Amoeblog

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Girl Talk

Posted by Amoebite, March 31, 2009 10:12pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

Coachella LineupGirl Talk

Day #15 - Artist #15 - Girl Talk:

Girl Talk - Feed the Animals

Not a girl. And there's no talking.

Gregg Gillis, hailing from Pittsburgh, is a DJ/mashup extraordinaire that has released four albums since 2002, and is the sole proprietor of the musical chop shop persona that is Girl Talk.

I'm surprised Girl Talk's most recent album, Feed The Animals, released in 2008 by rabble-rouser sampling label Illegal Art, wasn't sold in a brown paper bag. Possibly due to the controversy it anticipated (by failing to legally license any of the sampled music), the album provides no song titles or identifing information anywhere on the packaging except for what looks like a ransom note folded inside the case, listing hundreds of songs/artists sampled for the album.
Girl Talk Laptop
Feed The Animals encompasses the last 40+ years of music and pop culture into 53 minutes and 53 seconds of "I can't believe he just did that..." internal monologues. Think mash-up inventor DJ Z-Trip meets 80's physical comedian Gallagher. (Including plastic sheeting on the laptop. See photo -------> )

Happy 75th Birthday John D Loudermilk!

Posted by Whitmore, March 31, 2009 09:57pm | Post a Comment

Today is the 75th birthday of a legendary songwriter most people have never heard of, but as the story so often goes, you may not know the name but you know the song. The songs of John D. Loudermilk have been recorded by hundreds and hundreds artists over the last fifty plus years. From Rockabilly greats like Arnie Derksen, Marvin Rainwater, Jimmy Newman, and Billy Lee Riley to Country Music Hall of Famers like Webb Pierce, George Jones, Kitty Wells, Brenda Lee and Hank Williams Jr. to soul, jazz and funk artists like Nina Simone, Ramsey Lewis, Brother Jack McDuff, William Bell, Solomon Burke and even James Brown. In the rock world Loudermilk’s songs have been recorded by everyone from Jerry Lee Lewis to Jefferson Airplane to Jimi Hendrix and The Jayhawks.
 
John D. Loudermilk was born in Durham, North Carolina March 31, 1934. He wasn’t the only family member with some musical chops; his cousins are Ira and Charlie Loudermilk, better known to country music fans as the Louvin Brothers.  
 
In the mid 1950’s Loudermilk got his start recording some of his own material on the Colonial Record label based in North Carolina under the stage name Johnny Dee. After signing with Columbia Records, he began using his own name and had a Top 20 hit in the UK with "Language of Love" in 1962. Though he continually recorded many solo albums and singles into the 1980’s, his lasting mark on music history is that of a solid first class tunesmith. Loudermilk not only could write some serious songs for serious people but he had an unusually successful career on the novelty side of things.
 
Starting in late 1956, Loudermilk’s songwriting career took off with "A Rose and a Baby Ruth" -- a top 10 country hit in 1956 for "George Hamilton and the Country Gentlemen." (Later to be covered by, of all people, John Fahey!) Later that same year Eddie Cochran recorded Loudermilk’s "Sittin' in the Balcony," becoming Cochran’s first top 20 single, which has since become something of a rockabilly standard. In 1959 Loudermilk scored his first huge international hit with the song “Waterloo” as recorded by Stonewall Jackson, which hit the top of the US Country charts but also saw chart action around the world.
 
But no doubt, Loudermilk's signature song is “Tobacco Road.” He likes to say it’s partly autobiographical, but I suspect that’s just good old fashion bullshit. Tobacco Road is a section in East Durham near to where Loudermilk grew up. There, bails of tobacco are rolled down the way to the warehouse, hence the name. According to almost everything I’ve ever read about it, Tobacco Road did have something of a bad ass reputation, and was known as quite the unsavory neighborhood and a part of town where after dark even the police department avoided entering. This song was a huge hit during the first British invasion, sung by the Nashville Teens in the summer of 1964. What works so perfectly in their version is the harsh, desperate spin they put to the lyrics and melody. It still sounds raw today. “Tobacco Road” has since been covered dozens of times from a wide variety of artists like Richard 'Groove' Holmes, the Blues Magoos, Jimi Hendrix and even David Lee Roth recorded a Spanish version, “La Calle Del Tabaco,” in 1986. Actually, any garage band worth its beans has rocked this classic tale of woe … I believe it's required playing.
 
