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Music History Monday: September 29

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 29, 2014 11:10am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 29, 1958 - "It's In The Game" by Tommy Edwards hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for six weeks, also topping the Rhythm & Blues chart for three weeks (non-consecutive) on the same date.  Written by Charles Dawes and Carl Sigman, it is the biggest hit for the pop vocalist from Richmond, VA. "It's All In The Game" is originally written in 1911 as an instrumental titled "Melody in A Major" by Charles Dawes who would later serve as Vice President of the United States under President Calvin Coolidge. Songwriter Carl Sigman will write lyrics for the song in 1951 when Tommy Edwards first records it. Edwards original version will peak at #18 on the Billboard Best Sellers chart in the Fall of 1951. By 1958, Edwards has been without a major hits for nearly four years and his label MGM Records is on the verge of dropping him, but he has one final session to go on his contract. Edwards will re-record "It's All In The Game" with a new arrangement and in stereo, making it one of the first stereo 45's released by MGM Records. The new version is released in early August of 1958 and is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #40 on August 25, 1958, it will race to the top of the chart five weeks later. "It's All In The Game" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 


On this day in music history: September 29, 1973 - "Higher Ground" by Stevie Wonder hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for one week, also peaking at #4 on the Hot 100 on October 13, 1973. Written and produced by Stevie Wonder, it is the seventh R&B chart topper for the prolific musician and songwriter. Issued as the first single from his landmark Innervisions album, the song is on the charts while Wonder is recovering from a devastating car accident, which will leave him in a coma for four days. While still in a coma, Stevie's road manager Ira Tucker, Jr. will lean down and sing the melody to "Higher Ground" in his ear and Stevie will respond by moving fingers in time with song. Recorded at Mediasound Studios in New York City, "Higher Ground" will be a virtual "one man show" with Wonder playing all of the instruments and singing all of the vocals on the track, with co-producers Bob Margouleff and Malcolm Cecil programming the synthesizers. Red Hot Chili Peppers will score a hit with their cover version of "Higher Ground" when they record it for their 1989 album Mother's Milk, even name checking Stevie Wonder in their version.

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Music History Monday: September 22

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 22, 2014 10:16am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: September 22, 1958 - Rock legend Joan Jett (born Joan Marie Larkin in Wynnewood, PA) of The Runaways and Joan Jett & The Blackhearts. Happy 56th Birthday, Joan!
 


On this day in music history: September 22, 1969 - Sly & The Family Stone appear on the debut episode of the short lived TV series The Music Scene on the ABC television network. The band will perform a medley of their hits including "Everyday People," "Dance To The Music," "Hot Fun In The Summertime," "Don't Call Me Nigger, Whitey," and "I Want To Take You Higher." The weekly show (hosted mostly by comedian David Steinberg) will run for only 17 episodes until January 12, 1970 when it is canceled.
 



On this day in music history: September 22, 1969The Band, the second album by The Band, is released. Produced by John Simon, it is recorded at 8841 Evanview Drive in West Hollywood from early - mid 1969. Issued as the follow up to their acclaimed debut Music From Big Pink, The Band will decide on a dramatic change of scenery to work on their next release. The album is recorded in a rented home in the Hollywood Hills owned by entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr.. The home's pool cabana will be converted into a recording studio for the duration of the sessions. It will yield a number of the band's classics including "Up On Cripple Creek" and "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down." The LP cover, featuring a sepia photo of the band by photographer Elliot Landy, will become known as "The Brown Album" by fans for the brown colored border around the front and back of the album jacket. The Band will peak at number nine on the Billboard Top 200 and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: September 15

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 15, 2014 10:23am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 15, 1962 - "Sherry" by The Four Seasons hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for five weeks, also topping the R&B singles chart for one week on October 6th. Written by Bob Gaudio, it is the first chart-topping single for the Newark, New Jersey-based vocal quartet. Originally written as "Jackie Baby" in honor of then First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, the title will be changed several more times before it is recorded. Gaudio will write the song in just 15 minutes on the way to a band rehearsal. The Four Seasons were first known as The Four Lovers, recording an album and several singles for RCA Victor, and scoring their first chart record with "You're The Apple Of My Eye" (#62 Pop) on Epic Records in 1956. The group will go through numerous line up changes before 1961 when they change their name to The Four Seasons. Entering the Hot 100 at #65 on August 25, 1962, the single will quickly rocket to the top just three weeks later. "Sherry" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 


