Amoeblog

World No Tobacco Day

Posted by Whitmore, May 31, 2009 06:06pm | Post a Comment

It seems like every month, week and most any day is dedicated to something, and today is no exception. In 1987 the World Health Organization passed Resolution WHA40.38, "a world no-smoking day." Two years later Resolution WHA42.19 was passed and "resolves that each year 31 May shall be World No Tobacco Day." Every May 31st since has been designated as such. Observed world wide, it draws attention to the widespread prevalence of tobacco use and to its negative health effects. The day aims to reduce the 5.4 million yearly tobacco related deaths. In 2007 the tobacco theme was “Smoke-free environments.” Last year's WNTD theme was “Tobacco-Free Youth.” This year’s theme is "Tobacco Health Warnings," with an emphasis on picture warnings, shown to be particularly effective at making people aware of the health risks. More and more countries are requiring tobacco packaging to show the dangers as is called for in guidelines to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. As for tomorrow, June 1st, it is the start of the officially designated Turkey Lovers Month and here in Hollywood we’ll be celebrating with a wide concoction of turkey dishes, turkey activities and tossing around fun facts such as: wild turkeys can fly for short distances up to 55 mph and can run as fast as 20 mph.

June 2 - 8 New Bev Film Explosion

Posted by phil blankenship, May 31, 2009 03:47pm | Post a Comment
www.newbevcinema.com

June 2-8 New Beverly Film Explosion!
Amoebite Phil Blankenship takes over the New Bev for a full week of double (and triple) features of MOVIE MANIA!


Tuesday June 2

Class of 1984 plus
3:15
The Moment Of Truth


Class of 1984 screenwriter Tom Holland will appear IN PERSON to discuss the movie, schedule permitting.

Class of 1984 7:30pm

3:15 The Moment Of Truth 9:30pm


Wednesday
June 3


Witchboard plus
Witchtrap


Director Kevin Tenney will appear IN PERSON with other special guests to discuss the movie, schedule permitting.

Witchboard 7:30pm

Witchtrap 9:30pm

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Oiran So Far Away: Making sense of Mika Ninagawa's Sakuran

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, May 31, 2009 12:23pm | Post a Comment
Want candy but concerned about empty calories? I had been looking forward to seeing Mika Ninagawa's candy-colored film adaptation of the manga Sakuran for quite some time and, like a child hypnotized by sugar-filled display cases at the confectionary house, I had become quite sure of its deliciousness before I had a chance to taste the rainbow, so to speak. 


There was no doubt in my mind that this film could be anything but great. The recipe seems flawless: director Ninagawa's photographic vision delightfully compares to the eye-popping, richly colored superworld of noted fashion photographer David LaChapelle, sultry J-pop songstress Shiina Ringo lends her musical caress to the soundtrack, and actress Anna Tsuchiya, an ex-model turned J-pop strumpet who stole the show as a teenage biker girl gangbanger in Kamikaze Girls, seemed like the perfect sort of rough 'round the edges, streetwise prima ballerina to play the rebellious-yet-kept lady of the night lead character trapped in the red light of Sakuran.
anna tsuchiya in mika ninagawa's sakuran
Though we never learn her true name, the story follows a young girl sold to a house of ill-repute in the notorious Yoshiwara district of Edo, a "pleasure quarters" area of what is now known as modern day Tokyo. We watch this girl grow up learning about womanhood, sex, and the art of allure and deception, as it pertains to prostitution, from her working-girl housemates and mama-san handler. (It should be mentioned here that there is a surprising mini-montage of various angles and close-ups of breasts and nipples during a bathhouse scene that caused me to verbally chasten my television for revealing such an unexpected anatomical expose.) The girl is given the name 'Kiyoha' and, armed with what we are supposed to understand as sort of preternatural understanding of "desire," hers becomes the name on everyone's lips whether whispered passionately by admirers or spat out like venom in hatred. This leads to great fame and high, ahem, society for Kiyoha as she eventually makes the move from nobody "new girl" to celebrity oiran, a sort of esteemed courtesan who gets to parade around town in fabulously lofty footwear. Drama!
anna tsuchiya in mika ninagawa's sakuran
The infallible foundation and sturdy framework of the film is not the story, but rather the luscious scenery; the visuals satisfy cherry-pie like cravings while the tepid plot-points weaken the elastic of your undergarments like carbohydrate loading minus the burn. It doesn't help that the story is a familiar one. Many folks draw comparisons between Sakuran and Memoirs of a Geisha and, to a lesser extent, Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette. It's true Sakuran shares a similar story line to that of Memoirs, but I believe it is the better film for two reasons. First, the cinematograpic orgasmatron that Sakuran flaunts is colorfully, texturally and artfully way above and beyond anything showcased in Memoirs, including that crazy, cathartic dance scene. Second, I've always had trouble with movies that are dripping wet with a specific "other" cultural fragrances yet cast actors for convenient English speaking roles (the artistic biopic Frieda starring Salma Heyak comes to mind); Why? Is it too much to ask of an American audience to check out some subtitles? Too much trouble getting the production staff on the same page linguistically? (Sorry to digress Arsenio Hall-style, but I'll forever store this phenomenon in the things that make you go "hmmm" file.) Sakuran may be just another "geisha" picture, but it's got wicked style enough to make the 110 minutes you'll sit basking in it worth your time.anna tsuchiya rocks some tall shoes in mika ninagawa's sakuran

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No sound no tell, Gay Cinema in the silent era

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 31, 2009 12:12pm | Post a Comment
Frederic Lord Leighton Flaming June
Frederic Lord Leighton's Flaming June

June, in addition to being Vision Research Month, Fireworks Safety Months, Light the Night for Sight Months, National Candy Month, Adopt-a-Shelter-Cat Month, Cancer in the Sun Month, Dairy Month, National Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Month, National Iced Tea Month, National Pest Control Month, Safety Month, Scleroderma Awareness Month, and Zoo and Aquarium Month, is also Gay and Lesbian Pride Month, first established by Bill Clinton back in '00. Therefore, I may in the coming weeks blog about iced tea or become aware of Scleroderma, but for now I will focus on Gay Cinema.

One of the first things I noticed about gay people's feelings toward Gay Cinema is that they're almost all negative.  Exceptions are usually foreign films, which are almost invariably downers. The first year Amoeba observed Gay and Lesbian Pride month in the movie department in the form of a display, we all had an uncomfortable chuckle about the unfailingly depressing storylines of the films we featured. Films based on the lives and deaths of famous gays like Joe Orton, Brandon Teena, Oscar Wilde and James Whale all ended tragically. And here I thought gay meant happy!

closet

The history of Gay Cinema is quite unlike most minority driven alternatives to Hollywood. Unlike American Asians, blacks, Latinos and Natives -- whose identities have always been fairly obvious (except in cases of passing) -- gays have always had the option of remaining invisilble. Therefore, gays were never required to sit in the back of the bus, attend special schools or live in segregated neighborhoods. In the silent film industry, most gay actors understandably chose to hide their identitites. Though there are few overt representations of homosexuality in silent films -- mostly in European films -- most are merely hinted at. More importantly, however, the contributions of gays both in front of and behind the camera are many and noteworthy.

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Amoeba Hollywood Latin Music Best Sellers For May 2009

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 31, 2009 02:52am | Post a Comment

1. Mexican Institute Of Sound-Soy Sauce
2. Zoe-Reptilectric
3. Eydie Gorme Y Los Pachos-Cantan En Español
4. V/A-Salsa Dura Show
5. Don Omar-IDON
6. La Excelencia-Mi Tumbao Social
7. Manu Chao-Clandestino
8. Mexican Institute Of Sound-Piñata
9. Federico Aubele -Amatoria
(Five releases tied at #10)

Mexican Institute Of Sound
's latest release, Soy Sauce, takes the number one spot from April’s big seller, Zoe. Soy Sauce has received great reviews and much support on public radio, not to mention the Anglo crossover appeal. All the exposure has helped M.I.S.’s overall catalog sales. Their previous release, Piñata, took the number eight spot as well. Eydie Gorme Y Los PanchosCantan En Español is at number three, thanks in part to the fact that this album seems to be a perennial Mother’s Day gift.

May also brought to Los Angeles the 11th Annual Los Angeles Salsa Congress and with it, many Salsa fans from all over the world. I had the pleasure of helping people from Australia, Japan, Puerto Rico and some peeps from all over the U.S. Some of the Salsa enthusiasts even made last minute trips to Amoeba just before heading to the airport on their way home. Now that’s some determination, if you know L.A. traffic! Among those releases was La Excelencia’s brilliant Mi Tumbao Social and The Salsa Dura Show compilation, featuring deep Salsa jams put together by Nick Aguirre, host of one of the most popular Salsa internet radio shows in the world, Nick Aguirre's Salsa Dura Show.

A few new releases hit the charts as well. Reggaeton icon Don Omar's much-anticipated new joint, IDON, came in at number five and Federico Aubele’s third release, Amatoria, came in at number eight. Fans of Aubele’s music should know what to expect-- dubby, down tempo electronica with Spanish guitar, sultry female vocals and Tango influences. Also, along with Aubele’s new CD, there are a few new 12” remixes of previous released songs, such as "Maria Jose" from 2007’s Panamericana.

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Your Pals Are Not What They Seem 2: Faith and Reason in Lost's Season 5 Finale

Posted by Charles Reece, May 30, 2009 02:07pm | Post a Comment
Page I

john lock weird eyes lostjohn locke dead coffin lost

Being a congenital skeptic, I had expected Lost to go the way of other fantasy shows exploring the issue of faith. It began by establishing the central antagonism between its central characters, the rationalist doctor Jack Shephard (the de facto leader -- get it?) and the faith-filled, ironically named John Locke (the namesake of the famous British empiricist whose philosophical inbred progeny was one B. F. Skinner). In regaining the use of his legs after crashing on the island, Locke was granted something of his own revelation. By way of this objective correlative, Locke and the audience had a inkling that there was something more to the island than Jack's skepticism allowed. Throw in a smoke monster, people coming back from the dead and time travel and any reasonable person starts sympathizing with Nochimson's vaginal heroism. The lure is there to wrap the antagonism up in the same generic package as all the aforementioned failed fantasy programs. Affirm faith by killing it with literalism (compare the deracinated horror of Stephen King's CGI-infested movie-adpatation of his The Shining to the dread of Stanley Kubrick's).

Seems to me that faith is both an opening and a closing. The believer must remain open to mysterious possibilities that defy the normative limits given by our best explanatory models while digging his heels in the sand and claiming his irrationally derived belief is the truth. Therefore, faith requires mystery. If the implausible is made normative, as it is so often in fantasy, there is no faith involved. Of course, the recipient (viewer, reader) must maintain a level of faith by way of the classic suspension of disbelief. Similarly, lest the believer become a mere ideologue, he must live with uncertainity, a nagging suspicion that he might be wrong (i.e., not all that different from the fantasy genre's suspension requirement).

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DJ Roger Más

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 30, 2009 03:02am | Post a Comment

I met DJ Roger Más at Mas Exitos a few months back. I bought a few copies of his new single for Amoeba Hollywood based on the strength of his set that night and the fact that he is a label mate with DJ Lengua. Roger Más is a Bay area-based deejay that has a show on 90.7 KALX in Berkeley. He also spins at a few clubs, including The Make-Out Room and Skylark, both located in the Mission District, and The Missouri Lounge in Berkeley. His single is out on Club Unicornio Records.

Both sides are re-workings of somewhat obscure Cumbia and Salsa songs. “Baila Hihi” has a fat beat over a classic Descarga jam with the catchy “Baila, mulata baila” chorus. Personally, I like what he does with the Cumbia track on side B. “Cumbia Bonita” is a reworking of what I believe is the Pacho Galan Y Su Orquesta version of the song. Roger works the Cumbia percussion breakdown perfectly, which makes the track great for a segue from Hip-Hop to Cumbia or from Cumbia to something else. Deejays, I highly recommend this single.

Check out a Q & A with Roger Más right here, written a month ago for the SF Weekly. Also, check out a video made for “Baila Hihi”:

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I Heart Stones Throw

Posted by Smiles Davis, May 29, 2009 02:08pm | Post a Comment
stones throw records
What’s the best thing about living in Los Angeles? If you guessed Amoeba Records, you were close (we’re second-- actually first, according to LA Magazine). The correct answer, or I should say, the appropriate answer, is the surfeit of open-minded music aficionados that breathe and walk the streets every day. Being able to find inspiring and mood altering music readily at your disposal is the sweetest candy; being able to share it with like minded individuals who will appreciate it and celebrate it as much as you is priceless. That is why I heart Stones Throw. The air over at the Stones Throw headquarters is thick with bubbling ingenuity and relentlessness blended meticulously with an appetite for exploring outside the box. With artists like Madlib, Aloe Blacc, Damn Funk and Mayer Hawthorne leaving the swagger and overactive egos at the door, Stones Throw has singlehandedly redefined the definition of cool.

Giles Peterson dubbed Aloe Blaccs last album, Shine Through, as simply “brilliant” and I agree 110%. It's R&B, it's hip-hop, it's in two languages, and it's magic to my ears. I was fortunate enough to catch up with the bilingual, multi-instrumentalist crooner and emcee to ask him about his relationship with Stones Throw, his love for music, his upcoming album, the return of Emanon, and some of his favorite new artists.

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AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 05:29:09

Posted by Billyjam, May 29, 2009 07:37am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Berkeley Hip-Hop Top Five: 05:29:09
Eminem Relapse
1) Eminem Relapse (Shady/Aftermath/Interscope)

2) Method Man & Redman Blackout! 2 (Def Jam)

3) The Grouch & Eligh Say G&E! (Legendary Music)

4) Busta Rhymes Back On My B.S. (Flipmode/Universal Motown)

5) Tanya Morgan Brooklynati (Interdependent Media)

Eminem's latest full-length, Relapse on Shady/Aftermath/Interscope is the Detroit artist's sixth studio album and his first in five years. It is also in the number slot on the hip-hop chart at Amoeba Music Berkeley this week, just as it ranked last week at the Amoeba Hollywood store. The 20 track album from the 35 year old artist, born Marshall Bruce Mathers III, comes 13 years since his independantly released debut album Infinite, and exactly ten years since his major label breakthrough and first album through Dr Dre's Aftermath Entertainment, The Slim Shady LP.  Dr. Dre not only produced most of the new album (and its promised sequel in a few months) but Dre also cameos on the track "Crack A Bottle" with 50 Cent. As for the reaction to Relapse? It is charting high at Amoeba and elsewhere. Even here in Dublin, Ireland, where I am writing this Amoeblog, it is given high profile in and getting high sales at all the main record stores. But also here in Europe, as in the States, the album has folks divided into the two camps of either loving or hating it. Those who hate it include many former Eminem fans who contend that he has fallen off and is merely going through the motions. Those who love it do admit that it takes a few listens to fully appreciate and warn the faint of heart to be prepared for Em's often unsettling, disturbingly vivid tales of violence and abuse, including, of course, drug abuse, which is the album's theme, based on the artist's open admission to a prescription drugs addiction. 

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Lalo Guerrero "Pancho Claus" b/w "The Burrito"

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 29, 2009 02:09am | Post a Comment
I was going through some singles I had recently purchased and one of them was one by Lalo Guerrero. It wasn’t one of his most famous songs, but it's a great single nonetheless. "Pancho Claus" b/w "The Burrito" was released in 1969 on Cap Latino Records. By then, Lalo was touring and recording with his son, Mark, and his band, Mark & The Escorts. According to Mark Guerrero's website, “Pancho Claus” was a newer version of his classic Christmas song, which he originally recorded in the fifties. It’s the Chicano version of Twas The Night Before Christmas, with mother cooking Enchiladas (I wonder why Lalo didn't mention tamales? Even my Non-Mexican friends know that's when you get tamales? hmmm...), while Dad dances Mambos with the all the ladies. Rather than the kids sleeping, they are listening to The Beatles. During that part of the song, Mark & The Escorts break into “Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band.” The original 1950s version referred to Elvis, but since it was 1969, Lalo wanted to stay with the times. The next verse describes a drunken uncle that will surely end the fun and prevent Pancho Claus from visiting the household. Eventually, Pacho Claus appears, but not before the drunken uncle breaks into a version of the Mexican classic “Guadalajara.”

