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'Devil's Playground' Exhibit and Sale Shine a Light on Cult Movie Posters May 15 at Lethal Amounts

Posted by Amoebite, May 5, 2015 05:30pm | Post a Comment

lethal amounts

Hundreds of original movie posters for cult films from the 1960s through the 1980s will line the walls of the Lethal Amounts gallery May 15 for “The Devil’s Playground: Salacious Macabre Vintage Movie Poster Wall Candy,” presented by Amoeba.

“Devil’s Playground” seeks to celebrate the eye-catching poster work that characterized the golden age of pornography, exploitation, horror, Gialllo and cult classic films. These rare, original posters come from a private collection and will all be for sale at the event. The show will feature posters from such films as Suspiria, Female Trouble, Zombie, Evil Dead and Debbie Does Dallas.

In addition to these killer posters, the opening reception will host special guests Mink Stole (of John Waters movie fame) and adult film cult legends Long Jeanne Silver and Serena.

The show begins at 8 p.m. Lethal Amounts is located at 1226 West 7th Street in Downtown Los Angeles.

 

The Milk Carton Kids Come to L.A.'s GRAMMY Museum May 18

Posted by Amoebite, May 5, 2015 04:49pm | Post a Comment

the milk carton kids

Amoeba is proud to sponsor The Drop: Milk Carton Kids, presented by The GRAMMY Museum, on May 18 at 8 p.m. Tickets are currently sold out.

the milk carton kids monterey cdThe Milk Carton Kids will appear at the Clive Davis Theater for an intimate performance and Q&A moderated by Scott Goldman, Vice President of MusiCares and the GRAMMY Foundation. They’ll discuss the band’s new album, Monterey, which is due May 19 on ANTI-.  You can preorder the album on LP and CD now.

The genre-bending Americana duo released their debut album, The Ash & Clay, in 2013 to rapturous acclaim, garnering a GRAMMY nomination for Best Folk Album and winning Group of the Year at the 2014 Americana Music Awards. For Monterey, band members Kenneth Pattengale and Joey Ryan created the album in concert halls, churches and theaters across the country in aims of achieving the spontaneity of a live show. The band continues to incorporate jazz, classical and dark lyricism into its sound, which Paste magazine has said carries an “intellectual sophistication.”

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Can You Say, 'Amen! Hallelujah '? These Records Do.

Posted by Rick Frystak, May 5, 2015 02:01pm | Post a Comment

Used to be, you'd just turn to the person on your left or ring a few doorbells and you could share the word, the joy, an essence of spiritual inspiration so grand that it had to be shared with others. Nowadays, bomb blasts  announce a religious or causal empathy so strong that death as the message is a possible option.

Not with these folks. Herein is a collection of LPs designed to to share a joy, a goal, the exitement of an idea worth sharing. These LP days are over, mostly because of super slick production, barrages of video and television rejoicing and other delivery methods. I've grabbed these and shot them over the last few years because they make me feel good, never even playing them, just feeling the joy on the LP package. Lord knows what these sound like...

Savor these, then, and pick them up and many more like them right from the bins of Amoeba Hollywood!

John Frusciante on his Trickfinger project released on Acid Test

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 5, 2015 12:46pm | Post a Comment



John Frusciante on his Trickfinger project released on Acid Test


The latest chapter in the electronic evolution of former Red Hot Chili Peppers guitarist John Frusciante sees him utilizing the classic hardware that spawned the eternal acid template under the guise of Trickfinger. “After Below’s” marching beat and ethereal synths flow into “Before Above’s” layered, ascending attack. “Rainover” has a full-bodied 303 groove that becomes more infectious as the track progresses; “Sain’s” complex opening bassline and beats eventually give way to a similarly intoxicating bassline. “85h’s” 4/4 beat hits hard, making it the go-to banger on Trickfinger, while “4:30’s” fluttering synths make it the album’s most headphone-friendly track. “Phurip” ends the album on dancefloor-friendly lockstep three-note groove that you never really want to end. In contrast with his genre-hopping solo releases, Frusciante’s Trickfinger sticks hard to acid house, making it his most focused release yet. With Trickfinger, Frusciante has found his way to a satisfying post-RCHP solo career that speaks to his wide and ever-changing musical talents.

Read the interview at Resident Advisor here

Album Picks: Mikal Cronin, Best Coast, Hiatus Kaiyote, Metz

Posted by Billy Gil, May 5, 2015 10:11am | Post a Comment

Mikal CroninMCIII

mikal cronin mciii lpPower-pop wunderkind Mikal Cronin’s new album is a significant leap forward for the singer/songwriter. While just as hooky as its preceding albums, MCIII is more heartfelt and intricate, boasting a six-song suite that has some of the album’s best melodies. “Turn Around” starts the album out with a somber tune nestled amid a flurry of electric guitars, violins and pianos. “Made Up My Mind” blasts off with a rocketship riff, while Cronin’s voice breaks under the weight of a breakup. Flourishes like horns, strings and acoustic guitars help give the album a sense of unified orchestration, while dynamics in songs like “Say,” full of cool, bass-driven breakdowns, make each song stand out. But the suite that makes up the last half of the album is its masterstroke. It moves from the spare and aching “i) Alone” to the heavy guitars of “ii) Gold,” through its outro played on the Greek stringed tzouras and into punk and singer/songwriter territory. Each song moves into the next beautifully and makes MCIII feel like Cronin’s Abbey Road. We’ve known Cronin has chops since playing bass with Ty Segall and could entertain freely on his first two albums, but MCIII is his first that feels like his own classic. Watch the just-released "Turn Around" video below, starring comedians Kurt Braunohler and Kristen Schaal.

