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Music History Monday: July 21

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 21, 2014 07:25am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 21, 1948 - Singer, songwriter, musician, and humanitarian Yusuf Islam (aka Cat Stevens, born Steven Demetre Georgiou in Marylebone, London, UK.). Happy 66th birthday, Yusuf/Cat!
 


On this day in music history: July 21, 1972The Slider, the seventh album by T. Rex is released. Produced by Tony Visconti, it is recorded at Rosenberg Studios in Copenhagen, Denmark; Château d'Hérouville in Paris, France; and Elektra Studios in Los Angeles from March - April 1972. Issued as the follow up to band's glam classic Electric Warrior, Marc Bolan and the band will begin recording at the Château d'Hérouville outside of Paris on the recommendation of his friend Elton John, while on tax exile from the UK. The basic tracks will be completed in only five days, before moving on to other studios in Denmark and the US to complete the overdubs and mixing. The album will spin off the hit singles "Metal Guru" and Telegram Sam." The album's iconic cover photo is taken by producer Tony Visconti (though on the original album cover it is erroneously credited to Ringo Starr who at the time is directing a concert film featuring Bolan and T. Rex titled "Born To Boogie"). The Slider will peak at number four on the UK album chart and number 17n on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: July 14

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 14, 2014 08:05am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: July 14, 1967 - Bee Gees 1st, the US debut album by The Bee Gees, is released. Produced by Robert Stigwood and Ossie Byrne, it is recorded at IBC Studios in London from March 7 - April 14, 1967. Following their breakthrough success with their 12th single release "Spicks And Specks" (#3 AUS Pop) in Australia in late 1966, The brothers' father Hugh will send demo tapes of their work to Beatles manager Brian Epstein. Epstein will pass the tapes on to Robert Stigwood (Cream), who will invite the band to come to England in February of 1967 to audition for him. Impressed by what he hears, Stigwood will become the band's manager, with The Bee Gees moving to the UK. He will secure them recording contracts with Polydor Records in the UK and Atlantic Records subsidiary Atco in the US. The album is actually the third full-length release by the band, but is their first to be released internationally. It will spin off three singles including "New York Mining Disaster 1941" (#14 Pop) and "To Love Somebody" (#17 Pop), the latter of which is originally intended for Otis Redding. The album's cover is designed by artist/musician Klaus VoormanBee Gees 1st will peak at number seven on the Billboard Top 200.
 

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Music History Monday: July 7

Posted by Jeff Harris, July 7, 2014 09:16am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: July 7, 1940 - Legendary Beatles drummer Ringo Starr (born Richard Starkey in Liverpool, UK). Happy 74th Birthday, Ringo!
 


On this day in music history: July 7, 1962 - "The Stripper" by David Rose And His Orchestra hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week. Written by David Rose, it is the biggest hit for the British-born bandleader and composer. In 1958, Rose will write music for a television series called Burlesque (starring Dan Dailey and Joan Blondell). Recorded during the last ten minutes of a recording session, the song will go unreleased as the rest of the tracks recorded are more string oriented and the brassy instrumental seems out of place. Four years later, Rose will record a version of the pop standard "Ebb Tide" to promote the Paul Newman film Sweet Bird Of Youth. Without any time to record a B-side, "The Stripper" is pulled out of the vault and issued as the single's flipside. A DJ in Los Angeles named Robert Q. Lewis will discover the obscure track and will play it over and over for 45 minutes on his show. The stunt will make the record a hit locally in L.A., eventually spreading to the rest of the country. Entering the Hot 100 at #90 on May 12, 1962, it will climb to the top of the chart eight weeks later. Rose will go on to write the music for the long-running TV series Little House On The Prairie and Highway To Heaven. "The Stripper" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: June 30

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 30, 2014 07:11am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: June 30, 1973Fresh, the sixth album by Sly & The Family Stone is released. Produced by Sly Stone, it is recorded at The Record Plant in Los Angeles and Sausalito circa 1972 - Spring 1973. After the release of There's A Riot Goin' On in late 1971, Sly & The Family Stone will see their first personnel changes with the departure of bassist Larry Graham and drummer Gregg Errico, both having left under acrimonious circumstances. Sessions for the band's next album will begin in early 1972. The new album will introduce new band members bassist Rusty Allen and drummer Andy Newmark to the fold, though many of the tracks feature Sly playing all of the instruments himself. During the nearly 18 months that he works on the album, Sly will constantly remix and re-record several of the songs, resulting in different versions of the material. The album will spin off two hits, including the band's last million-selling single "If You Want Me To Stay" (#3 R&B, #12 Pop). When the album is first released on CD in the early '90s, alternate masters using the wrong mixes will initially be released until it is withdrawn and replaced with the correct version. This version of the album will become a sought after collector's item among Sly fans. The album's cover photo is taken by famed photographer Richard Avedon (The Beatles). Fresh will spend three weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number seven on the Top 200, and is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: June 23

Posted by Jeff Harris, June 23, 2014 07:30am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: June 23, 1965 - "The Tracks Of My Tears" by The Miracles is released. Written by Smokey Robinson, Warren "Pete" Moore, and Marvin Tarplin, it is the 21st single released by the Detroit vocal group led by singer, songwriter, and producer Robinson. The song will be developed around the song's distinctive opening guitar line created by guitarist Tarplin, taking inspiration from the Harry Belafonte calypso number "The Banana Boat Song." The track is recorded at Motown Studio A on January 20, 1965 with members of The Funk Brothers providing musical support. "The Tracks Of My Tears" will be later included on the group's album "Going To A Go Go" (#1 R&B, #8 Pop) in November of 1965. It will go on to be one of the most covered and recognized songs in the Motown catalog. Over the years it has also been featured in numerous films including Platoon and The Big Chill. The single will peak at #2 on the Billboard R&B singles chart and #16 on the Hot 100. "The Tracks Of My Tears" is also inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2007.
 

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