The flipside is even better. “El Burrito” is a song about a guy eating a burrito with a girlfriend. The chorus goes: “I’ll bite on one end, you’ll bite on the other, we’ll meet in the middle and then oh brother, we’ll kiss and kiss until we smother, and when it’s gone, we’ll order another.” It’s one of those double-meaning songs that ends with the mother catching the couple sharing the burrito. The mother takes the daughter home and Lalo is left all alone with just his burrito in his hand.

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This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, May 28, 2009 11:19pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

The full June Calendar is online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday May 29 & 30


BACK TO BACK TO BACK !

Back to the Future Trilogy Marathon
All tickets are $10 for this special event.
One ticket admits you to all three films!

Great Scott! Dr. Emmett Brown himself, Christopher Lloyd, will appear IN PERSON Friday night, schedule permitting.

Actress Claudia Wells, Jennifer in the original film, will appear IN PERSON both nights to discuss her film work.
Check out Claudia's new website www.armaniwells.com, too!

Actor Jeffrey Weissman who played George McFly in Parts II & III will be on hand Friday to talk about both movies!


Back to the Future (1985)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0088763/
dir. Robert Zemeckis, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson, Crispin Glover, Thomas F. Wilson, Claudia Wells
7:30, Watch The Trailer!

Vinyl Confidential, 2.1 -- The Brief History of 45’s, Part One

Posted by Whitmore, May 28, 2009 08:42pm | Post a Comment

The whole brief history of 45’s comes down to about two and a half minutes of heartbreak and a music industry coked up on millions of nickels and dimes from ten year olds spending their allowance. Aaah! But the joy in the weird, seemingly up the arse, off-the-cuff business decisions arbitrarily slung together.  
Why seven inches, and not six… phallic compensation? Why a big whole instead of a small one … phallic compensation! There must be some kind of underlying order and logic to all this, I guess. Then again, I'm no expert on logic and order-- I spend most of my thinking time in the absurd, geeky universe of 45's.   
 
The 7” 45 rpm record was introduced in 1949 by RCA as a smaller, more durable and marketable way to sell records to teenagers. In between crashing jalopies and begetting the next generation at lover’s lanes across the nation, all the flattop cats and the dungaree dolls were done playing Dad’s deadsville 78 rpm shellac platters at sock-hops. The Second World War brought new technology into the marketplace, the unbreakable disc was born, changing and dominating the industry for the next 40 years.
 
The first 45 rpm records were monophonic...and probably should have stayed there in its sepia toned aural perfection. But a few years later technology once again wielded new brawn, cutting a swath through the new middle class’ piggy banks and their want for shiny new electric toys. In the 1950’s and 60’s stereophonic sound looked too fancy to ignore, capturing the imagination by way of graphic designs carving up the backs of entire album covers with a geometry textbook fill of charts, dials and numbers. To starry eyes, this was the conduit to the modern world, chock-full of jetpacks, personal robots, self guided automobiles and scrumptious TV dinners. Except for the occasional monophonic promo record pressed for AM radio play, by the early 1970s almost all 45 rpm records were produced in stereo, though coincidentally, we’re still waiting on everything else promised by those rosy sci-fi prognosticators. I suspect color TV was invented specifically to take the edge off all the disappointments.  
 
Records, like bodies, like the Earth, are not necessarily made to move smoothly on curved orbits by a force called commerce. The cheapest and quickest way for record companies to track the newest new thing in a curved space was always 7” singles. Etched into each side is the shortest distance to a musicians sound, the fastest way to contemplate their muse, value, and the least painful way to navigate the unknown until the slow fade at grooves end has left your head either bopping or shaking. But sometimes the manufactured pre-determined length of a 45 was woefully insufficient. Old school set of natural law insisted three minutes was more than adequate. (Though on occasion editing could be conspicuously delicious, slicing out the unnecessary crap to get to a song’s hook: for example, the original single versions of "American Pie," "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" and "Thong Song"...) Eventually 12” 45’s, unhampered by space and time, boogied down the pike and unhinged the pulse, setting off the ballroom floor, teaching matter how to dance and in particular small objects traveling along the straightest possible lines in curved space. Anyway, the cosmos continues to evolve in its typical way; Earth continues to revolve -- though not at 45 revolutions per minute -- and my blather continues to dissolve in its typical way ...

out this week 5/26...james blackshaw...phoenix...grizzly bear...blank dogs...

Posted by Brad Schelden, May 28, 2009 01:45pm | Post a Comment
blank dogs
I imagine that everybody will be so busy talking about Grizzly Bear this week, they will forget about any other albums that have also come out this week. I am still trying to get into the Grizzly Bear, but it just hasn't been working. I don't neccessarily have a problem with them and maybe they will finally grow on me in the next couple of weeks. It just has not happened yet. But I imagine if you are already a Grizzly Bear fan then you will love this new album -- everybody seems to like it. Some lucky fans got to hear the album early and even buy it early on this Monday here at Amoeba, the day before the album officially came out.

But there are some smaller albums that are getting me very excited this week. First up is the new album by Blank Dogs. The album is called Under & Under and is released by In the Red Records. Blank Dogs is actually just one Blank Dog: one dude from Brooklyn. We seem to know way too much about most artists these days, so I find it refreshing when I know absolutely nothing about an artist. It just makes it all about the music, which is what it should be. This guy even goes so far as to wear masks when he is photographed. Blank Dogs have been putting out music for a couple of years but this is my first real introduction to him. I have long been a fan and will always be a fan of blank dogs under and undershoegaze...and shoegaze this is not, but it does sort of fall into the new genre -- "Shitgaze," brilliant term that makes complete sense. He basically is sort of making up his own weird distorted intrepretation of a genre. It makes it super personal and way more interesting than anything else out there. I am also forever in love with the keyboard, so when it is done right, I usually fall in love with the album. Blank Dogs sound not too different than the synth bands you might have grown up with. Elements of Joy Division, The Cure, and Tuxedomoon are easy to find in these songs. He is not really hiding his influences, but imagine a Jay Reatard type playing with those old genres and making his own sound. The album is dark and dreary but also has a hidden energy inside that make the songs have a sort of more fun, pop feel to them. This is probably the music I would have wanted to play if I had ever continued on my career in music and perfected my keyboard playing skills. Lots of good songs on the album, however, the first track is still my favorite. As much as I love Joy Division, sometimes I need a break. This album is the perfect alternative -- giving you the darkness you desire but with a little something else. Maybe if Ian Curtis had found the right medication and managed to survive the 80s and 90s, this is the sort of album he would have ended up making.
james blackshaw
One of my other favorites of the week is the new James Blackshaw. This guy has been around for a while but I have never actually gotten around to listening to him...although it is very possible that I did listen to him before and it just didn't hit me until now. I honestly always thought this guy was some 60 something Irish dude playing old timey folky ballads. I pictured him with a long white beard and maybe in a wheelchair -- not unlike Robert Wyatt. I was amazed to find out he was actually born in 1981, and he is from London...so I was not so far off on his location, just a bit off on my guess of his age. He has been putting out albums since 2004. He made his way to the label Young God for this new album called Glass Bead Game. Like the albums of Grouper and Jose Gonzalez, this album manages to break my heart a little every time I listen to it. At first it just seems like a simple little album of solo guitar and piano, but it managed to get inside me and break me all up inside. It was one of those albums that I put on not really exjames blackshaw glass bead gamepecting to like, but I was intrigued because it was on Young God. I just expected some Glenn Yarbrough style vocals over the music. I have not had a chance to explore his old albums, but I know he has crossed some boundaries and experimented with a couple different genres. I just like what he is doing right now. There is also some great piano work on this album. The Glass Bead Game is actually the last book by author Hermann Hesse, the man who brought us Siddhartha and Steppenwolf. The album features Joolie Wood on violin, clarinet, and flute; and also John Contreras playing the cello, both of whom also play with Current 93. Lavinia Blackwall also contributes some vocals, but most of album is instrumental. The album is nothing short of beautiful. While it manages to break my heart every time I listen to it, it also mangages to heal it every time. The album is sort of a spiritual classical album. It really makes me feel like I am living in a different era.

Continued Anticipation Surrounding Lil Wayne's Rebirth Album

Posted by Billyjam, May 28, 2009 08:00am | Post a Comment
Lil Wayne Rebirth
With its release date having been postoned more than once already (April 7th, May 19th, and June 23 were each cancelled street dates), Lil Wayne's anticipated seventh studio album Rebirth (Cash Money Universal Motwon) is now slated to be released eight weeks from now, on July 21st. However, the promise by the rapper that it would be an all rock album is up for debate. Still, regardless of whatever music is on the new Southern rap artist's album, Rebirth is a guaranteed future hit.

Originally billed as a "rock album" by the artist, born Dwayne Michael Carter, Jr, who has cited Kurt Cobain in interviews as being among his major influences, Rebirth has caused controversy among rap fans who fear that their hero had deserted the genre he came to fame in. In fact, the first single off Rebirth, the rocking, guitar laced "Prom Queen" (video below), didn't chart nearly as well as some past Wayne hits. Some have speculated that this was part of the reason for the album's delay and its genre reformatting to more of a rap than a rock album.

"The influence of the new album is mainly rock...a little different than they [the fans] have been used to," offered Lil Wayne in his recent Soundcheck interview. "We just used the title rock cos we didn't want people to think I am too different so therefore we put the title on the music before they do. But really it's just more Lil Wayne maturing," he said in an interview on The View four weeks ago. Meanwhile Bryan "Baby" Williams (aka Birdman -- one half of BIg Tymers), Cash Money Records co-CEO and mentor to Lil Wayne, informed Vibe magazine that, “It’s not a rock record...That’s what I think people are getting misunderstood. When you speaking about a rock record, you think he’s got a guitar and everything, but it’s not that."

Back to the Future Marathon at the New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, May 28, 2009 12:03am | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!




Friday & Saturday
May 29 & 30


Back to
the Future Trilogy Marathon!


Actress Claudia Wells, Jennifer from the first film, will appear in person both nights to discuss the film!

All Tickets $10
One tickets admits you to all three films

Back to the Future 7:30pm

Back to the Future Part II 10:00pm

Back to the Future Part III 11:59pm


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036



Be sure to check out Claudia Wells' new website www.armaniwells.com, too!

Beach Party 2009

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 27, 2009 10:07pm | Post a Comment
andy williams happy heart lp coverorquesta del recuerdo lp covernajee lp cover
We're expecting a heatwave, so here's a nice round of beach themed covers...
charlie barnet quartet jazz oasis lp coverrod mckuen seasons in the sunn II lp cover
romanovsky & phillips trouble in paradise lp coversandy owens ensemble montage lp covertma beach party 2000
a date with riverside lp coverjimmy buffett riddles in the sand lp covernat king cole those lazy hazy crazy days of summer
I know that the Jazz Oasis cover is supposed to be desert, but it looks like the Pismo Beach sand dunes to me.
trigo limpio lp covertammy wynette only lonely sometimes lp coveriguana the winds of alamar lp cover
los joao vamos a la playa lp coverhard rock hits lp coverthis is steve & eydie lp cover
Although I love the Date With Riverside cover above, the Enrique Jorrin LP below is my personal favorite of the bunch.
call of the midnight sun lp coverorquesta enriques jorrin lp covertornader hit it again lp cover

Asian-American Cinema Part VI - the 2000s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 27, 2009 04:00pm | Post a Comment
INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN-AMERICAN CINEMA

The first efforts to combat negative racial stereotypes of Asians and Asian-Americans in film began in the silent era, when a few empowered figures attempted to create an alternative Asian-American Silent Cinema. After their efforts faltered, Hollywood provided most cinematic images of Asians in the '30s, 40s, 50s, and '60s. With the birth of Asian-American theater, Asian-American cinema was revived in the 1970s and began to take off as a viable independent cinema in the 1980s. By the '90s, the scope of Asian-American Cinema broadened considerably, a trend that continued in the 2000s.

APAMERICA IN THE 2000s
In the 2000s, Asians became the fastest growing racial minority in the county. As of 2006, there were over thirteen million Americans of Asian descent (not counting Native people). Of the top ten languages spoken in American homes (English, Spanish, Chinese, French, German, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Korean, Italian and Russian), four are Asian.

Glen Hansard of The Frames and The Swell Season Chats

Posted by Miss Ess, May 27, 2009 01:51pm | Post a Comment
Irishman Glen Hansard's band The Frames has been quietly (at least Stateside) putting out strong, earnest rock records since the early 90s. Everything changed in 2007, when an excellent, endearing low budget indie film called Once, starring Glen and Marketa Irglova and studded with songs written by the pair, exploded into the mainstream due to massive positive word of mouth buzz. Glen and Marketa were swept along all the way to the Oscars, where they performed one of the songs from the movie, "Falling Slowly." By the end of the night they had won the Academy Award for Best Original Song! Since then, Glen and Marketa have been touring relentlessly as The Swell Season and earning rave reviews across the globe for their performances. Their backing band is often The Frames! Glen was kind enough to chat with me about his inspirations, what he's recording now, Van Morrison, and, of course, the Oscar moment. Read on for the interview:

glen hansard once

Miss Ess: You were in the studio in Feb recording -- can you tell us a little more about what you were recording and how it's sounding? What's coming up next for you?


Glen: Yes -- we [Marketa and several Frames members] were in the studio in February and March and April and finally it's done. I'm in New York right now mastering the final sequence; I'm happy with it. I'll go back to Ireland for a few days after this, swell season at amoebathen [Marketa and I] go to Korea and Japan to follow up on a tour we did recently that went well, so they invited us back to do some follow up dates. After that I think I'll rent a place in New York for the summer before going back on tour proper in late August early September.

Vinyl Confidential, 1.1 – the odd order of oblong boxes

Posted by Whitmore, May 26, 2009 08:34pm | Post a Comment

Why the record boxes? Why the art work? Why the hell don’t I write more about dumpster diving? Many questions are piling up here on the ol’ TV tray…
 
The theory goes: Disorder increases with record collecting because we measure collecting in the direction in which disorder increases.
 
Any theory is always provisional, in the sense that it is only a hypothesis: you can never prove it, no matter how long you may scream into somebody’s contrarian ear, or pound your fist into a table or a disagreeing face. And no matter how many times the results of experiments agree with some theory, you can never be sure that the next time around the result will not contradict your precious little theory. But as philosopher of science Karl Popper has emphasized, a good theory is characterized by the fact that it makes a number of predictions that could in principle be disproved or falsified by observation and survive.
 
For example, each time a new box of records with distinctive artwork is observed to agree with the predictions, like selling quickly, that’s a good thing. The theory, ‘art covered record boxes are cool', not only survived but found revival. Hallelujah and pass the collection plate! Our confidence is increased! But if a new box, covered in great artwork, is put out on the floor yet contains only random, scratched, dusty and chipped records, sprinkled with rat poop, the resulting observations may be a bit negative. We may feel obligated to abandon or modify the theory, even though this collection of records didn’t match the usual criteria. Nevertheless the theory of ‘artwork on record boxes’ is still solid. However, amending our assumptions is not out of the question, especially if we have to deal with irate customers and a significant berating by management. A slight re-adjustment in the theory might conclude that the art work is just the carrot, and yes, you can lead a record geek to water, but without any water in the 45 box to wash down that rat poop stuck in his throat … well, you know … anyway, next time around we should just toss those ruined, scratched records in the dumpster and note; disorder increases because we tend to measure in the direction in which disorder increases.

SEEKING DISTINCTION IN OVERCROWDED ONLINE NETWORKS

Posted by Billyjam, May 26, 2009 01:39pm | Post a Comment
MySpace
Way back in August 2006  -- a relative eternity ago in this fast-paced, ever changing Internet age -- MySpace hit the 100 million members mark, an accomplishment that blew peoples' minds at the time. That was three years ago, when MySpace was king and Facebook, while two years in existence, was still far from the force it is today. Meanwhile, Twitter was just a little baby born that year and something that comparatively few knew about. My, how things change! In March this year, a Nielsen.com blog ranked Twitter as the fastest-growing site in the Member Communities category for February 2009 when it had an astounding growth rate of 1382%. That same month of this year Facebook enjoyed a growth rate of 228%.

Around that time, the site compete.com compiled the interesting Top 25 Social Networks Re-Rank chart (below) that Social Networking Top 25includes the monthly visits each social networking site received for the first month of this year and ranked them in popularity accordingly. Even though MySpace, the once most popular social networking website, has slipped down to the number two position and many people have deserted it in favor of Facebook, it still continues to attract new members and hang onto old ones, including countless artists and musicians.