Another top 40 pop-rock classic, "Indian Reservation," was originally written by John Loudermilk in 1959 and recorded by Marvin Rainwater, as "Pale Faced Indian." Later on Loudermilk reshaped some of the lyrics and released it in the mid 1960s as "The Lament of The Cherokee Reservation Indian." In 1969 Don Fardon shortened the title to "Indian Reservation" and scored a mammoth worldwide hit everywhere except here in the states, which was very fortunate for The Raiders featuring Mark Lindsay. Two years later their version mimicked Fardon’s interpretation almost note for note and scored a huge hit in the US. According to lore, Loudermilk was once asked by Casey Kasem of American Top 40 Radio about the back story of “Indian Reservation.” Loudermilk concocted a tall tale about being rescued by Cherokee Indians after crashing his car in a blinding blizzard only to be held captive by his rescuers. He was finally released once he promised he would write a song telling of their plight. The story appeared several times on the show; Kasem is quoted as saying, "one of the most incredible stories we've ever told on AT40." I bet!
 
One of my favorite John D. Loudermilk songs is “Torture.” Originally a top 20 hit for Kris Jensen in 1962, there is a slightly obscure 1980 version released as a single by the French cult artist Hermine Demoriane. I love her version! She sounds a bit like Nico, but pulls out a bit more drama in the delivery. I know very little about Hermine except she was supposed to be married to the English poet Hugo Williams and performed in the film Jubilee (1977). And though I don’t believe much of anything I read on the internet -- actually very little, and that includes my own blog -- Hermione supposedly studied and practiced tightrope walking and wrote a book about it called Tightrope Walker.
 
In 1969 Loudermilk temporarily tripped out, got hip and underground, and released the soon to be classic, neo-psych album The Open Mind of John D Loudermilk. Finally in recent years it has been re-released on CD. I recommend it, though it is ever so slightly peculiar, but in just … I don’t know … that peculiar, peculiar way.
 
John D. Loudermilk was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1976.
 
Here is a small list of some of his other classic songs:
 
Angela Jones” -- Johnny Ferguson version peaked at #27 in Billboard's but the version to hear is by Milk and their bubble gum version from 1969
 
Break My Mind” -- covered by both Linda Rondstadt and Gram Parsons
 
Ebony Eyes” -- the Everly Brothers' perfect version was a huge tear-drop rock hit in 1961, reaching #8
 
Google Eye” -- kind of a ridiculous novelty song, though it was a big hit in France, sung in French by the neo Ye-Ye group Les Lionceaux
 
Norman” – Sue Thompson’s biggest hit peaked at #3
 
Sad Movies (Make Me Cry)” -- another big hit for Sue Thompson, this one reached #5 on the Billboard charts. This song was also a hit in France, this time for Sylvie Vartan in the French version: "Quand le film est triste." During her career, the Ye-Ye singer Vartan recorded several Loudermilk songs.
 
Talk Back Trembling Lips” -- A #1 hit by country singer Ernest Ashworth. This song has probably been covered a least a hundred times, and almost always by Country music artists.
 
Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye” -- an absolutely great and beautiful song, probably the most recorded tune of John Loudermilk. There may be as many as 200 versions floating around; the most successful version was by The Casinos in 1967.
 
This Little Bird” -- was once recorded by Marianne Faithfull in the mid sixties. Her version reached # 5 in the UK, but only #32 in the US. Later it was recorded by Nancy Sinatra and by Jewel.
 
Thou Shalt Not Steal” -- from 1964, a classic track, became one of Dick & Dee Dee’s biggest sellers
 
Turn Me On” -- Nina Simone did a great early version of this song, so incredibly laid back. Just a few years back, Norah Jones re-did it in a similar manner
 
Anyway, Happy 75th Birthday John D. Loudermilk!