On this day in music history: September 15, 1965Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul, the third album by Otis Redding, is released. Produced by Jim Stewart, Isaac Hayes, and David Porter, it is recorded at Stax Recording Studios in Memphis from April 19 - July 10, 1965. It features covers of three songs by Redding's idol Sam Cooke, as well as originals "I've Been Loving You Too Long" (#2 R&B, #21 Pop) and "Respect" (#4 R&B, #35 Pop). The album will also become a big hit in the UK both through word of mouth and a now-legendary tour that features Redding backed by Booker T. & The MG's. In time it will be acclaimed as a landmark R&B album, and one that will help to define the "Memphis Soul" sound. In 2008, Rhino Records will release a remastered version of the album featuring both the stereo and mono mixes along with non-LP B-sides, alternate takes, and tracks from his live albums In Person At The Whisky A Go Go and Live In Europe. Otis Blue will spend one week at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart on October 30, 1965, peaking at number 75 on the Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: September 8

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 8, 2014 10:34am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: September 8, 1970Third Album by The Jackson 5 is released. Produced by The Corporation and Hal Davis, it is recorded at The Sound Factory and Motown Recording Studio in Hollywood from April - September 1970. The group's third full-length album in just nine months, it contains original songs written by Motown staff writers as well as cover versions of hits by Simon & Garfunkel ("Bridge Over Troubled Water"), Shades Of Blue ("Oh How Happy"), and The Delfonics ("Ready Or Not (Here I Come)"). It will spin off two hit singles including their biggest hit "I'll Be There" (#1 Pop for five weeks and R&B for six weeks) and "Mama's Pearl" (#2 Pop & R&B), though the album version of "Mama" will feature alternate vocals from the hit single version (issued in January of 1971). It will become the group's second biggest selling album in the US, moving an estimated 4.6 million copies. Third Album will spend ten weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number four on the Top 200.
 


On this day in music history: September 8, 1972All The Young Dudes, the fifth album by Mott The Hoople, is released. Produced by David Bowie, it is recorded at Olympic Studios and Trident Studios in London from May - July 1972. The band's fifth release marks a major turning point in their career. The struggling band will be on the verge of breaking up, when Bowie steps in and offers to produce them. Initially, he will offer them the song "Sufferagette City," which they will turn down. When he plays them "All The Young Dudes," they will enthusiastically accept it. It will spin off two singles including "One Of The Boys" (#96 Pop) and the title track (#37 Pop, #3 UK Pop), which will become an anthem. The album will be regarded as a classic of the Glam Rock movement of the early to mid '70s. "Dudes" will become the band's signature song, and is covered by numerous artists including Aerosmith, Judas Priest, and Ozzy Osbourne. Mott The Hoople's original recording will be featured in the films Clueless and Juno. Later there will be some speculation as to what record label owns the rights to the recording. Mott The Hoople had recorded for Island Records prior to signing with Columbia Records. The band may or may or may not have recorded either part or all of the album before changing labels. To this day, it is a matter that none of the band members are willing to discuss. All The Young Dudes will peak at number 89 on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: September 1

Posted by Jeff Harris, September 1, 2014 10:34am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: September 1, 1944 - R&B vocal legend Archie Bell (born Archie Lee Bell in Henderson, TX). Happy 70th Birthday, Archie!
 

 

Born on this day: September 1, 1946 - Singer, songwriter, producer, and musician Barry Gibb (born Barry Alan Crompton Gibb in Douglas, Isle Of Man, UK). Happy 68th Birthday, Barry!
 


On this day in music history: September 1, 1887 - German American inventor Emile Berliner files for a patent with the US Patent Office for the Gramophone, beating Thomas Edison to the punch. Berliner's invention will use flat discs rather than wax cylinders used by Edison's machine. One of the other major issues Edison's phonograph is consistent playback speed. While Berliner is developing the gramophone, he will enlist the help of engineer Eldridge Johnson who will design a low cost, clock-work spring-wound motor that spins the disc at a consistent speed. With a group of investors backing them, Berliner will start the Berliner Gramophone Company in 1895. By 1901, Berliner and Johnson will establish the Victor Talking Machine Company (later known as RCA Victor), marking the beginning of the modern music industry.
 

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