Music makers from all genres and at various stages along in their careers, from established global acts to young aspiring rappers and rockers, all vie for attention on MySpace since is very difficult to stand apart and get noticed these days with so much competition out there.

Asian-American Cinema Part V - the 1990s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 26, 2009 11:55am | Post a Comment

INTRO TO ASIAN-AMERICAN CINEMA

In the silent film era, a few Asian-Americans braved decidedly limited opportunities and even attempted to create a cinematic outlet for their voices. By the dawn of the sound era, Asian-American cinema disappeared and Hollywood once again controlled depictions and roles. In the post-war era, roles for Asian-American actors grew in number, if not diversity. As a result, Asian-American theater arose to fill the void, ultimately leading to the rebirth of an authentic Asian-American Cinema that grew slowly over the next two decades before expanding rapidly in the '90s and continuing in the 2000s.

APA DEMOGRAPHIC MILESTONES IN THE '90s

The 1990s were a time of tremendous growth in the Asian-American population, resulting in a notable demographic milestone when Monterey Park became the first Asian-American majority city on the US mainland. It was soon followed by several others, including Cerritos, Cupertino, Daly City, Milpitas and Rowland Heights in California as well as Millbourne in Pennsylvania.

Aircraft

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 25, 2009 11:40pm | Post a Comment
nine inch nails ghosts i-iv record labelpurpose alpha & omega record labelkim carnes barking at airplanes record label
three mile pilot record labeltheory of flight record label
flyboys record label
ub40 signing of record labelglobo records labelorbit airwaves record label
scott merritt gravity is mutual record labeljet-age records labelbeulah coast is never clear record label
country music time record labelflying dutchman record labellaurie anderson mr. heartbreak record label
visa record labelwar bride record labelduran duran decade record label

Asian-American Cinema Part IV - Asian-American Cinema - 1970s and 1980s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 25, 2009 04:16pm | Post a Comment
ASIAN-AMERICAN CINEMA

After short-lived attempts in the silent era to establish an Asian-American Cinema, for most of the in the first and second halves of the studio era, Hollywood single-handedly created and controlled almost all celluloid images of Asian-Americans. With the beginnings of Asian-American theater in the 1960s and its growth in the 1970s coinciding with the decline of the Hollywood studio system, all that began to change with the rebirth of Asia-American Cinema, albeit slowly at first. Only in the 1990s and 2000s has a large and diverse Asian-American cinema, Asian-American theater and Asian-American comedy scene truly flourished -- offering a viable alternative to Hollywood's continued stereotypes and ongoing homogeneity.

Orphaned Cambodian Children Vietnamese Boat People

THE CHANGING FACE OF ASIAN-AMERICA IN THE '70S

In the 1970s, more than 130,000 refugees arrived from Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, drastically changing the make-up of the Asian-American population. Broadly speaking, this wave of immigrants had more in common socio-economically speaking with most blacks, Latinos and Natives; therein challenging the mid '60s-born concept of Asians as "the model minority."

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 5/25/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 25, 2009 03:12pm | Post a Comment

New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:

Diskokaine

BIKININI DJ FUNK RMX 12"
GOMMADT002

DISKOKAINE (produced by SALLY SHAPIRO) rips out this club- focused, high energy electro tech record chock full of ear piercing synths & big room fuzz. Includes a ghetto-tech remix by DJ FUNK and two other storming remixes from TELONIUS and CHRISTOPHER JUST.

Beatfanatic
-
BERLIN NIGHTS & P.O.D. 12" SCR017


Nick
Thayer - PARTY PEOPLE-VS.W.STYLES 12" BOMB015T

DO BELIEVE THE HYPE SURROUNDING GRIZZLY BEAR

Posted by Billyjam, May 25, 2009 06:52am | Post a Comment
Grizzly Bear "Two Weeks" video by Patrick Daughters from the new album Veckatimest on
Warp Records - official release date tomorrow but available today at Amoeba Music

The buzz surrounding Brooklyn's Grizzly Bear and the anticipation for their new album Veckatimest on Warp Records is well justifiedGrizzly Bear Veckatimest. The record will be officially released tomorrow (May 26th), but is available exclusively today at Amoeba! Grizzly Bear is the sort of muscial group that comes along way too rarely: one that is truly original yet somehow familiar sounding, and also extremely talented. Their music draws you in with timeless melodies and harmonies so beautiful that they might make you weep, but will definitely remind you of snatches of a myriad of other (mostly bygone) great rock/pop/folk acts including the Beach Boys, Simon & Garfunkel, and even a bit of Radiohead (who they opened for on part of their North American tour last summer).

Comprised of guitarists/songwriters Ed Droste and Daniel Rossen, along with drummer/vocalist Christopher Bear and multi-instrumentalist Chris Taylor (bass/electronics/woodwinds/vocals), Grizzly Bear released their first record as a quartet in 2006. Yellow House came out on Warp and included their infectious song "Knife" (see video below). Although released under the name Grizzly Bear, 2004's Horn Of Plenty on Kanine Records was really an Ed Droste solo release. Most recently, in late 2007, they released the EP Friend.

Asian-American Cinema Part III - Asian-Americans in Hollywood - The 1950s & 1960s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 24, 2009 04:58pm | Post a Comment
Before the dominance of Hollywood, most Asian-American actors roles were limited to the background and in offensive roles. Two APA actors, Anna May Wong and Sessue Hayakawa, nonetheless became superstars. They and a few other pioneers attempted to produce a genuinely Asian-American Cinema in the silent era.

By the dawn of
the studio era, Hollywood was the dominant voice in American film and Asian-American actors were once again limited to stereotypical roles, often in supporting roles for white actors in yellowface. Largely due to the influence of Asian-American theater and the efforts of those APA players involved, an authentic Asian-American Cinema was reborn in the '70s and '80s, ultimately expanding and diversifying in the 1990s and 2000s.

Asian-American Cinema Part II - Asian-Americans in Hollywood - The 1930s & 1940s

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 24, 2009 04:57pm | Post a Comment
If opportunities for Asian-Americans in silent film were decidedly limited, they seem to have actually worsened with the coming of sound. Several actors with Asian origins returned home, no doubt frustrated by the increasing lack of work available to them in American films. The attempts by Marion Wong, Sessue Hawakaya and Anna May Wong to create an alternative to the degrading roles and yellowface of Hollywood had fizzled. For most of the Hollywood studio era, there were few works made by Asian filmmakers and Hollywood controlled depictions of Asians (with the exception of some American made Cantonese-language films exhibited overseas). 

In the 1950s and '60s
, little would change. It wasn't until the decline of the studio system and the birth of Asian-American theater that there would Asian-American Cinema be reborn, ultimately expanding and diversifying in the 1990s and 2000s.

In the 1930s, series' like Charlie Chan, Fu Manchu, Mr. Moto and Mr. Wong furthered perceptions of Asian mysteriousness, whilst films like The Bitter Tea of General Yen, The Good Earth and others suggested that America’s taste for minstrelsy had simply taken on a new shade. Some Asian American actors nonetheless attempted to start careers. Merle Oberon was able to get starring roles after concocting a phony story about her origins and using skin whitening make-up. Philip Ahn, after rejection for speaking English too well, braved death threats after playing Japanese villains. Meanwhile, Anna May Wong worked abroad in less degrading roles.

Your Pals Are Not What They Seem 1: Faith and Reason in Lost's Season 5 Finale

Posted by Charles Reece, May 24, 2009 10:32am | Post a Comment
When Twin Peaks veers into the conventions of illusionism, which pay homage to the rationalist's faith in a phallic force and properly directed will, the series loses its sense of the benign subconscious and the affirming power of femininity. In the later episodes, the seeker regresses into a stereotypical hero. Proper reason directing Cooper's will becomes the heroic focus of the action against the typical perverse will and reason of the villain. The traditional conquest of Earle -- not the desire to see -- becomes the desire of the series. -- Martha P. Nochimson, David Lynch: Wild at Heart in Hollywood, p. 93

The only thing Columbus discovered was that he was lost! -- Wyndom Earle

lost jacob nemesis season 5

Since Ron Moore and colleagues sank my Battlestar, the only show I've cared about is Lost. As the former demonstrated, TV is determined by its own law of entropy, where any show gets worse in direct proportion to the length of time it's on times the structural quality (plot, characters, diegesis, etc.) that the creators initially developed. Clearly, BSG went on for about 2 years longer than the initial fund of creativity allowed. Its keg was all but tapped by the beginning of the third season. Given its tenuous beginning, Moore probably thought his show wouldn't make it much past the mini-series, hoping that he'd at least have one of those cult-celebrated shows that could've been. On the other side of the coin, TV executives don't much care about quality, but about how long they can wring some advertising dollars out of the shows they're broadcasting. As such, they are creatures of chaos, encouraging the steady dissolution of the creative order; they are, in a word, demonic. It's the nature of the beast that creators have to get in bed with these incubi to give birth to a TV show. This Faustian dialectic requires as much blind faith from the creators as it does money being thrown about by investors. Little wonder, then, why so many SF-fantasy shows are predisposed to defending faith over reason. As articles of faith in the face of overwhelming odds, they came into being as the result of big, dumb chance.

x-files believe

A classic example is X-Files, which burned out after the third season and whose endings justified every ludicrous theory the conspiracist Agent Mulder came up with. After a few years of this, the skepticism of Agent Scully's ratiocinations came across as implausible, or just plain dumb. Faith in something that's demonstratively true isn't really faith; it's empirical knowledge. Contrary to some interpretations, X-Files didn't really analyze the role of faith, so much as side-step it by making the supernatural natural. You'd be one stupid hobbit to doubt magic in Middle-Earth. The hero in an absurdist universe can either fight it like Agent 6 did in The Prisoner, or just embrace it like Maxwell Smart in Get Smart. On the former journey -- Kafkaesque in its structure -- lies madness, cancellation and no end to the story, much like what waits for the rationalist in the real world; on the latter, you get a better chance at a few more seasons, but, like a business going public and expanding, the product begins to feel like a cheap imitation (just look at X-Files).

Contrariwise, David Lynch and Mark Frost built the possibility for endless expansion into Twin Peaks with the mystery of Laura Palmer's murder -- what Lynch has called "the golden goose." They intended to keep it ongoing indefinitely while exploring the epiphenomenal mysteries arising from the central investigation. ABC felt that endless mystery would tax the faith of viewers, and "asked" the creators to wrap up the Laura storyline in the second season. The end of that mystery wasn't all that killed the show's élan: both Frost and Lynch went away to work on other projects, turning the reins over to a bunch of cheap Lynch clones, resulting in a whole lot of James and Lucy. It was with the return of Frost that the show began to regain some sense of direction, but more along the lines of the classic good versus evil struggle to which Nochimson alludes in the above quote. Agent Cooper now had a Moriarty, Wyndom Earle, a damsel in distress, Annie, and there was a white lodge to go along with the black one -- tropes that a Jungian once called archetypes, but are now known as clichés. Nochimson is herself a Jungian feminist who sees Cooper as a hero-seeker, a protagonist who leaves himself open to questions, tapping into the universal unconscious, rather than one who is out to conquer the Other. Openness, you see, is the province of universal femininty -- think the woman's classic coital role ('classic' should here be read as another synonym for 'cliché', or 'stereotype'). Reason is phallic, controlling, penetrating, and thusly the province of masculinity.

twin peaks cooper unconscioustwin peaks season 2 cooper

Despite the reductionistic men-are-from-Mars-women-from-Venus rhetoric, Nochimson's book gets it right that Lynch isn't much of an us-versus-them sort of narrator. As becomes increasingly evident from Blue Velvet to Inland Empire, all of his protagonists possess a Hermann Hesse-duality that drives the narrative more than some external battle with another. However, Cooper is his purest hero, only shown to face his dark side when Lynch returned for season 2's finale. By listening to his dreams and going with his occult intuition, Cooper might be considered a man of faith, albeit one who doesn't put all his eggs in one basket. (These eggs aren't of the hysterical kind, though.) But he was until the final episode, and against Nochimson's reading, always in control. He asked the right questions and proffered the best hypotheses again and again. I'd say, given the preternatural realm of Twin Peaks, Cooper belongs philosophically with his cohort Agent Mulder to Noam Chomsky's brand of rationalism. ("Mulder" even pops up in Twin Peaks as an FBI investigator in drag, an agent of scientifico-rationalism mocking the identity politics inherent in Nochimson's account.)


Against the bottom-feeding positivism of behaviorism that was dominant back in the 50s, Chomsky countered that unobservable mental models (the a priori, or given) were necessary to understand linguistic behavior. Scientific discovery, like language learning, is guided by models, where one has an initial theory that undergoes modification as experience dictates (I speak loosely here, so see these entries on Universal Grammar and Modularity if you're curious). If the data is consistent with the theoretical model, no change is necessary; it is, for all intents and purposes, rational knowledge. Mulder and Cooper's seemingly outlandish theories might not work in our world, but they tended to be confirmed by (were consistent with their experiences in) their own diegeses. Their faith is more analogous to David Hume believing that one billiard ball will move when struck by another, i.e., it always had in the past (as far as he knew).

Gleaming the Cube Tonight at the New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, May 23, 2009 03:27pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!




Saturday May 23

Gleaming
The Cube


EXTREMELY RARE 35mm Print! Actor Art Chudabala (Christian Slater's brother in the movie) IN PERSON plus other special guests & surprises!


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7



May
May 29 & 30 Back To The Future Triple Feature
All Three Movies - Two Nights Only!
BttF: 7:30pm, BttF2: 10pm, BttF3: Midnight
$10 Triple Feature Ticket

June
June 2-8 New Beverly Film Explosion!
We take over the New Bev for a full week of double (and triple) features of MOVIE MANIA! Each show starts at 7:30pm.

June 2
Class of 1984 with 3:15 The Moment Of Truth

Reach Out, I'll Be There!!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 23, 2009 11:26am | Post a Comment
kiss the elder lp coverfake problems how far our bodies go lp coverdokken tooth and nail lp cover
The Roc Lochner cover below always cracks me up, it's got such a Manowar-ish earnesty about the power of rock!
roc lochner lp coverratt lp covertrance power infusion lp cover
toxic shock welcome home lp covergentle giant free hand lp coverdark angel darness descends lp cover
bravo, mantovani lp coverherbie hancock mr. hands lp coverllyod price mr. personality's 15 hits lp cover
Terry Garthwaite's arty period is represented below. This Raffeys cover is amazing!
terry garthwaite hand in glove lp coverhome and garden hideout lp coverraffeys eep snorpsh now! lp cover
clarice Labbe Charlie Hampton lp coverjethro tull rock island lp coverslave visions of the litle lp cover
Jethro Tull give Roc Lochner a run for their money. Not only the power of Rock, but the power of Flute-Rock! Trance obviously digs the bare arm thing, as we've got two of their covers in this batch.
strawbs hero & heroine lp covertrance break out lp coverfixx shattered room lp cover

LIGHT IN THE ATTIC RECORDS' WEST COAST ROAD TRIP

Posted by Billyjam, May 23, 2009 09:35am | Post a Comment
Light In The Attic
On Memorial Day --this Monday, May 25th, sometime between 1 and 2 in the afternoon, four guys from Light In The Attic Records (LITA) up in Seattle are expected to roll through the doors of Amoeba Music on Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood.

The four may look tired and understandably so, as it will be Day 8 of their unique road trip that will take them from Seattle to San Diego and back. But expect the LITA four and the Amoeba folks who greet them all to be smiling widely once they peep the cool music these guys are coming armed with -- all from LITA's deep catalog: stacks of wax, rarities, and lots of goodies from the indie label known for its roster of reissue projects and its distribution catalog, with artists including Serge Gainsbourg and The Monks.

On Monday last, May 18th, they crammed thousands upon thousands of pieces of music into their van and since then have driven all the way down from Seattle, through Tacoma and Olympia, then through Oregon and into California, stopping all along the way at a total of 50 indie record stores to personally Black Daisy Light In The Attic road tripdeliver the goodies. This 50 store/10 day/3000 mile music road trip will take them as far south as San Diego. Then it's back north and inland to Sacramento, their last stop before heading home to Seattle by Friday, May 29th. For those of you with calanders asking, doesn't that then make it an 11 or 12 day trip? Well, technically it is still 10 days, since the record store part of the operation runs from May 18th to the 28th.