The Crying Light - Antony and the Johnsons

Posted by Miss Ess, March 31, 2009 08:02pm | Post a Comment
Antony of Antony and the Johnsons has created a more than worthy followup to his wonderful I Am A Bird Now. This new album is called The Crying Light, and it is as hauntingly gorgeous as anything else Antony has put out.

the crying light by antony and the johnsons

On The Crying Light there are some beautifully unexpected moments and, as always, a lot of vocal vibrato. Through it all, we glimpse Earth though the eyes of a keen observer of the natural world, who penetratingly sees both its agony antony and the johnsonsand ecstacy. Strings abound on the first track "Everglade," while the second song "Epilepsy is Dancing" is delicate and features guitar and wind instruments. "Aeon" is an awesomely gorgeous torch song and plea dedicated to the universe and its eternity. One of the record's centerpieces, "Another World" (also included on this past fall's ep Another World), longs for a place beyond our planet, a place that is not so limiting and broken. There's a quite a bit of sonic variation for someone who has been so critically defined merely by the timbre of his voice. No doubt, that voice is there in all its smoky, vibrating glory. It blankets every track in its special, warm glow. The release, the silences, the showiness of it all is just perfection. But the music that flows through this album is just as glorious as the otherwordly vocals.

Frightmare

Posted by phil blankenship, March 31, 2009 07:56pm | Post a Comment
Frightmare Horror VHS  Frightmare horror movie

Frightmare plot synopsis

Vestron Video VA 3026

From the women's picture to the chick flick

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 31, 2009 05:52pm | Post a Comment
30 Helens

I wrongly assumed that it would be easy to fire off a blog briefly summarizing the history of women’s pictures. When I began, I quickly realized that it is a genre that’s simplistically treated as synonymous with both weepies/tearjerkers and their near opposite, the rom-com; it quickly proved to be more than I bargained for, which is why it’s showing up on this, the last day of Women’s History Month. The history of the genre occupies an interesting position, little discussed and yet obviously affecting and responding to the Hollywood narrative, the larger global film market, and broader history. Anyway, it proved to be a bit too much so, here's the fast & furious driveby account of a genre that deserves more.


First of all, tear-inducing films are by no means all women's pictures, which is why someone coined the annoying term “guy cry” for young male-targeted stories/films about dying dogs (e.g. My Dog Skip, Old Yeller, Where the Red Fern Grows, &c). For adult males, sentimental melodramas (usually tempered by the macho backdrop of war, the wild west or sports (e.g. Bang the Drum Slowly, Brian’s Song, Knute Rockne) allow men the opportunity to cry with less shame. But, whereas men generally try to resist crying, telling themselves in the heat of a battle scene as the hero lies dying in his buddy's arms, "It's only a movie. It's only a movie. You will not cry!"; women, it is assumed, seek out movies with the hope that they will have "good cry." I have no doubt that this is part of why women’s pictures have rarely been afforded serious critical examination and were only lauded, for the most part, near the beginning of film history.

KUTMASTA KURT INTERVIEW

Posted by Billyjam, March 31, 2009 06:20am | Post a Comment
kutmasta kurt
Kutmasta Kurt
is the ever- active Los Angeles based producer, turntablist/DJ, and label owner of Threshold Recordings. The Bay Area transplant, who started out at KZSU radio and who released his first record twenty years ago, is best known for his longtime collaborations with such artists as Kool Keith and Motion Man with whom he  worked jointly on the Masters of Illusion project and also individually on numerous other projects. 

Kutmasta Kurt embarks on the Dr. Dooom Vs. Dr. Octagon tour this week with former Ultramagnetic MCs frontman  Kool Keith. The two artists have worked on such projects as Dr. Dooom and Dr. Octagon as well as such Kool Keith albums as Sex Style, Diesel Truckers, and Matthew. Kutmasta Kurt also produced the Ultra (Kool Keith + fellow former Ultramagnetic MC Tim Dog) album Big Time in 1996.

Additionally he occassionally dons a long fake beard (see pic left) and morphs into his fun Funky Redneck alter-ego. As such he released the 2004 album RedNeck Games, whose original name had to be changed due to pressure from the Olympics Committee.

I recently caught up with Kurt to ask him about this run in with the Olympics folks and the reaction his Funky Redneck persona typically generates, his illustrious recording career, the status of his record label in these digital downloading times, his favorite recording equipment, and his earliiest hip-hop memories.

