot 100. After the band breaks through with "I Want To Hold Your Hand" a few months later, Swan will reissue "She Loves You" in January of 1964 and it will re-enter the chart hitting #1 on the Hot 100 on March 21, 1964, becoming their second million-selling single in the US. Swan Records will also release the bands German language version of the song titled "Sie Liebt Dich" (recorded in Paris on January 29, 1964 during the same recording session for "Can't Buy Me Love" and the German version of "I Want To Hold Your Hand," titled "Komm Gib Mir Deine Hand") on May 21, 1964, following the chart topping success of the original version. However, it will sell poorly, peaking at #97 on the Hot 100 on June 27, 1964.
 

Continue reading...

Music History Monday: September 9

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 9, 2013 11:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: September 9, 1941 - R&B vocal icon Otis Redding (born Otis Ray Redding, Jr. in Dawson, GA). Happy Birthday to The Big "O" on what would have been his 72nd Birthday.
 


On this day in music history: September 9, 1967 - "Cold Sweat Pt. 1" by James Brown hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for three weeks, also peaking at #7 on the Hot 100 on August 26th. Written by Brown and Alfred "Pee Wee" Ellis, it is the fifth R&B chart topper for the Hardest Working Man in Show Business. The song is originally written in 1962, but is re-recorded and given a dramatic re-arrangement after Brown hears "Funky Broadway," the recent hit single by Wilson Pickett. The track is recorded at King Studios in Cincinnati in May of 1967 and is the first session for engineer Ron Lenhoff who will become Brown's recording engineer for the next eight years, recording and mixing numerous hits for the Godfather of Soul. The extended workout runs over seven minutes in its entirety, but is edited and split into two parts for single release. "Cold Sweat" will mark a major turning point in the evolution of R&B music, being the first record to introduce the subgenre known as Funk. By putting more emphasis on the rhythmic aspects of the song, rather than the melody, it will be regarded as one of the most influential records ever released. Released as single in July, "Cold Sweat" will climb the R&B and pop charts quickly. Ironically, it will be replaced at the top of the R&B charts by Wilson Pickett's "Funky Broadway," the very song that inspired James Brown to create "Cold Sweat."
 

Continue reading...

Music History Monday: September 2

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 2, 2013 11:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 2, 1978 - George Harrison marries Olivia Trinidad Arias ingeorge harrison  olivia a civil ceremony at the Henley-On-Thames Register Office in South Oxfordshire, UK. It is the second marriage for the former Beatles guitarist, having been married previously to model and actress Pattie Boyd from 1966 to 1974. Harrison will meet Arias in 1974 while she is working as a secretary for his then label A&M Records. Shortly after, the two will become friends and begin dating. The couple will marry one month and a day after the birth of their only son Dhani (born on August 1, 1978). They will remain happily married for 23 years until Harrison's death in November of 2001.

On this day in music history: September 2, 1981 - "Controversy" by Prince is released. Written and produced by Prince, it is the eighth single release for the Minneapolis-born musician. Issued as the first single and title track to his fourth album, the song is a bold statement from the normally reclusive and media shy artist. Normally very private about his personal life, the song's lyrics will address the media and fans obsession with his sexuality, and religious and political beliefs. The long album version of the track will feature Prince quoting The Lord's Prayer, but instead of ending the scripture with "amen," he will complete his recitation with the song's title. That it in itself will lead some to label the song blasphemous. "Controversy" will peak at #3 on the Billboard R&B singles chart, topping the Club Play chart for six weeks (from November 14 - December 19, 1981 c/w "Let's Work"), and peaking at #70 on the Hot 100 (on November 21, 1981). "Controversy" will be re-released in the UK (as a 2 CD EP set and 7" picture disc) in 1993 to promote the compilation album The Hits/The B-Sides.

Continue reading...

Music History Monday: August 26

Posted by Jeff Harris, August 26, 2013 02:13pm | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: August 26, 1964 - "You Really Got Me" by The Kinks is released. Written by Ray Davies, it is the first major hit for the North London based rock band. Having released two previous singles that fail to make an impact, The Kinks will be pressured by their UK label Pye Records to deliver a hit record or be dropped from the label. After Davies writes "You Really Got Me," he and the band will try the song with a number of different arrangements before finding the right one. The Kinks will record the track with American producer Shel Talmy at IBC Studios in London in July 1964. The single's trademark distorted guitar sound is achieved by lead guitarist Dave Davies slicing the speaker cone of his guitar amp with a razor blade. It will also be one of the first rock songs to feature power chords (perfect 5ths and octaves) rather than major or minor triads. This will lay the template for the hard rock and heavy metal music genres that will follow in the years to come. The song will hit #1 in the UK and #7 on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 28th. One of the records that will help define the '60s "British Invasion" era, "You Really Got Me" is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999.
 


On this day in music history: August 26, 1967 - "Ode To Billie Joe" by Bobbie Gentry hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks. Written by Bobbie Gentry (birth name Roberta Lee Streeter), it will be the biggest hit for the Mississippi born singer/songwriter. The cryptic story song about a young man committing suicide for unknown reasons is an immediate smash. Recorded at the Capitol Tower in Hollywood on July 10, 1967, the track will be completed in less than an hour of studio time. Arranger Jimmie Haskell will add the song's crowning touch by overdubbing violins and cellos to the spare arrangement. The unedited version runs over seven minutes and it pared down to just over four minutes. Originally issued as the B-side to her debut single "Mississippi Delta," DJs will very quickly favor the flipside. "Ode To Billie Joe" will enter the Hot 100 at #71 on August 5, 1967 and it will rocket to the top of the chart just three weeks later. The song will also send Gentry's album (also titled Ode To Billie Joe) to #1 for five weeks (unseating The Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"), and winning her two Grammy Awards for Best New Artist and Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.
 

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  >>  NEXT