This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, May 22, 2009 09:22am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

The full May / June Calendar is online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday May 22 & 23


Charles Bronson Badass Cinema

The Mechanic (1972)
He has 100 ways to kill... and they all work!
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0068931/
dir. Michael Winner, starring Charles Bronson, Jan-Michael Vincent, Keenan Wynn, Jill Ireland
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 3:25 & 7:30, Watch The Trailer!

Mr. Majestyk (1974)
He didn't want to be hero... until the day they pushed him too far.
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0071866/
dir. Richard Fleischer, written by Elmore Leonard
starring Charles Bronson, Al Lettieri, Linda Cristal, Lee Purcell
Fri: 9:30; Sat: 5:25 & 9:30, Watch The Trailer!

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 05:22:09

Posted by Billyjam, May 22, 2009 07:00am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Hollywood Hip-Hop Top Five: 05:22:09
eminem
1) Eminem Relapse (Shady/Aftermath/Interscope)

2) Method Man & Redman Blackout! 2 (Def Jam)

3 Busta Rhymes Back On My B.S. (Flipmode/Universal Motown)

4) Tanya Morgan Brooklynati (Interdependent Media)

5)  DOOM Born Like This (Lex Records)

Released this week, Relapse, the sixth studio album from Eminem, went straight to number one on the Amoeba Music Hip-Hop chart. And most likely this anticipated album from Slim Shady, produced by Dr Dre, willl also top most other charts this week, including Billboard's. Even though many critics have already panned the album, most saying that the once controversial Em is now attempting to stilll sound shocking and merely duplicating his old formula with a twist of Reggaton, most music fans are hungry for, or at least curious to hear what Eminem Version 2009 is all about. After all, it is the artist's first new album in five long rap years -- since he dropped Encore in 2004 -- which is a virtual eternity in the ever shapeshifting hip-hop genre. Typically, fickle rap fans move on but Eminem ain't no ordinary rapper and a lot of people want to see/hear what's new with the artist who withdrew himself from the world and became dependent on prescription drugs. 

In true Eminem tradition, his personal life -- in this case his openly admitted addiction to prescription drugs and some other issues, including, of course, his mother -- is fuel (fodder?) for his art. And drugs are certainly a prominent theme on Relapse, and not just the repeated lyrical references. The album cover spelling of the name Relapse cleverly utilizes the "Rx" symbol as used in prescriptions (Dr. Dre, naturally, is the prescribing doctor), while the cover art illustration of the artirt's head (above) is mademethodman redman up by a mosaic of thousands of pills.

Palm Springs Film Noir Festival @ Camelot Theatres

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 22, 2009 12:55am | Post a Comment

Lately I've been making more of an effort to take small trips out of town. Recent trips to the Shady Dell in Bisbe, AZ and the Red Fox Room (hang out in Marion Davies' old living room!) in San Diego have proven to be quite enjoyable, so we're going try out a little Palm Springs action. The festival is a great excuse to drive out into the desert & this year's schedule is packed with true rarities, so we're going to try to cram in at least 5 movies into 2 days.  Anybody out there that can recommend any must see Palm Springs curiosities, let me know...








STEVIE NICKS SONG GETS NEW LEASE ON LIFE FROM KIDS @ PS22

Posted by Billyjam, May 21, 2009 09:34pm | Post a Comment
fleetwood mac
Above is the wonderful recent version of the timeless Stevie NIcks/Fleetwood Mac song "Landslide" sung by the PS22 Chorus, which is a children's choir of about sixty kids from a New York City public elementary school. Since this video was posted on YouTube yesterday (May 20) by Agreggofsociety, who works with these kids and is seen/heard playing guitar in the piece, it has gotten close to 80,000 hits. And no wonder: it is hard not to be moved by the power of these young souls pouring their hearts into the song. Their hand and facial gestures alone just grab you.

Below is Stevie Nicks with Lindsey Buckingham singing "Landslide" on the Late Show with David Letterman twelve years ago when the song appeared on the live album The Dance. The original version can be found on the band's 1975 album Fleetwood Mac and to this day remains a favorite amongst both Fleetwood Mac and Stevie Nicks fans as well as many other artists who have covered it over the years.


Love Land

Posted by Whitmore, May 21, 2009 04:24pm | Post a Comment
I planned on posting this several days ago but I too was in the midst of dealing with the ol’ wrecking ball. Euphemistically speaking…
 
Love Land, China’s first sex theme park, expected to open in October, has already been demolished. The powers that be, jolted by the worldwide publicity, brought in the wrecking ball before such a crude establishment could blight the good city of Chongqing.
 
The developers had billed the attraction as tasteful and socially beneficial theme park full of informative displays on all things ‘sex.’ A quick investigation determined the park's content was vulgar and that it was neither healthy nor educational and would be an “evil influence” on the culture.
 
Love Land had promised to make available workshops to help visitors improve their sexual technique and advice on safe sex, along with a detailed history of sex thru the ages.
 
Once the decision was made a demolition team moved in posthaste, first knocking down the giant revolving pair of women's legs standing over the entrance and then moving on to the giant genitalia.

out this week 5/12 & 5/19...tori amos...iron & wine...true blood...jarvis cocker...bricolage...

Posted by Brad Schelden, May 21, 2009 12:40pm | Post a Comment
six feet under cast
When I first moved to Los Angeles 7 or 8 years ago I became obsessed with Six Feet Under. I remember going to work one day and one of my coworkers talked about the show for hours. She couldn't believe that I was not watching it. However, I didn't have HBO and I don't think the show was out on DVD yet. I didn't even have a DVD player yet. VHS releases of TV shows were starting to disappear so I didn't really have any way to watch it-- so it might have been Six Feet Under that made me finally give in and get a DVD player. My first DVD purchase was The Muppet Movie, but I think my second or third purchase was the first season of Six Feet Under. It had been a while since I had been obsessed with a really good TV show. I still managed to watch the entire Twin Peaks series about once a year, but there wasn't much else out there. It was just that I didn't have HBO. I had heard about all these new shows, but still had never watched Oz or the Sopranos. These shows would later become some of my favorites as I started to collect the DVDs and eventually was forced to get HBO again. I don't want to sound like an advertisement for HBO, but it really did change the way I looked at TV and really gave me many enjoyable viewing hours. Six Feet Under came at a perfect time in my life. The show took place in the Los Angeles area and was filmed just down the street from Amoeba at the Gower studios. I somehow felt the show was speaking directly to me. And I somehow felt more involved with it since it was filmed so close to me and took place in a city so close to my heart. It was also nice to see a gay character as one of the lead roles in a drama series. I have always had a love/hate sort of relationship with Los Angeles, but this show made me love it just a little bit more. The five seasons of the show took me on a long and intense journey. I fell in love with all the characters and started to think of them as my family. The show followed me back to San Francisco, where it eventually ended in 2005. This was one of those shows that I really did love but it also just sort of tortured me when I watched it. Not only was every episode dealing with somebody's death, but it was also dealing with all the characters' messed up lives at the same time. It was an intense journey. The thing that made this show so fantastic was the cast. The mix of the brilliant writing with the perfect cast was a magical combination -- and it doesn't really happen that often. The leads were all perfect. Peter Krause, Michael C. Hall, and Lauren Ambrose were perfect as the siblings of the house. Frances Conroy was brilliant as their mother. The show just had a list of some of my favorite or soon to be favorite actors -- Rachel Griffiths, Freddy Rodriguez, Jeremy Sisto, Lili Taylor, Kathy Bates, Richard Jenkins, Rainn Wilson, Justin Theroux, Mena Suvari, Veronica Cartwright, Illeana Douglas, and Catherine O'Hara. And Patricia Clarkson and Joanna Cassidy were nothing short of brilliant as the aunt and mother in law. I wish they could have been in every episode, I don't think any TV show will ever get a better cast...although Mad Men comes very close.

New Electronic CD Releases 5/21/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 21, 2009 10:46am | Post a Comment
Dark music for Dark Warehouses...
Heinrichs & Hirtenfeliner
HEINRICHS & HIRTENFELLNER

Dark Orbit CD (HIGHGRADE 062CD)

This is the debut full-length release on Highgrade by Berlin-based Heinrichs & Hirtenfellner. The duo asked the question: "Is there life in outer space?" and were answered easily by the sound-universe that they created on Dark Orbit. From the mesmerizing glitter of "Supernova," to the funky vocal cuts drifting through "Starry Fog," to the off-the-beaten-track explorations of "Hubble," this album maps out new galaxies and star systems of sound. "Quantum Jump" is a springboard to a parallel universe made out of pulsating bass and vocal sequences, echoing to us from the depths of space. The "Black Hole" in Heinrichs & Hirtenfellner's world works somehow backwards -- instead of eating energy, it spills all over -- making the impact of this track as powerful as a meteor storm. "Alpha Particle" sounds like a lunar probe on speed, while "My Gravitation" shows perfectly how to build massive club-hits from dreamy sequences. Despite all this journeying, Dark Orbit never gets lost: it remains a fresh club album that always shows a subtle grasp of humor, weird sounds, and small oddities -- the perfection of the added human touch. The CD version also includes small interludes which serve as anchoring, central themes, like map-coordinates on a pleasant flight.

Exercise One
EXERCISE ONE
In Cars We Rust
(MOBILEE 008CD)

This is the debut full-length release by Berlin duo Exercise One (Marco Freivogel and Ingo Gansera). DJs know them as crafters of cracking tracks on wax. Clubbers around the world know them as an unstoppable live act. Now, prepare to meet another side of Exercise One. On In Cars We Rust, the dancefloor stormers are still here, and the record's flow is guided by the same spirit of improvisation that drives their live sets. But the clubbier material is rounded out by sounds we've never heard from Exercise One before: gorgeous, enveloping ambient tracks; soundtrack-ready synthesizer ballads; even a kind of retro-futurist electro-pop. In Cars We Rust is the studio product of their hands-on approach, as passages of spontaneous creation are edited, collaged and remixed into a strikingly varied, startlingly cohesive whole. "Circeo" comes on like dawn, with a rustle of percussion and muted horns giving way to slowly unfurling chords and gentle electro-acoustic chatter -- featuring Seth Josel on guitar, it's an ambient palate-cleanser to prep you for the deep-listening experience to follow. The beats begin on "1994," which eases out of the intro with shimmering keys and a shimmying beat, nearly dissolving into bubbly echoes of Steve Reich. "It Is Happening Again" features home-hewn breaks and a monster bass line courtesy of Jacopo Carreras. "Trapdoor" cools off with a taut, undulating spiral of metallic percussion and oscillators. "The Drunken Tinman" is low-slung funk, skipping dry drum machines across a sludge-pool of charred, muddied bass and dubby chords. After that, "Good Kid" rouses with cinematic strings and a drunken piano line. "No News Today" features Argenis Brito's distinctive vocals, and is the perfect fusion of electronic production with a classic pop sensibility. "Sleeper" boasts lush chords, diamond-tipped drums and spiraling oscillators. "What You Say" is a lean, mean percussive groover, and "Don't Slip" slows the tempo and loses itself in a field of freaky bleeps. The breathtaking finale "Just Not!" feels like an amalgam of all of Exercise One's deepest tendencies, as ropy bass lines, dissipating chords and intricate rhythms spin together into a hypnotic, pulsing whole.

May 20, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, May 21, 2009 12:23am | Post a Comment
Ghosts of Girlfriends Past ticket stubb Chinese 6

PUT ANOTHER DIME IN THE JUKEBOX BABY

Posted by Billyjam, May 20, 2009 10:11pm | Post a Comment

I am sure that I am not alone when I say that I love "I Love Rock'n Roll," the song popularized by Joan Jett & The Blackhearts, who released it from the album of the same name in 1981. The hugely successful record went to number one on the Billboard singles chart and #2 on the Billboard albums chart.
joan jett i love rock n roll
Distingushed by its irrisistable handclap and beat and killer guitar lick, "I Love Rock'n Roll"'s writing and first recording is often mistakenly credited to Jett. But it was Alan Merrill and Jake Hooker of the Mickie Most produced, British based group The Arrows who wrote the song and first recorded it six years earlier in 1975 (originally as a B-side on RAK Records). Their version is below in a clip from their weekly Granada Television program The Arrows Show.

I am curious to know which version people think is better, so if you have a moment, please write which version you prefer in the comments below. Note that songwriter Alan Merrill of The Arrows is an American who moved to London, hence the original line he wrote is "put another dime," whereas if he had been British born, it probably would have been something like "Put another 10 pence in the jukebox baby."

the arrowsOver the years "I Love Rock'n Roll" has been covered by many artists. Britney Spears covered the song for the 2002 movie Crossroads (movie clip below), and it has been used in many other movies too, including the 2006 film The Covenant, which featured the Joan Jett version in a bar with jukebox scene.

ProtestationTartare

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 20, 2009 09:14pm | Post a Comment

Today an estimated 15,000 Crimean Tatars gathered in Simferopol, Ukraine to mark the 65th anniversary of their forced deportation at the hands of Soviet authorities under Stalin. In 1944, approximately 200,000 Crimean Tatars were loaded onto trains and sent to Siberia, with roughly half dying along the way.


Since the collapse of the USSR, many have returned to their ancestral homelands, joining the 280,000 who currently live there. Around 150,000 have expressed their intention to return.


Many of the protesters held aloft their national flag and voiced their demands, which include calls for national recognition, autonomy and Crimean Tatar schools.

  

Without a doubt, the most famous Tatar in American popular culture of Tatar ancestry is actor Charles Bronson. They also gave us steak Tartare.


Become a fan of Eric's Blog on Facebook!

Smoke!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 20, 2009 12:10pm | Post a Comment
boz scaggs middle man lp coverstan kenton hair lp coverryan adams heartbreaker lp cover
I figured that this would be a good follow up to my fire blog. After I launched that one in honor of Pele, I realized that yesterday was the feast of Brighid and that I should have offered my work to her. So today, I make this tabacco offering to her.
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down to eartha kitt lp coverjackie gleason presents night winds lp covernilsson that's the way it is lp cover
Although the entire Jackie Gleason series has beautiful artwork, Night Winds is my favorite. Very sinister undercurrents flowing through the image.
divine comedy casanova lp coverpeter dayton love at 1st sight lp cover
garnett mimms has it all lp covermajor matt mason real 12" coverapollonia six back cover
The pic of Brenda Bennett on the above Apollonia 6 LP cracks me up because she always looked old to me when I was a kid, but in this picture she's probably younger than I am now. I love the way that the Straight Lines LP came out in this photo. The giant cat urine stain on the left adds so much. OK, I'm going off to smoke my Peterson now...
ronnie spector siren lp coverphillip lynott solo in soho lp coverstraight lines lp cover

Buford's Beach Bunnies

Posted by phil blankenship, May 19, 2009 09:50pm | Post a Comment
Buford's Beach Bunnies  Buford's Beach Bunnies

Buford's Beach Bunnies plot synopsis

Imperial Entertainment Corp 3409

PETULA CLARK'S UNIQUE SEVEN DECADE CAREER

Posted by Billyjam, May 19, 2009 05:29pm | Post a Comment
petula clark
76 year old English singer/composer/actress Petula Clark holds the distinction of being the most successful British female solo recording artist ever, with a career that spans seven decades and that has racked up record sales of over 70 million units. For this feat she has been recognized in the Guinness Book of World Records.

Additionally Clark was honored by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II during an investiture ceremony at Buckingham Palace in 1998 when she was made a CBE (Commander of the British Empire).

Clark, whose number one hits include "Downtown," "My Love" and "This Is My Song," and whose other big hits include "I Know A Place" and "Don't Sleep In The Subway" (video below), made her first public performace singing at age 7 as part of a retail store promotion.

Her professional career began a few years later when the talented young girl became an entertainer on BBC Radio during World War II when she performed an inspired rendition of "Mighty Lak' a Rose." Clark was a few weeks shy of celebrating her tenth birthday. She would go on to perform approximately 500 times in radio programmes designed to entertain the British troops during the War. At this same time she would tour the UK with (fellow child performer) Julie Andrews, earning herself the nickname of "Britain's Shirley Temple."


In 1944 (at age 12) she made her big screen debut in Medal For The General playing the character of Irma in the film. This led to her appearing in a string of films (many B-movies), includinpetula clark don't sleep in the subwayg Strawberry Roan, I Know Where I'm Going!, London Town, and Here Come the Huggetts. She continued making films, about 30 in all, for the next four decades. It was In 1949 when Clark, who had still to turn seventeen, released her first single and in 1954 scored her first top ten hit, "The Little Shoemaker," which would be the first of string of hits for the artist. 1961's "Sailor" would be her first UK #1 hit and "Downtown" (video below) would be her first US #1 hit single in 1964. The 1960's was her decade, with other Petula Clark hits including "I Know a Place," "My Love," "Colour My World," "A Sign of the Times," and "Don't Sleep in the Subway."