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May the Fourth -- A Look at Star Bars and Deep Space Discos

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 4, 2015 11:27am | Post a Comment



The original Star Wars had a huge impact on pop culture. As a child, nothing in the film had more impact on me than the cantina scene -- and judging from the changes in dance music and imitations that followed I wasn't alone. What better occasion to reflect on the film's impact than May the Fourth, also celebrated as Star Wars Day.




***

Star Wars was released on 25 May 1977. I was probably three years old when I saw it in the theater because my fourth birthday followed a couple of weeks later and there were Star Wars dolls* emerging from the middle of a birthday bundt cake. After The Empire Strikes Back, George Lucas would increasingly strain to appeal directly to children by introducing cuddly aliens and increasingly relying on cartoonish CGI but for me and many other children, Star Wars was already deeply appealing, dark and sometimes frightening as it was. 


For comparative mythologist Joseph Campbell, the cantina scene was the "threshold crossing" in the "hero's journey." For me it was a bit like viewing an ethnographic bestiary -- or a Halloween party (in the 1970s, Halloween hadn't yet been hijacked by adults and turned into streetwalker cosplay). One of the cheif appeals of Star Wars was its mystery and world building -- something which the expansion of the franchise would later explain away with banal backstories -- but on full display in the cantina. Of all the characters, 
only
Greedo was addressed by a name. The rest of the assembled wore no pageant sashes, name tags, or hash tags and aside from the viewers' understandings of evolution there were few clues as to the conditions of their home worlds. 
 
LAX Theme Building

The Star Wars cantina was what I wish Encounter in LAX's Theme Building had been, and what it will be if they get it right when it's re-opened. What the cantina wasn't was every lame, uninspired hive of pretense and conformity which bills itself (despite having a liquor license) as a "speakeasy."  It wasn't illuminated by Edison bulbs, the wines weren't listed on a chalk board, there was no unfinished wooden sign on the building's exterior describing it as an apothecary, and it was probably cash only. The bartender wasn't a lumbersexual and he didn't spend twenty minutes rubbing herbs on a mason jar in the name of "mixology."

Concert Tickets For Sale at Amoeba Hollywood in May 2015

Posted by Amoebite, May 4, 2015 11:25am | Post a Comment

Concert TicketsAmoeba Hollywood regularly sells tickets to local shows, with the added bonus of charging low service fees (if you are into saving money and who isn't really?).

All tickets can be purchased at the registers (while supplies last) for a $2 service fee. We take cash and credit cards for all ticket sales. Store credit and coupons cannot be applied to ticket sales. Limit 4 tickets per person. 

For Club Nokia shows, we only carry general admission tickets. If you wish to purchase reserved seating at Club Nokia (where available), you can buy those tickets online here.

Please note that on the day of the show, we will stop selling tickets for that show at 5pm.

Tickets are limited, so please call the store first to make sure they are available: 323-245-6400.
 

JUST ADDED SHOWS:

D'Angelo & the Vanguard at Club Nokia

D'Angelo & the Vanguard
Club Nokia
June 8

Mala Rodriguez at the El Rey

Mala Rodriguez
El Rey
May 21

Music History Monday: May 4

Posted by Jeff Harris, May 4, 2015 07:25am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: May 4, 1956 - "Be-Bop-A-Lula" by Gene Vincent And His Blue Caps is recorded. Written by Tex Davis and Gene Vincent, it is the debut release and biggest hit for the rock & roll band fronted by Vincent (born Vincent Eugene Craddock). The song is co-written by Vincent and his manager, radio DJ "Sheriff Tex" Davis, who will help the singer secure a record contract. Hollywood-based Capitol Records, in search of "the next Elvis Presley," will eagerly sign Vincent. His band The Blue Caps consists of Willie Williams (rhythm guitar), Jack Neal (upright bass), Dickie Harrell (drums), and Cliff Gallup (lead guitar). The band will record the track at famed country music producer Owen Bradley's Quonset Hut studio in Nashville, TN. Released a month later, "Be-Bop-A-Lula" will peak at #7 on the Billboard Best Sellers chart on July 28, 1956, #8 on the R&B chart, and #5 on the C&W chart, selling over two million copies. The band will also perform the song in classic rockfilm The Girl Can't Help It, released later in the year. The seminal recording will become one of the definitive examples of rockabilly music, and will go on to influence many musicians over the years including The Beatles, The Animals, and rockabilly revivalists Stray Cats. "Be-Bop-A-Lula" is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999.
 

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