Cass McCombs' "Dreams Come True Girl"

Posted by Miss Ess, May 19, 2009 02:33pm | Post a Comment

Cass McCombs
is one of the best bubbling-just-under-the-radar songwriters around. Cass's got a new video out, fiercly featuring actress Karen Black (Five Easy Pieces, Easy Rider), as well as our own dear Greg in a skateboarding cameo, for his song "Dreams Come True Girl." The track is a sweet, ambling, highly hum-able song that will be on his upcoming album, Catacombs, out on Domino June 1. The single is also out now on 7". Check out the vid below:

May 18, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, May 19, 2009 12:25am | Post a Comment
Star Trek movie ticket stub
plus

Obsessed movie marquee



Fire!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 18, 2009 10:45pm | Post a Comment
canned heat vintage lp coversunshine band sound of lp coverbeyond the blue horizon lp cover george benson
I present this blog as an offering to the Goddess Pele. May she protect us through the upcoming fire season!
chanuka songs lp coverosmond brothers lp coverdelilah lp cover
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miss calypso maya angelou lp covercaptain and tennille come in from the rain lp coverwembley edwards fire goddess lp cover
michel legrand strings on fire lp covercarmen dragon tempo espanol lp cover
It's nice to see father and son in the same blog -- The Captain and his pop Carmen Dragon! If I could just fit the Surf Punks in somewhere it'd be an amazing hat trick!
moods for firelight lp cover francis scotthits explosivos! lp covermargot thomas move it lp cover

Gonzales' 27 hour solo performance breaks Guinness record

Posted by Billyjam, May 18, 2009 05:24pm | Post a Comment

The Canadian musician and producer Gonzales made history today when he broke the world record for the longest-ever solo gonzalezconcert. The 37-year-old artist, who was born Jason Charles Beck and currently lives in Paris, France, successfully played piano non-stop for 27 hours, three minutes and 44 seconds in a performance at the Cine Theatre 13 in Paris that began at midnight Saturday night (technically the very beginning of Sunday) and ran until just past 3am this morning (local French time).

The record-breaking concert by Gonzales was streamed through his website. It contained 300 pieces of music in varying lengths and included a diversity of works from the likes of Gershwin, Beethoven, Britney Spears, and Feist (a fellow Canadian artist he regularly collaborates with). In the video above from approximitely 5:30am yesterday, he is seen/heard performing the Feist piece.

The performer takes the new world title from the previous Guinness record-holder, Prasanna Gudi of India, who had played raga for 26 hours and 12 minutes in 2008. As reported by the the Ottawa Citizen, Guinness, who monitored the solo performance, did permit Gonzales to take a 15 minute break after each three-hour set and a 30-second pause in between songs.

Hardbodies

Posted by phil blankenship, May 17, 2009 10:21pm | Post a Comment
Hardbodies 80s T&A comedy  Hardbodies

Hardbodies plot synopsis

RCA / Columbia Pictures Home Video 60366

(During which the author continues to unpack.)

Posted by Job O Brother, May 17, 2009 10:20pm | Post a Comment
hard work
The author decorates his new Study.

It’s late. I’m tired. And earthquaked. I’d no sooner finished up my final box of bric-a-brac placement, when the latest in seismic waves rocked my little piece of Los Angeles.

What occurred in my imagination was far more dramatic than what actually took place. In my mind, my bookshelf toppled over on me and I was knocked unconscious by my collection of creepy, antique clowns and monkeys. Naturally the wound would cause me to fall into a coma, and since the boyfriend is in Vegas for the weekend, I wouldn’t be discovered until late tomorrow. Although he’d rush me to the hospital (taking time to wolf down a Cliff Builder Bar – this candy bar masquerading as a protein supplement he’s addicted to) and I’d be put on life-support, my vegetative state would last for days.

By the time I came out of the coma, I would have lost 180 pounds (making me a very fashionable 5 pounds) and my speech would sound like a recitation of Dada poetry. For some reason I’d be scared of celery, too, though the doctors would never understand why.

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 05/23/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 17, 2009 07:21pm | Post a Comment
 

New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:
 
Ghost - FREEDOM OF THOUGHT EP #1 12" BNB046
UK hip hop producer GHOST drops this dope as hell 5 track EP mixing 2 rap tracks and 3 beat driven instrumental head nodders that fans of NINJA TUNE, DJ SHADOW, RJD2 and the like will dig. One rap cut is a brand new remix of DJ IQ's "ELEVATE" feat JEHST on vocals. Don't sleep.
 
Tiga - SHOES 12" DIFB1216T 
First single from his forthcoming LP is a delicious slice of non conformist pop feat a mystery female guest and prod by SOULWAX! Killer mixes from MR OIZO and GREEN VELVET take this superstar DJ / fashion icon into the pop stratosphere. Not to be missed indeed.
 
Deborah Jordan - NOTHING LASTS 7" FM013
 
Future Beat Investigators - LOUDER 12" RAF048
 
Ghost - BASIC INSTINCT (NATURAL SELF) 12" BNB027
 
Ghost - LET EM KNOW 12" BNB017
 
Ghost - SELDOM SEEN OFTEN HEARD DLP BNB025LP
 
Kazahaya - REMEMBER HIP HOP 12" BNB047
 
Medusa Edits - REFLECTION SERIES #4 12" ME004
 
Linkwood - PRIME NUMBERS 3 12" PN03
 
Arcadion - FLY VISION 12" DC104
 
Castle Of Freaks - BEEN A LONG TIME 12" WMR004
 
Busta Rhymes Vs J Credible - REMIXES 12" WMR003 
 
Coolhurst - BAMBA GAS COIN 12" NANA001
 
Depeche Mode - WRONG - CASPA RMX 12" 12BONG40
 
Ebony Bones - THE MUZIK 7" SBESTSX72
 
Emperor Machine - KANANANA 12" DC96
 
Evil Nine - ICICLES 12" MAPA049
 
Exile - STAY TUNED EP 12" PLG81
 
Feature Cast - ONE STEP RE-EDIT 7" DP004
 
Friendly Fires - JUMP IN THE POOL RMX 12" XLT439
 
Jazzanova - I CAN SEE (TELEPATICOS) 12" WPBH001
 
Lily Allen - NOT FAIR (PIC DISC) 7" REG153
 
Little Dragon - TWICE REMIX EP 12" PFG123
 
Parallels - ULTRALIGHT EP 12" TINAE017
 
Phoenix - LISTZOMANIA 12" VVR703076
 
TV On The Radio - DANCING CHOOSE RMXS 12" BAD2837
 
Telonius - LIKE WHAT (GLIMMERS RMX) 12" GOMMADT001
 
Various - KUNG FU SUPER SOUNDS LP DWVR002
 
Acid Circus - V SNARES 12” TTT23

New Theme Park Opens in China

Posted by Whitmore, May 17, 2009 08:59am | Post a Comment

What happens in Chongqing stays in Chongqing.
 
I can’t imagine this ever happening here in the states, but China is building what is billed as its first sexually explicit theme park, aimed at providing for its visitors better sex education, sexual technique workshops and demonstrations of safe-sex methods.
 
Due to open in the south-western China in the mega-metropolis of Chongqing this coming October, Love Land includes displays of giant genitalia, nude bodies and features an exhibition on the history of sex and sexual practices in other countries as well as a display on how to use condoms properly.
 
At the main entrance is a sign bearing the park's name straddled between a giant pair of women's legs topped by a red thong. The park’s manager, Lu Xiaoqing, was inspired by a similar sex themed park in Jeju, South Korea that is enjoying huge success. Lu Xiaoqing says that Love Land is not only about educating the public but will help adults enjoy a harmonious sex life.
 
Earlier this year, the Chinese government launched a national sex education campaign aimed at breaking taboos, getting more people to seek treatment for sexually transmitted infections and seeking solutions for infertility problems.
 
Since the 1980s sexual attitudes have changed dramatically in China. One research project shows that in Beijing the percentage of people having premarital sex rose from under 16% in 1989 to over 60% in 2004.

70mm

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 16, 2009 12:45pm | Post a Comment
Having missed the Egyptian's 70mm presentation of both 2001 and Vertigo last week, I'm going to make the trek out to the Aero on the 23rd to catch Vertigo. My last vacation to San Francisco was heavily influenced by the film; we checked out a few of the landmarks that pop up throughout the winding plot. Anyhow, back to 70mm: A few years back I took my son to a Sleeping Beauty 70mm screening and was blown away. During the 80's I caught quite a few of the major blockbusters (E.T., Raiders, Return of the Jedi etc.) but I most remember the Cinema 21 showing of Lawrence of Arabia back in '89. I remember it was '89 because they played "So Alive" by Love and Rockets during the intermission and I hate that song. Even at 14 I could appreciate what the 70mm projection did for Lawrence of Arabia and I'm sure you'll agree if you too choose to run out to Santa Monica next weekend and catch the sceening of either Lawrence or the Hitchcock classic. While you're at it, tomorrow night they're showing an amazing Noir double as part of their Jules Dassin tribute-- Thieves' Highway and Night and the City!





Remembering Andy Kaufman

Posted by Whitmore, May 16, 2009 11:51am | Post a Comment

Hugh Van Es 1941 - 2009

Posted by Whitmore, May 16, 2009 11:15am | Post a Comment
Hugh Van Es, a Dutch photojournalist who covered the Vietnam War, capturing some of the most enduring images of the era, has died. Last week he suffered a brain hemorrhage and never regained consciousness. He died on Friday at the Queen Mary Hospital in Hong Kong. Van Es was 67.

One of his most famous photos is that of the fall of Saigon in 1975, showing evacuees scaling a ladder onto a helicopter from a rooftop. The image, in no subtle way, became a metaphor for the United States’ profound policy failures in Vietnam.

Van Es arrived in Hong Kong as a freelance photographer in 1967, joining the South China Morning Post. After a stretch as a photographer for the Associated Press from 1969 to 1972, he covered the last three years of the Vietnam war for United Press International. His first celebrated photo was of a wounded soldier with a tiny cross gleaming against his dark silhouette taken in May of 1969 during the battle of Hamburger Hill.
 
But Van Es’ most lasting image was taken on the final day of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam on April 29, 1975. Van Es was in the Saigon UPI bureau offices when he saw a few dozen Americans climbing a ladder trying to board  one of the CIA’s own Air American helicopters on a rooftop just a few blocks away at 22 Gia Long Street, which sat about a half a mile from the embassy. From his vantage point on the UPI balcony, Van Es captured the scene with a 300mm lens, the longest one he had. The building in the picture was an apartment that housed C.I.A. officials and families and not Saigon’s American Embassy as has been erroneously believed over the years.

This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, May 16, 2009 02:45am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

The May / June Calendar is NOW online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm

Printed calendars are at the theater - be sure to pick one up for yourself and a few for your friends!


Friday, Saturday & Sunday May 15, 16 & 17



The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0043456/
dir. Robert Wise, starring Michael Rennie, Patricia Neal, Hugh Marlowe, Sam Jaffe, Billy Gray, Frances Bavier, Lock Martin
featuring a legendary score by Bernard Herrmann 
Fri: 7:30; Sat & Sun: 3:55 & 7:30

The Day The Earth Stood Still was added to the National Film Registry in 1995.

plus a

Feature Length Sci-Fi Trailer Show!
Fri: 9:25; Sat & Sun: 5:50 & 9:25


Friday May 15

Like, Omigod! I Might Actually Enjoy 80s Music...

Posted by Miss Ess, May 15, 2009 06:23pm | Post a Comment
Going on a road trip any time soon? Looking for the perfect soundtrack to capture the giddy spontaneity of the road? May I suggest taking along epic 80s boxset Like, Omigod! The 80s Pop Culture Box as a way to bring the good times?

like omigod

I'm just starting to get comfortable with being an actual fan of 80s music. (Brad will be proud!) My pac man feverboyfriend, on the other hand, is well beyond the comfort level with his fandom, and is completely into rehashing every last radio hit from that era. In the past, this would have been met with little more than a blank stare from me; when he put this 7-cd box set collection on in our car, I admit I braced myself for impact, but turns out it was more entertaining and silly, more of a conversation-starter, even, than anything bonnie tylerelse we could have spent hours listening to in close quarters.

Track after track brought either squeals of recognition and memories, like Frank Zappa's "Valley Girl" and my total fave, Bonnie Tyler's "Total Eclipse of the Heart," or was met with a vacant look by me and incredulous gasps by my partner in crime, who couldn't get over the fact that I had never heard "Pac Man Fever" by Buckner & Garcia or "The Look of Love" by ABC. What can I say? My parents sheltered me back in the 80s! While I of course appreciate gems like Prince and The Replacements, I've spent the last few years even further deprogramming myself and very slowly coming to terms with the fact that musically the 80s weren't complete and utter trash. Nostalgia aside, based on the tracks I had never heard before, this box set goes a ways in proving that singles from the 80s work hard and succeed at providing something pop music nowadays is sorely lacking: fun...which is exactly what you need when you are endlessly stuck in a two door car in the middle of nowhere!

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 05:15:09

Posted by Billyjam, May 15, 2009 09:14am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music San Francisco Hip-Hop Top Five: 05:15:09
ftc face to face
1) TD Camp Face To Face (Hella Records)

2) Tanya Morgan Brooklynati (Interdependent Media)

3) Cam'ron Crime Pays
(Diplomat Records/Asylum Records)

4) The Grouch & Eligh Say G&E! (Legendary Music)

5) Themselves freeHOUDINIdeluxe (Anticon)

The number one album at Amoeba Music San Francisco this week is Face To Face from the longtime SF DJ/producer/engineer and head of Hella Records, TD Camp. Many may know TD Camp for his work with Bored Stiff, Co-Deez, Equipto, Zumbi of Zion I, and other artists. This anticipated 17 track CD on Hella Records, which is presented by FTC, the skateboarding company, features hella guests, mostly hometown or Bay Area artists the producer has built up a relationship with in his years in the rap game since the early nineties. Guests include: Andre Nickatina, Goapele, San Quinn, Zion I, Casual, Pep Love, DJ Qbert, Mike Marshall, JT the Bigga Figga, Bored Stiff, Z-Man, Big Mack, Willie Hen, Otayo Dubb, Spank Pops, Rick Flare, Schwinn, Akil, Bailey, Big Rich, Rosco Feddi, Philthy Rich, PZ, and Jay Anthony. Also included on Face to Face are SoCal's legendary Snoop Dogg and the late great Vallejo rap artist Mac Dre.

WHEN MUSIC IS USED TO CAUSE PAIN AND HUMAN SUFFERING

Posted by Billyjam, May 14, 2009 02:39pm | Post a Comment

Traditionally thought of as soothing and relaxing, or at least pleasurable in some way to the subjective listener, music can also be the cause of pain and suffering.

You have probably heard that classical and other music is sometimes used to disperse loitering adolescents at malls, as in the case in New Zealand a couple of months ago when Barry Manilow songs were blasted to alienate and drive away unwanted teens. But that is nothing compared to the US armed forces' use of music as a form of torture against detainees in US operated detention centers in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantanamo Bay. It has been reported by journalists and human rights advocates that the music of such artists as Eminem, Nine Inch Nails, Queen, Rage Against the Machine, Britney Spears, and even Barney and Sesame Street tunes have been blasted at deafeningly high decibels as a means of physical torture in interrogation at these centers.

Not surprisingly, word of these tactics has shocked many, including the artists whose music was unknowingly appropriated, and has resulted in the formation of an organization, UK non-profit group Reprieve, to protest the use of music as torture and to make sure it never happens again. Reprieve is supportive of the anti-torture initiative called Zero dB that is hoping to bring an end to the technique by gathering the support of musicians whose songs are used in controversial interrogation techniques by US forces. So far they have gotten overwhelming support from outraged artists including Tom Morello of Rage Against The Machine and Lars Ulrich of Metallica who was interviewed recently on the topic by Rachel Maddow on MSNBC. Sesame Street composer Christopher Cerf's reaction is captured in the video news report below, courtesy of AP, that also includes an interview with former detainee Donald Vance.

Jon Moritsugu - Original BB in da house

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 14, 2009 02:38pm | Post a Comment

Jon Moritsugu and Amy Davis

Jon Moritsugu
is an American filmmaker who's enjoyed a long career of critical acclaim and underground fandom. Many of his films feature actress/wife/Scumrock co-writer/sometime bandmate Amy Davis. Although best known for his cult classic Mod Fuck Explosion, he's consistently and constantly made films that challenge and entertain with his unique style. As part of a series of interviews with groundbreaking Asian-Americans in the entertainment industry, he graciously agreed to be interviewed.

Eric Brightwell: Since it’s Asian/Pacific Island American Heritage Month, I’ll start with some questions related to that. First of all, how’s your APAH Month so far? Does it mean anything to you?

 
nori in its green glory                                                             "wok on over" and "taste the joy"... I don't get it!

Jon Moritsugu: APAH?... Ah... I did eat a buncha nori my mommy sent me... I think every day should be a day of awareness, be it racial, cultural, environmental or personal. No, but I digress...to me APAH is two for one Panda Express for me and the lady.

EB: It seems like in the past two decades, there’s been a fairly healthy explosion in the number of Asian American movies (albeit mostly within the indie sector). With the diversification within the works of Asian-American filmmakers, do people still tag you with the “bad boys” thing? Who were the “good boys of Asian American Cinema?” Wanye Wang and Peter Wang? What do you think about the current state of Asian American film?

SEVEN MOMENTS IN 45 YEARS OF IRISH SOUL

Posted by Billyjam, May 14, 2009 12:07pm | Post a Comment
                                                                Laura Izibor "Shine"  (2009)

 Padraig Rushe "Gonna Be A Change" (2008)

Republic of Loose "I Like Music" (2008)

Them feat. Van Morrison "Mystic Eyes" + "Gloria" (live on French TV circa '64)

Taste feat. Rory Gallagher "Sugar Mama" (live @ Bilzen Jazz Festival) (1969)

Hothouse Flowers "I'm Sorry" (live) (1988)

Mt Egypt Interview - His New Album III Is Out Now

Posted by Miss Ess, May 13, 2009 04:58pm | Post a Comment
Travis Graves is the one and only member of the musical act known as Mt. Egypt. His latest album, III, is out now on vinyl only from Secret Seven Records and available at Amoeba. Airy, cyclical and sweet, nature seems to surround the album. Its acoustic songs are confessional and simultaneously sunny- sounding. The record kinda makes me want to go to the beach but maybe for a good cry down near the crashing surf. Mt. Egypt's music has beautiful harmonies and gorgeous moments of sonic intensity. This all seems strange perhaps, coming from a formerly sponsored skateboarder who mostly listens to hip hop, but welcome to the enigma that is Mt. Egypt -- read on for more about what makes Travis tick, how his new record III came to be and also his brushes with greatness, including tours with Flaming Lips, Willie Nelson, Cat Power and even...The Osbournes!

mt egypt iii
Album artwork by Justin Limoges

Where does the name Mt Egypt come from?

Travis: The name Mt. Egypt came from an area in rural North Carolina out by my famt egyptther’s house. It’s an homage to him, his songwriting and to spending long periods in the wilderness with little to no human contact.

When did you pick up the guitar?

Travis: My old man got me playing guitar when I was 12 or 13.

How did you start writing songs?

New Beverly Midnights: THE CAR Friday / FREAKED Saturday

Posted by phil blankenship, May 13, 2009 11:21am | Post a Comment
Ryan Rotten and Phil Blankenship proudly present MIDNIGHT SHOCK!
www.shocktillyoudrop.com


Friday May 15

James Brolin vs.


THE CAR

There's nowhere to run, nowhere to hide, no way to stop... THE CAR

New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7



Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!



Saturday May 9

FREAKED

EXTREMELY RARE 35mm Print!

Alex Winter & Tom Stern IN PERSON, schedule permitting!


New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
11:59pm, All Tickets $7



Humboldt County's Potluck Use Weed As A Gateway Message

Posted by Billyjam, May 12, 2009 10:30pm | Post a Comment

Humboldt County's Potluck may have spent the last decade building a rap rep closely associated with their Northern California home county's best known export, but below the surface of this talented, hard-working, hip-hop duo is a lot more than blunts and weed smoke, insists member UnderRated.

"Our first message might appear to be the weed because we are from Humboldt and our name is Potluck," said the rapper/producer backstage at BB Kings in NYC recently as part of the North American End of Days tour with Twiztid, Boondox, and Prozak. "But what we really try to do is spread a message of peace and to show that everyone can get along for real." Proof lies, he says, in the fact that a comparatively small Jewish white guy born in the small town NorCal Humboldt area and his partner in rhyme, the SoCal born African American 1 Ton, who lives up to his name, can get along so well. "We are totally different people but we get along great. We have learned from each other, coming up from completely different backgrounds. He's not from Humboldt. He's from San Diego. So he came up north and learned a different way...a Humboldt way, which is laid back, cool, you know be cool to everybody. And then I learned from him like this world ain't all cool and easy."potluck

Further proving that Potluck is a lot more than just stoner-anthem makers, are several fantastic songs on the new album Pipe Dreams like "Computer Love," a hilarious commentary about the perils of online romantic connections, and the serious, heartfelt "My Dad," which is an ode to the pair's respective fathers. "That's really a very personal song to both of us," said 1 Ton. "You see, my father is really sick right now, so that is why I start my verse with 'Some thoughts that you deserve to hear before you pass away,' because a lot of the reason why I am who I am is because of him. So it's like a tribute song but in the same way a celebration of the relationship we have. I just hope that now with my kids that I can have the same relationship."
 
The two members of Potluck, neither of whom were rappers to begin with, first met at a DJ audition. "We both started out as DJ's," recalled emcee 1 Ton, who, despite his intimidating Suge Knight-like presence, is nothing like the Death Row figure. "We met at a DJ trial for a club and we started DJ'ing [together], four turntables, ya know, rockin' underground house parties and all that stuff and we started making beats. And then reluctantly at the very end we started rhyming, you know just due to potluckpeople flaking and not coming over to rap and stuff like that. So then it just kinda snowballed into what it is today. But we reluctantly got into rap." That was a decade ago. Since then, the pair have worked hard at honing their craft and equally as hard at building their careers, mostly through tireless networking wherever a door opened for them. All of their hard work has paid off.

Ce n'est pas un commercial

Posted by Job O Brother, May 12, 2009 04:46pm | Post a Comment
hedda lettuce


Friends!
Romans!
Countrymen!
Everyone else not covered by the above catagories!


I've just been notified that my dear friend Hedda Lettuce is currently angling for a spot on Logo's hit reality TV show RuPaul's Drag Race.

You may remember Hedda from Season 5 of Project Runway when she had the misfortune to work with fashion no-no Suede.

Do humanity a favor, won't you, and take a couple seconds to vote for her? Thanks!

(In which we bric some brac and knick some knack.)

Posted by Job O Brother, May 11, 2009 05:46pm | Post a Comment
severed heads in boxes
As God is my witness, I don't know what I'm supposed to pack my collection of vintage boxes in.


Phew! Hey – how’s it going? Oh, you’re reading the Amoeblog, I see. Well, hope I’m not interrupting you – I just needed to take a break from unpacking. I don’t know how I fit so much stuff into my previous, tiny, New York-style apartment! I mean, I don’t remember sleeping on a pile of books and LP’s eight yards deep, but I must have.

The whole process of moving can be especially complicated for those of us who are avid collectors of music and film and all manner of art-faggory. It becomes a reenactment of that crucial scene from Sophie’s Choice (I won’t include any spoilers here for those of you who’ve never seen the film; suffice it to say that, due to Sophie’s fear of baking soda, her love for the town’s baker suffers some dire tragedies. And her cat turns out to be the murderer.)

I find myself reconsidering whether or not I need a collection of punk 45’s, but before I can decide, I’m distracted by the hilarity and exuberance of the Blatz song then suddenly stuck in my head, and before I know it, everything’s in the box “to be saved” and all that makes it to the thrift store is a redundant garlic press and a cutting board whose origin I cannot recall.
astronomy
I suppose I could live without my antique sextant. But what if I wanna measure the altitude of a
celestial object above the horizon while onboard a ship without electricity? ...I better keep it.

To be honest, I never really identified with the “collector” mentality. I have this many albums because I love this many (and more) and I have these DVD’s, books and posters for the same reason. I don’t keep hold of anything simply because of its cash value. I never questioned what I could sell my autographed, first pressing of Stories From the Nerve Bible for on Craig’s List – I just wanna read it again and again, ‘s all.

EVIDENTLY JOHN COOPER CLARKE - THE BARD OF SALFORD

Posted by Billyjam, May 11, 2009 03:24pm | Post a Comment
In addition to the whole DIY ethic that was instilled, another great gift of both the punk rock movement and the post-punk movement that immediately followed it was how they each helped open people up to embracing a really wide & diverse range of music by artists doing anything from punk derived guitar music to varying styles of electronic, industrial, dub, roots reggae, world, and spoken word, etc. And of the spoken word artists, none matched the brilliant "bard of Salford," punk poet John Cooper Clarke, whose satirical & witty run on rants easily match any of the best hip-hop emcees.

John Cooper Clarke (JCC), who looked a lot like Dylan circa Blonde On Blonde when he first came to fame in the late seventies, hailed from Salford, Greater Manchester, the same area that Joy Division came from -- a group with whom he will forever be associated. As well as opening for such acts as the Sex Pistols, The Fall, The Buzzcocks, and Elvis Costello, JCC also opened for Joy Division. In fact, in one memorable moment from the 2007 Joy Division biopic Control, the artist convincingly recreates, 30 full years later, a performance from a 1977 Joy Division concert where he supported the group. 

Additionally, he can be seen performing his best known poem, "Evidently Chickentown," at the start and end of the video for Joy Division's live performance of "Transmission" (clip below), which features JCC reading the refrain and third verses. And even after Ian Curtis' suicide, when the band morphed into New Order, he continued to open for them, even in 1984 at a Music for Miners benefit at London's Royal Festival Hall.

Truly a poet of the people, his engaging everyman tales, delivered typically as witty, scathing satirical takes on every day, humorously tackled topics such as the British working class's favorite package holiday destination ("Majorca") to people's obsession with health and fitness ("Health Fanatic" + "Bronze Adonis"). "(I Married a) Monster from Outer Space" was as much an absurdist tale as a clever commentary on racism. His poem "The Pest," in which every other word began with the letter P, proved his masterful control of the English language. While he sometimes performed with music accompaniment backing from The Invisible Girls (Pete Shelly was a member), his poetry was at its best when at its rawest: delivered a cappella in a live, rowdy punk club setting. 

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 05/16/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 11, 2009 03:09pm | Post a Comment


New Electro/Techno 12"s Coming this Weekend:

Linkwood Family - MILES AWAY DUBS 12" FIREC005
INTRUSION DUBS pressed on ultra heavyweight white vinyl. Limited pressing of 1000 copies each hand stamped by the label with each sleeve done with a special screen printing process. This is STEVE HITCHELL aka INTRUSTION aka CV313 aka SOULTEK and one half of ECHOSPACE. Do not sleep!!
 
Jon Hopkins - LIGHT THROUGH THE VEINS 12" DS014
Sit down and listen to this. Classic, hypnotic, spacey electronica with a beauty and sadness to it. EWAN PEARSON delivers a 15 minute future Balearic classic and DAVID HOLMES keeps it simple and euphoric, with a slight indie meets cosmic feel.
 
Beatfanatic - AUTOMATIC 12" SCR016
 
Francisco Mora Catlett - BABA LU AYE 12" PC12002
 
Nickodemus - SUN CHILDREN EP 12" ESL152
 
Federico Aubele - LA ESQUINA & CORAZON 12" ESL126
 
Federico Aubele - MARIA JOSE 12" ESL127
 
Annie - ANTHONIO (FRED FALKE REMIX) 12" ITEM1
 
Embassy - State 08 12" ADV003
 
Golden Bug - BARBIE'S BACK REMIXES 12" SSG003
 
Hexadecimal - SECRET AGENT EP 12" DISNT184
 
Kraftwerk - ULTRA RARE TRAXX 1 DLP KFT001
 
MGMT - KIDS (SOULWAX REMIX) 12" 88697412831
 
Metronomy - RADIO LADIO REMIX 12" BEC5772480
 
Maetrik - SPACE CHRONIC EP 12" MSHIP008
 
Nice Up! - DARE MAN & SHOW ME DUB 7" NICEUP007
 
Trackademics - ENJOY WHAT YOU DO 12" FGR016
 
Various - FOOL'S GOLD REMIXED 12" FGRRMX
 
Various - WIREBLOCK 002 12" WB002
 
Roxy Music - AVALON 12”  ROXYMISC.

Memorial for John Leech

Posted by Whitmore, May 10, 2009 10:47am | Post a Comment

MOTHER: 2PAC, JOHN LENNON, SINEAD O' CONNOR & ROGER WATERS

Posted by Billyjam, May 10, 2009 08:40am | Post a Comment

2Pac - "Dear Mama"


John Lennon performing "Mother" live at Madison Square Garden


Roger Waters & Sinead O' Connor "Mother" (The Wall Live in Berlin concert)


The Pharcyde "Ya Mama"

The End Or A New Beginning For Fania...

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 10, 2009 01:40am | Post a Comment

I should have been clued in when Fania Records promised to be a sponsor for a club called Anda! that I do with fellow deejays Gazooo, Ray Ricky Rivera and Mando Fever. The folks at Fania suddenly backed out on their sponsorship for no apparent reason other than to say that there were going to be "changes in the company." Then I read this today: according to an announcement made on Decarga.com, Emusica, who had purchased Fania in 2005, has sold Fania to Signal-Equity, a company that, according to their website, specializes in “leveraged buy-outs, roll-ups, restructurings and secondary purchases of investment portfolios in the media and technology sectors.”

Also according to Descarga.com, it seems that Signal-Equity intends to be respectful of the catalog and “appears to be committed to doing the right thing with this historically significant material.” Formal announcements and future release dates are planned for late summer or early fall.

What does this mean for the fans of Fania Music? Signal-Equity seems like it’s one of those companies that takes failing businesses and turns them around for a profit. The best-case scenario is that Signal-Equity will improve upon what Emusica has started with the catalog. Emusica did a great job reissuing and re-mastering the classic titles that have been out of print for decades. However, my criticism is that there were way too many compilations, including ones aimed at people new to Fania Records that neither appealed to new fans nor Fania enthusiasts. Also, there were way too many “Greatest Hits” packages, many from the same artists. Currently, there are five different Willie Colon, Hector Lavoe and Celia Cruz “collections,” most of which contain the same songs. Perhaps Signal-Equity will focus on the many titles that were still in the Fania vaults rather than barrage their customers with endless greatest hits packages?

This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, May 9, 2009 05:16pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

The May / June Calendar is NOW online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm

Printed calendars are at the theater - be sure to pick one up for yourself and a few for your friends!


Friday & Saturday May 8 & 9


Gloria Swanson and Erich von Stroheim

Sunset Blvd. (1950)
Winner of 3 Academy Awards, Nominated for 8 Others!
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0043014/
dir. Billy Wilder, starring Gloria Swanson, William Holden, Erich von Stroheim, Nancy Olson, Fred Clark
Fri: 7:30; Sat: 3:20 & 7:30, Watch The Trailer!

Queen Kelly (1929)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0020298/
dir. Erich von Stroheim, starring Gloria Swanson, Walter Byron
Fri: 9:40; Sat: 5:30 & 9:40

Emily Ryan of Emily's Sassy Lime

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 9, 2009 10:39am | Post a Comment

Emily Ryan
is an artist/actress/DJ/musician who, in 1994, formed possibly the first all female Asian American rock group, Emily's Sassy Lime, with sisters Amy and Wendy Yao. In 2002, she played James Duval's girlfriend in Jon Moritsugu's underground classic Scumrock.

Eric Brightwell: Question 1: what other all Asian-American rock bands were there before Emily's Sassy Lime?
 
Emily Ryan: J Church, Seam, aMiniature, Slint… I suggest you peep the (seminal) Ear of the Dragon comp… Versus… no all girl ones however! They would sprinkle in one here or there…Skankin’ Pickle.

EB: I had no idea that half of those bands were comprised of Asians! They weren't really getting a lot of play on Friday Night Videos.

ER: Exactly. I’ll correct myself; those groups were LED by Asian Americans… as in "not just the bassist.” I want to say that I recently met the drummer from an old Matador band, Chavez – James Lo...Tae from Kicking Giant...Steve Gamboa from Nation of Ulysses, Cupid Car Club, and Make-Up.

Giant Tarantulas Attack!

Posted by Whitmore, May 8, 2009 07:40pm | Post a Comment
Australia is someplace I will probably never visit, and that goes double for Australia’s Outback. The main and personally terrifying raison d'être is the Down Under’s world renowned collection of weird, poisonous, larger than friggin’ life creepy crawlies lurking in every shrub, behind every rock, and under every toilet seat.
And a new story in Times of London isn’t helping my arachnophobia, ophidiophobia, or even my entomophobia.
 
Scores of eastern tarantulas, that can grow larger than the palm of a man’s hand, also known as “bird-eating spiders” or “whistling spiders” because of the noise they make when disturbed or aggravated at close range, have begun crawling out from their netherworld lairs and are now invading the coastal town of Bowen, about 700 miles northwest of Brisbane. Even long time, hard core outback residents have gotten the willies.
 
Earlier this week a tarantula the size of an SUV was spotted wandering towards a public garden in the center of town. Alarmed residents called in the Amalgamated Pest Control but not before using a full can of insect repellent spray to stymie the spider's approach.
 
According to Audy Geiszler, the hero in this tale who runs Amalgamated Pest Control, he has been inundated with calls from wigged out locals. "There have been a number of reports. It's not plague proportions but a number have been spotted around the district.”
 
Not plague proportions … yet!
 
One spider was so large that when he placed it in the palm of his hand -- dead of course -- its legs hung over his fingers. Common in eastern Australia where they usually live under logs and in naturally rocky outcrops, these giant tarantulas seem to have been pushed out from their usual habitats by the recent unseasonably heavy rains.
 
While not deadly like many other Australian spiders, these tarantulas are still venomous; their bite can pack quite a punch. They can grow up to, and obviously beyond, 6cm (2.4in) long with a leg span of 16cm (6.3in). By the way, despite being called “bird-eating spiders,” they do not eat birds, but can kill a dog or cat with one quick bite.

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 05:08:09

Posted by Billyjam, May 8, 2009 07:07am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Berkeley Hip-Hop Top Five: 05:08:09
grouch and eligh
1) The Grouch & Eligh Go G+E! (Legendary)

2) Mr. Lif I Heard It Today (Bloodbot/Traffic Ent) 

3) DOOM Born Like This (Lex)

4) Rick Ross Deeper Than Rap (Maybach/Poe Boy/Def Jam)

5) Q-Tip The Renaissance (Universal/Motown)

For the third week in a row the Living Legends duo of The Grouch & Eligh are number one at Amoeba Music. The pair's third collaborative album, Say G&E! (Legendary Music), is the number one best selling new hip-hop album this week at Amoeba Berkeley, and has been on top since last week at Amoeba Hollywood and for two weeks already at Amoeba San Francisco (where they also performed last week). And what a diverse hip-hop album it is, with numerous guest contributors including Flying Lotus (who produced "Old Souls"), Mistah F.A.B. (who sounds unlike his usual self on the song "Comin' Up"), Gift of Gab and Pigeon John (who guest on the alt-rock sounding "All In"), and Slug of Atmosphere (who appears on the very Bay sounding, AmpLive-produced riding track "BOOM!").

out this week 5/5...akron/family...esser...isis...magik markers...mika miko...st. vincent...peaches...

Posted by Brad Schelden, May 7, 2009 12:35pm | Post a Comment
star trek
I think I am sometimes easily persuaded by advertising...but I like to think of myself as a pretty strong person. I usually turn off my brain during commercials or at least think of other things while they are on... and these days I usually just fast forward through them! I try to ignore billboards, and while I might look at ads in magazines, I don't usually pay attention to what they are advertising. But I most certainly have nothing short of Star Trek fever. I think sometimes advertising and promotion is just right and my mind is already open to the idea. Sometimes, like this time, I just can't resist, even though I have never been a huge Star Trek fan. I have always loved science fiction and did watch the first couple of Star Trek movies, but I never made it past the fourth movie, which came out in 1986. I might have to venture back and watch them all over again. Maybe I will make it up to the fifth one this time. It does sound a bit interesting, if not a bit absurd as well-- Spock's half brother kidnaps the Enterprise to go on a search for God! Sounds a bit like a big budget, sci fi soap opera plot. I think the time is just right for this film. We were all horribly let down by the three prequel Star Wstar trek zachary quintoars movies. We grew up loving those movies and I sort of had a little bit of hope at the time, but they were just not good, as much as I tried to like them. I have much higher hopes for this new Star Trek. Let's just hope there is no Jar Jar Binks in the new Star Trek. The Star Trek movie is really more of a reinvention than the Star Wars movies ever were-- George Lucas would never let that kind of reinvention happen, but it would still be interesting to give the Star Wars franchise over to someone like Quentin Tarantino or Danny Boyle just to see how it could be revinvented. Maybe Robert Rodriquez and Quentin could codirect it. It would be interesting at least! J.J. Abrams seems like a great director for this new set of films, and the cast seems perfect: choosing Zachary Quinto as Spock and Simon Pegg as Scotty is just brilliant. I also think Winona Ryder as Spock's mother is perfect casting. Enough about Star Trek! It doesn't really need any more promotion! I am just excited. I couldn't get my favorite seat at the Arclight Dome until next Monday, and I was also not so sure I wanted to see the movie with all the crazy super fans on the first weekend -- although maybe I will be missing out on some great costumes in the audience.
peaches
Anyway, I really thought I had gotten over Peaches. I was a huge fan of her first album-- I just couldn't get enough of The Teaches of Peaches. She had recorded an album before that one, but 2000 was the year the first real Peaches album came out. It was the year she made her way into San Francisco, into my small little world and she seemed to sort of take it over and reinvent a whole new sort of music. She made dance music fun again and made pop music more interesting. Her shows were amazing and out of control. I know there are Peaches haters out there, but you really can't really understand what she is all about until you see her live. Seeing her perform with John Waters in Los Angeles many years ago was the perfect lineup for her. It just made sense. As much as I loved her and listened to this first record, I sort of started to lose interest over the last couple of years. Was I now a bit to old to listen to Peaches? Was she too old to be Peaches? The new album is out this week and is called I Feel Cream. It will manage to offend just as many people as the other albums have, but it should also please all her old fans. She even manages to sing on the album. The song I keep going back to is "Lose You" -- mostly because I can't even believe it is her. It is a song that could easily end up on a Kylie Minogue of Royksopp album, but it is peaches i feel creamPeaches and she actually has a good voice. I also love the song "Mud." "Mommy Complex" and "Trick or Treat" are also fantastic songs on the album. I can't really imagine anyone but Peaches being able to pull these songs off. There is really nobody like her and nobody else should even try to be. Peaches is Peaches, and I am happy to know that she is still in my life. I don't know if I will still be listening to her in 10 years, but I imagine she will have reinvented herself by then. Maybe she will start doing modern opera or some classic bluegrass. I would really love for her to reinvent every genre. She could do a fantastic comedy album. I could also imagine her putting together a really good blues album. But I do know one thing for sure: in 10 or 20 years Peaches will be performing showtunes in Vegas. And I will most certainly make the drive out there for that one! She will never be as big as Cher or Bette Midler, but it sure would be fun to see her perform in some big Vegas production! A Peaches Cirque Du Soleil would mosty certainly be fantastic and amazing. Somebody please steal my idea! Peaches in a sort of animal revue would also work. We do need another Siegfried & Roy! Can't you just imagine Peaches and her lesbian assistant performing on a Vegas stage with some wild birds and monkeys?
esser
My new favorite album of the week is most definitely the debut album from Esser. Ben Esser is most certainly from England -- that much is obvious early on in the album. My first thought when I heard this record was Patrick Wolf. They have a similar style and both seem to play all their own instruments and record albums in their bedrooms. They both also have that young, early 20's energy that is hard to capture once you are beyond your early 20's. This excellent album is called Braveface. Equal parts Blur and Lilly Allen, plus Patrick Wolf singing with the Ordinary Boys. His lyrics are not as magical and ethereal as Wolf's though. They are more rooted in the angst of new relationships and love. The best song onben esser the album comes at the very end, so make sure you make it all the way to track 10, "Stop Dancing." It is the song that you will keep coming back to. The whole album is less than 40 minutes long, so it doesn't take you long to get there and you also have fantastic, perfect pop songs like "Headlock," "Bones," and "I Love You." The album is not replacing my favorite of last week though! I still love that Thieves Like Us album more than anything, but this Esser album comes in close second. Pop music is usually so horrible -- it is nice to find a great little pop album every once in a while. They mostly all seem to come from England. But I guess that is just my taste in pop music! I am already looking forward to his next album. He may have not even written the songs yet but I can already imagine it in my head. I am gonna go back and listen to "Stop Dancing" again, probably a couple of times. I love it. Thank you, Ben Esser for sharing your album with us. It is just what I needed to start my summer.

WHO NEEDS A DRUMMER WHEN...

Posted by Billyjam, May 7, 2009 04:27am | Post a Comment



Who needs a drummer in the band when you have a reliable idling tractor that keeps time perfectly? In the recent YouTube posting above from member Fschnell in Hungary, his band features the two cylinder diesel engine percussion sounds, which round out their live rendition of "Sweet Georgia Brown," the jazz standard/bygone pop tune whose music was written by Ben Bernie & Maceo Pinkard in 1925. File under jazz standards or industrial!

What's In My Bag? w/ Camilo Lara of M.I.S.

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 6, 2009 06:46pm | Post a Comment

Lately I have been doing interviews for the Amoeba website, mostly for the "What's In My Bag?" section. In the last few weeks, I have interviewed Camilo Lara from Mexican Institute Of Sound, members of Zoe, and Gil Cerezo of Kinky & Chico Sonido. I have enjoyed talking to different musicians about what they are listening to these days. My conversation with Camilo Lara lasted beyond the time we interviewed him for the segment. We discussed the future of music and how the internet has leveled the playing field, which is great for indie bands from Mexico. We discussed his audience in the U.S., who he describes as "mostly Anglos who listen to music on NPR or public radio, world music enthusiasts and Mexican nationalists who check out every band from Mexico..." Finally, we discussed his somewhat unusual day job as the Chairman of E.M.I. Mexico. He once dropped the band Zoe from Sony after their first record didn't do so well, only to resign them once they became bigger as an indie band. Sometimes you are just too ahead of the curve.

I found him to be an interesting person and quite knowledgeable about music in general. Check out my segment with Camilo below:

Mick Fleetwood's Autobiography: Fleetwood - My Life and Adventures with Fleetwood Mac

Posted by Miss Ess, May 6, 2009 04:48pm | Post a Comment
Ever since I wrote this post a few months ago, it's been a full on Mac attack in my life -- I have been listening non-stop to Fleetwood Mac's Tusk, everywhere I go, over and over. I picked up Mick Fleetwood's 1991 autobiography as well, Fleetwood - My Life and Adventures with Fleetwood Mac, hoping for some salicious tidbits about the band that is known not only for its instantly addicting, mega-popular music, but also for the many interband rumours...

mick fleetwood autobiography

The book is pretty great. Mick describes his childhood and early life with candor, including his stints in boarding school and his feeling that he was not smart, upheld by his poor academic performances and difficulty memorizing facts...thus, he turned to music, and with perfect timing. Although he certainly slaved away upon moving to London, paying his dues in one dank club after another, he makes the process of gaining early fame and fortune seem somewhat simple -- after all, this was Swinging London! He was in mick fleetwoodthe right place at the exact right time to make a career for himself.

Mick portrays himself as the glue that held the various incarnations of the band together over the years, and it appears to be true -- he and a rather mute John McVie are the only two members that have stuck with the band since its creation in the mid 60s. Mick felt he had no back up career; holding the band together was what he pledged his whole heart to, even at the expense of his first marriage, relationships and children.

New Electronic CD Releases 5/06/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 6, 2009 04:04pm | Post a Comment
Few highlights from this weeks new CD releases. The Prins Thomas live mix CD is the best mix I've heard in months!  - Oliver
Prins Thomas
Prins Thomas
Live At Robert Johnson Vol. 2 (CD)
(PLAY)

This is the second volume in a 4-part CD compilation series celebrating the 10th anniversary of Frankfurt's Robert Johnson club. Volume 2 has been selected and mixed by one of Norway's best: Full Pupp label head, DJ/producer, and versatile disco Viking, Prins Thomas. In the studio, Thomas sprinkles everything from the Junior Boys and Studio through to Justus Köhncke and techno classics on R&S Records with his lively drum-bass-organ magic. As a DJ, he works his sets from front to back, from loud to quiet, and from one genre to the next, through all various shades of grey in between. This is probably the only CD in the whole world on which Ricardo Villalobos dances to "Afro Punk Reggae Dub" by Steel An' Skin with his house band Cos/Mes, where a Playhouse classic from Roman Flügel performs an Acid Test in the "Gallery Oslo" by Kåre & The Cavemen, where synth-rock by Trans Am glows like a fixed star, and where Bjørn Torske makes it clear who was the first to polish the Norwegian disco ball (the Idjut Boys claim this title for England). Also on this mix, Closer Musik evokes wistfulness and Sébastien Tellier argues about beard lengths with DJ Harvey of Map Of Africa. Twenty-seven breathtaking gems, some of them affectionately edited by Prins, but always with two hands, a Urei mixing desk, two CD players and turntables, the mischievous Korg Kaoss Pad as well as an in/out insulator, and mixed with that unwavering, killer DJ instinct of his. And of course, everything is done live in one take so as to evoke the feeling of a Viking longboat on a stormy sea. Other artists include: Arpadys, Cage & Aviary, Capracara, Rub N Tug, Trans Am, Babytalk, Frankie Valentine, Isoul8, Low Motion Disco, Still Going, James Yuill, Dogs Of War, Anarchic System, Argy & The Mole, Martin Circus, Opolopo, Domu, Mathew Jonson, Samos, and Lindstrøm.

UH UH UH STICK 'EM: THE FAT BOYS REMEMBERED

Posted by Billyjam, May 6, 2009 12:22pm | Post a Comment
fat boys
Compared to the all too prevalent mean mugging, tough scowling stance of today's typical hip-hop star, the popular 1980's rap group The Fat Boys (Prince Markie Dee, Kool Rock-Ski, Buff Love) were polar opposites with their smiling, all-ages friendly personas (not to mention lyrics) and cuddly, good humored personalities. From right when the NYC trio burst onto the still burgeoning hip-hop scene in 1984, they embodied a wholesome, non-threatening image to accompany their instantly engaging beatbox driven rap style. In fact, the late Buff Love, aka The Human Beatbox, was a hip-hop pioneer in beatboxing along Doug E. Fresh, who simultaneously helped popularize the mouth percussion style unique to the genre.

But barely below the surface there was also a somewhat sinister aspect to the Fat Boys-- they were exploited (or allowed themselves to be) by labels and marketing men who went overboard, playing up their obesity and downplaying the seriousness of not eating healthily. Obesity tragically led to the 1995 heart attack death of Buff Love/The Human Beatbox at age 28, by then reportedly weighing 450 lbs. Below are a selection of videos from the 80's that in a way tell the Fat Boys story, displaying the marketing of the group. Included are the videos "Jailhouse Rap" and "Stick Em" from their 1984 self-titled debut on Sutra Records, an album whose cover picture (above) showed them stuffing down pizza and ice cream. This food-gorging image was only further enforced in such videos as "All You Can Eat" from the 1987 film Krush Groove and their appearance on Square One TV eating too many burgers. Also below is the group's cameo in Miami Vice when they were not eating, but instead were portrayed as beatboxing drug dealers.

New 12" Electronic Releases at Amoeba Hollywood - 5/08/09

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, May 5, 2009 03:39pm | Post a Comment

Electro/Techno Releases Coming this Weekend:
 
Gel Abril -THICKEN 12"
BAO016 
"RECALL DUB" unleashes GEL's well-known original stamp of fresh & bouncy techno, while "THICKEN" creates haunting atmospheres in its whistling melody & chopped up beats. Super chunky sounds with fine minimalist dub tech throughout.
 
Mike Shannon - BOX EP-ADAM MARSHALL 12"
CYN033
SHANNON dug deep into the archives for "THE BOX IS OPEN." It's nostalgic, with an old school jackin' Detroit vibe. ADAM MARSHALL on the remix tip, flipping the chords and adding a synth that just keeps elevating…kept us on our toes. Props from BROTHERS VIBE, JUSTIN LONG, MOSSA.
 
Basement Freaks - ARTIST SERIES 7 12" GG15      
 
Various - REGROOVED 3 EP 12" GG03    
 
Gel Abril - THICKEN 12" BAO016      
 
Lopez - BEAT DISPENSER 12" KEEP004     
Mike Shannon - BOX EP-ADAM MARSHALL 12" CYN033
Sam Young - PEEP THIS (FT. APHLETIK) 12" SEED026     
Tony Lionni - GOLDEN 12" LD005
Various - HEAR NU EVIL VOL.3 12" FID12004     
The Glass - WANNA BE DANCIN’ (IN FLAGRANTI) 12” SEED027
Marco Furstenberg - EIBENSTOCK EP 12” BAUM005
Resoe/Shinsuke - BAUM LIMITED PICTURE EDITION 001 12” BAUMLPE001
Dubatech/Havantape - BAUM LIMITED PICTURE EDITION 002 12” BAUMLPE002
Louderbach - AUTUMN 12” MINUS76
Louderbach - SHINE 12” MINUS75
STL - SILENT STATE 12” SMALLVILLE12
V.A. - IN LOVING MEMORY 4:4 12” STRX09
MRI - DIE STASIKINDER VOM BUSBAHNHOF 12” RSPRED030
Minilogue - ARB ALUMB ALMOH 12” MSHIP017
Dewalta - SALUKI 12” MEANDER004
Santiago Salazar - ARCADE 12” MACROM11
DJ Koze - MRS. BOJANGLES 12” CCS037
Honesty - RENAISSANCE EP 12” VIEW001
Martin Eyerer - SEVEN LIVES 12” KLING025


House Releases Coming this Weekend:
 
Exercise One - NO NEWS TODAY-DEADBEAT 12"
MOBILEE051
Here we see a different side of EXERCISE ONE. Gorgeous, enveloping ambient tracks, soundtrack ready synth ballads, a sort of retro-futurist electro pop sensibility. Features a mind melting remix from DEADBEAT ("WAGON REPAIR") who churns out a driving house track.
 
George Cochrane - MY SYNTHESIZER 12"
BH025
Debut for BLOCKHEAD sees CHOCHRANE & PRISMATIC cohorts ANDREW PHELAN & ORIGAMI team up for for a kick heavy house remix that you can feel in your chest with a DETROIT GRAND PUBAHS kind of vocal. LUKE SOLOMAN drops a house swagger remix along with ANTHONY MANSFIELD. Bumpin shiz for the clubs.
 
Chaz Jankel - UNDISCOVERED REMIXES 12" NANG02         
Marcello Napoletano - A PRESCRIPTION 12" MATH028                            
Various  - DROP MUSIC SAMPLER 1.0 PT 4 12" DRM063                             
Ame  - SETSA 12" IV22        
Arnaud Le Texier - ALMORAVIDS EP 12" VIS177       
Dev79 - IN YA FACE 12" SECLUS017     
Ekkohaus - ISLAND OF LOST CHILDREN V2 12" CCS035      
Exercise One - NO NEWS TODAY-DEADBEAT 12" MOBILEE051     
JDeep - DEEPER EDITS VOL 2 EP 12" DSE002      
Mirco Violi - CHAINLETTERS EP 12" IF12    
Windsurf - BIRD OF PARADISE 12" INT007      
Luna City Express -ROUGH NECK (BROTHERS VIBE) 12” MHR042
Kerri Chandler - A BASEMENT A RED LIGHT 12” KCLP623
Sacred Rhythm Music - AFRIKAN BASEMENT 12” SOIL3300
Moodymann - VOLUME 1 MUSIC PEOPLE/SUNDAY MORNING 12” MMVOL1
Moodymann - VOLUME 4 DON’T BE MISLED/DON’T YOU WANT 12” MMVOL4
Franco Cinelli - SINGA PURE 12” AD008
Bobby Konders - THE POEM/NERVOUS ACID 12” MB020
Mark Henning - VICK FOR PRESIDENT EP 12” FRANKIE044
Jaxson & amp/David Keno - TOUT LE TEMPS 12” KINDISCH023
Daze Maxim - ORGAN MESSAGE 12” HELLO014
Diskjokke - ASA NISI MASA 12” FP19
Touch Sensative/ T. Tobias - BODY STOP, AZUL BLUE, FOUGHT & AMP 12” FCL35

Dubstep Releases Coming this Weekend:
 
Greymatter - BELIEVE IN SOMETHING EP 12"
UU12001   
Excellent vinyl only EP that finds GREYMATTER branching out into beats and dubstep. Check the remix of "BELIEVE IN SOMETHING" by TEMPA's TRG, a fast dancefloor dubstep cut that takes up the whole A-side. The flip feats 3 more experimental, instrumental, beat-driven tracks. 
 
Martyn - NATURAL...(FLYING LOTUS RMX) 12"
3024003 CAT   
Out of stock for months, finally re-pressed! MARTYN recruits 2 of the biggest names in underground music for remix duties. FLYING LOTUS uses his frantic glitch-hop skills on his cleanse Mix of "NATURAL SELECTION," while 2562 takes "VANCOUVER" into his signature 2-step/techno hybrid territory.
 
J Kenzo - MORTAL KOMBAT 12" ARG023
 
Sigha  - ON THE STRIP 12” HFT007

SCRATCHING AWAY HIS US AIR FORCE PRESSURES - DJ ALF INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, May 4, 2009 10:20pm | Post a Comment
dj alf
While every turntablist has their own individual story of exactly how he/she became a hip-hop scratch DJ musician, most seem to share a somewhat similar history. Typically this starts out with them first becoming bedroom DJs, practicing their mixing, cutting, scratching, and beat-juggling, etc., skills for hours on end to prepare them for the typical next step, becoming battle DJs, entering contests and going head to head with other aspiring scratch DJs.

Baltimore, MD area turntablist DJ ALF took a slightly different path, having never entered a DJ battle in his life. A self-taught DJ and producer who is currently putting the finishing touches on his debut album This Way Or That Way, ALF developed his scratching musical path while simultaneously serving as a member of the US armed forces.

In fact, practicing hip-hop scratch music while a member of the US Air Force (which he is no longer a member of) helped maintain ALF's sanity, especially while stationed overseas. He would "scratch away" his "pressures," as he reveals in the interview that follows.

Amoeblog: Pre DJing, did you ever learn to play any musical instruments? If so, how has that influenced your approach to DJing?

DJ ALF: I used to play the clarinet from 4th grade to the 12th grade. I remember some basic music theory, which has helped me some in my DJ career. Since I used to play in a marching band, concert band, and orchestra, I must say that alone has helped me easily figure what fits in terms of doing freestyle turntable orchestration with others.

Amoeblog: When/where was the first time you ever scratched?

(In which we witness love and marriage and indegestion.)

Posted by Job O Brother, May 4, 2009 01:29pm | Post a Comment
wedding

Howdy!

The boyfriend and I just returned from a weekend in the great country of Texas – Houston, to be exact. We went there to celebrate the marriage of some neat humans.

The boyfriend was Best Man at the wedding, so I spent a lot of time in the chapel entertaining myself as he practiced marching down the aisle, handing over rings, smuggling in tequila shots and body-blocking any attempts the bride might have of going “runaway” – you know, typical Best Man duties.

Having been raised in a church, I know how to find all the best hiding spots, and I felt immediately at home. Curled in a cool, dark alcove between the pipe organ and a wood-carved dove of peace, I listened to music on my iPhone and surfed the World Wide Web – reading The Guardian, watching this and this, and wondering why Facebook suggested I be friends with Bill Murray (who I still haven’t forgiven for dog-earing my copy of Dubliners).

Rice Memorial Chapel, the house of God in question, is tucked centrally on the campus grounds of Rice University. It’s a lovely, small chapel, decorated with gold tile and royal blue carpeting. It is noticeably lacking in denominational iconography – a single, movable, wood cross sat off-stage – which is to be expected, I suppose, from a University that specializes in applied sciences. Stained glass glorifying Dr. Willem Kolff healing the crippled with Jarvik-7’s and panels depicting various stages of the Scopes “Monkey” Trial would not have seemed out of place.

Amoeba Hollywood World Music Top 10 For 2009...So far

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, May 4, 2009 12:29am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Hollywood World Music Top 10 For 2009

1. Zoe-Reptilectric
2. Amadou & Mariam-Welcome To Mali
3. V/A -African Scream Contest
4. Orchestre Poly Ritmo-Vol. 1- The Vodoun Effect: Funk and Sato from Benin's Obscure Label
5. Eydie Gorme Y Los Panchos-Cantan En Espanol
6. V/A-Nigeria 70: Lagos Jump
7. V/A- Vol.1-Nigeria 70
8. Rodrigo Y Gabriela -Live In Japan
9. Manu Chao-Clandestino
10. V/A- 78's From The EMI Archives: Sprigs Of Time

About some of the artists:

Zoe, a rock band from Mexico City, is on the top of Amoeba Hollywood's World Music chart for 2009. I wrote about Zoe in the beginning of this year in a blog entitled, Music Latin Music Majors Don't Want You To Hear, which was about how late in the game U.S. labels are when it comes to releasing popular Spanish rock artists domestically. To avoid being outsold by download sites, we ordered the import version of Reptilectric and sold out of all the imports we bought way before their U.S. release. Their in-store performance at the Hollywood store on 4/24 also fueled sales, far exceeding sale expectations for that evening. In short, Zoe fans came in vast numbers and Amoeba Hollywood was not fully prepared. Hey, it happens sometimes.

CADBURY'S ELECTRO EYEBROW DANCE TV COMMERCIAL

Posted by Billyjam, May 3, 2009 08:20pm | Post a Comment


You gotta love this current UK TV commerical for Cadbury's chocolate that utilizes the classic electro track (longtime breakdance anthem) "Don't Stop the Rock"' by Freestyle as the perfect soundtrack to its two young stars' eyebrow dance. The 2009 production is by the ever innovative and popular A Glass And A Half Full production company, who last year produced the equally popular in the UK Cadbury's "Gorilla" TV spot that expertly utilized Phil Collins' "In The Air Tonight" as its backtrack, as well as the Cadbury "Trucks" commercial (below) that used Queen's "Don't Stop Me Now" as its soundtrack. So popular was the Cadbury's eyebrow dance with the public that it spawned a JiveBrow 09 contest (see highlights below) held by A Glass And A Half Full production company earlier this year.





Asian-American Cinema Part I - Asian-American Silent Film

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 3, 2009 03:00pm | Post a Comment
In the early days of west coast film production, there were few roles for Asian actors except as unflattering stereotypes or anonymous background work. Nonetheless, a small number pursued careers in front of and behind the camera, intersecting and influencing Hollywood's embryonic phase. Although most worked in near complete obscurity, two -- Anna May Wong and Sessue Hayakawa -- became veritable superstars. They still were virtually unable to find roles to their liking, since most of the lead roles (still usually degrading) went to actors in yellowface, a practice that continued long after blackface became taboo. Anna May Wong and Sessue Hayakawa used their earnings to attempt to improve opportunities for less famous Asians by creating more positive depictions, following black cinema's lead. However, with immigration restricted and laws preventing citizenship and property ownership, even the few rich, famous Americanized Asians faced perhaps greater challenges.



ASIAN-AMERICANS IN THE SILENT FILM ERA

In the end, early efforts to establish a viable Asian-American Cinema failed to take hold. Within a few years, the American film industry would be dominated by Hollywood, who during the '30s, '40s, '50s and '60s were responsible for most depictions of Asian-Americans. An alternative Asian-American Cinema wouldn't appear until the '70s, taking off in the '80s before growing considerably in breadth and scope in the '90s and '00s.

Anthony Mann /James Stewart/ Rock Hudson @ New Bev

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 2, 2009 03:00pm | Post a Comment
Having just seen a couple of Mann's earliest films, I'm very intrigued by this double feature. In addition to Stewart & Hudson, you've got Shelly Winters, Dan Duryea, Tony Curtis, Harry Morgan & Arthur Kennedy as well as William Daniels (Naked City/Abandoned/Brute Force) behind the lens on Winchester '73.

Sun-Tues
New Beverly Cinema
7165 Beverly Blvd.
LA, CA  90036

Modern Romantix Tonight!!!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 2, 2009 02:35pm | Post a Comment

This Week At The New Bev!

Posted by phil blankenship, May 2, 2009 10:23am | Post a Comment

The May / June Calendar is NOW online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm


Friday & Saturday May 1 & 2


Two Favorites of Forrest J. Ackerman

Vetiver Performance & Interview Video

Posted by Miss Ess, May 1, 2009 02:16pm | Post a Comment
vetiver

Local band Vetiver has risen in the folk rock ranks over the past few years, and their latest album, out now on the lovely Sub Pop, is called Tight Knit. We have a video of Vetiver performing May 15, 2008 at Amoeba Berkeley freshly up on the website as well as a video interview which I've included below, conducted by our own Arvel. The songs they play at the instore performance are mostly from their excellent covers album Thing of the Past, and also include one of my personal favorites, "Maureen," originally found on the Between EP. Check out the performance, track by track right here.


Stay tuned for an upcoming interview here in the blogs with Alissa Anderson, formerly of Vetiver, Andy Cabic's other half and a bonafide rock photographer with several album credits to her name, including Devendra Banhart's Cripple Crow.

Click here to read the interview I did with Andy from Vetiver last year.

Also, our website has tons of performance and interview videos and photos with the many artists who have hit the Amoeba stage over the years, such as Devendra Banhart, Band of Horses, Flight of the Conchords, M.I.A, Thurston Moore, Six Organs of Admittance and a zillion more. Just click here to take a peek at the archives.

Queen "Bohemian Rhapsody" Old School Computer Remix

Posted by Billyjam, May 1, 2009 10:07am | Post a Comment


The above video/song is by YouTube user bd594 who took a bunch of old-school computer gear to recreate Queen's “Bohemian Rhapsody" by synching the mechanical noises from the hardware’s motors into a damn good recreation of the song. In his description of the video he posted two weeks ago, bd594 wrote:

"This is dedicated to all fans of Queen and hey, let's not forget about Mike Myers and Dana Carvey of Wayne's World. No effects or sampling were used. What you see is what you hear (does that even make sense?). Atari 800XL was used for the lead piano/organ sound, Texas Instruments TI-99/4a as lead guitar, 8 Inch Floppy Disk as Bass, 3.5 inch Harddrive as the gong, HP ScanJet 3C was used for all vocals. Please note I had to record the HP scanner 4 seperate times for each voice. I wanted to buy 4 HP scanners but for some reason sellers on E-Bay expect you to pay $80-$100; I got mine for $30. I keep hearing parts of the song are out of tune. Keep in mind the scanner and floppy drive are not musical instruments. These are mechanical devices whose motors tend to drift and can cause some notes to be out of tune."

AMOEBA MUSIC HIP-HOP WEEKLY ROUND UP: 05:01:09

Posted by Billyjam, May 1, 2009 09:40am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music San Hollywood Hip-Hop Top Five: 05:01:09
grouch and eligh
1) The Grouch & Eligh Go G+E! (Legendary)

2) Rick Ross Deeper Than Rap (Maybach/Poe Boy/Def Jam)

3) Aesher Roth Asleep in the Bread Aisle   (SRC/Universal)

4) DOOM Born Like This (Lex)

5) Mr. Lif I Heard It Today (Bloodbot/Traffic Ent) 

The Grouch & Eligh, who were number one at the San Francisco store last week, are also holding down the number one slot at Hollywood Amoeba this week with Say G&E!, the sometime hip-hop duo's third collaboration in a series on Legendary Music. And this past Monday (April 27th) they put on a great free in-store show at the San Francisco Amoeba. "It was awesome!," reported Amoeba's Luis from the Haight Street store. "Scarab and Very, aka Afroclassics (who recently released The Classic EP on Legendary Music), got it going when they went on first and performed for about half an hour. Then DJ Fresh (the DJ for the whole show) got busy. And then the Grouch and Eligh came on and wrecked it."

The Living Legends duo, Luis reported, did songs spanning their long respective solo and joint careers, much to the delight of the lucky in-store attendees. Songs off the new album they performed include the title track, "Say G&E!" Also doing well at each three Amoeba stores are the latest from both (MF)DOOM (Born Like This on Lex Records) and the politically charged Boston emcee Mr. Lif (I Heard It Today on Bloodbot through Traffic Entertainment).