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: thenewno2

Posted by Amoebite, March 30, 2009 06:12pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

Coachella Lineupthenewno2

Day #14 - Artist #14 - thenewno2 (pronounced "the new number two"):

Thenewno2

Paul McCartney is not going to be the only one with Beatle blood on stage at this year's Coachella. On Saturday April 18, 2009, thenewno2 are prepared to grab the baton from where the "quiet one" unfortunately handed it off much too early. Dhani Harrison, son of the late great George Harrison, along with longtime friend and musical partner Oliver Hecks, comprise the creative mind of thenewno2. The result is the accomplished debut album, You Are Here, released tomorrow, March 31st, that sounds like what one would expect if post-Beatles George joined Radiohead. Dhani never gives the impression that he's trying to be a Beatle, but he definitely hasn't forgotten that he is the son of one.

FRENCH OSCAR-WINNING COMPOSER MAURICE JARRE DIES AT 84

Posted by Billyjam, March 30, 2009 04:48pm | Post a Comment
maurice jarre
Maurice Jarre
, the French conductor and Oscar-winning composer, and father of electronic music composer and producer Jean-Michel Jarre, died yesterday (March 29) at age 84. The cause of his death has not yet been announced. The composer, who had over 150 movie soundtrack credits to his name, won Academy Awards for his orchestral scores for the films Doctor Zhivago in 1965, Lawrence of Arabia in 1962, and A Passage to India in 1984.

Other films that the extremely prolific artist composed the scores for include The Train in 1964, Ryan's Daughter in 1970, The Man Who Would Be King in 1975, The Message in 1976, Dead Poets Society in 1989, Jacob's Ladder in 1990, Ghost in 1990, Witness in 1985, The Year of Living Dangerously in 1982, Fatal Attraction in 1987, No Way Out in 1987, The Damned in 1969, The Tin Drum in 1979, and Circle of Deceit in 1981. Jarre, who lived for many years in Los Angeles to be close to the Hollywood film studios, was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his a passage to indiacontribution to the art of film.

Born in Lyon, France in 1924, he began his third level studies as an engineering student at Lyon University and enrolled in the engineering school at the Sorbonne. But it was against his father's wishes that he quit engineering and switched to music, dropping out of the Sorbonne and soon after enrolling at the Paris Conservatoire. According to the UK Telegraph, it was there that he studied under the Swiss composer Arthur Honegger, the timpanist Félix Passerone and Joseph Martenot, inventor of the Martenot Waves, an electronic keyboard that prefigured the modern synthesizer and which Jarre would often use in his film scores.

[Insert wordless visual here.]

Posted by Job O Brother, March 30, 2009 03:55pm | Post a Comment
silent film

Not to lure you away from the safe and nurturing environment that is the Amoeblog, but, for those of you interested in reading it with your eyes, here is a link to a recent interview I had with one of my favorites, Marianne Faithfull.

Now then, on to a topic that is not oft spoke of; that is, silent films. Amoeba Music Hollywood has a small but rich silent film section which, at this writing, is located on the mezzanine. I’m taking this opportunity to advocate a greater appreciation and exploration of this antiquated genre.

For many people, silent films are a known but ignored craft, as though the technological progress that married sound to film rendered the silent precursors an inferior product. While I do hail “talkies” as a wonderful invention, I still feel there is much joy to be had in silent cinema. If nothing else, knowing a bit about it can be enough to get you laid by art-school chicks taking a break from experimenting with bisexuality.

louise brooks

The first silent I saw that rocked me was the tragic drama Pandora’s Box [original, German title: Die Büchse der Pandora]. Released in 1929 and directed by Austrian Georg Wilhelm Pabst, it stars the gorgeous and gifted Louise Brooks in the lead role.


Another gem I treasure is Wings, the first film to win an Academy Award for Best Picture (and the only silent film to do so). Released in 1927 and directed by William A. Wellman, it stars Clara Bow, the quintessential flapper icon, and has a cameo by not-yet-superstar Gary Cooper.

The Power

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 30, 2009 01:00am | Post a Comment
andy gibb after dark lp coverandrew llyod weber song & dance lp coverthunderfire lp cover
hellstar a distant thunder lp coverbarry mcguire cosmic cowboy lp coverblack sabbath live evil lp cover
sue fink big promise lp coverthe pips at last lp covertamara magic dancer lp cover
An amazing collection of powerful performers. I never realized just how many musicians have the power to hold flames or flaming objects. I wonder what gave Andy Gibb all that energy?
Disco Rick back from hell coverthe four seasons who loves you lp coverkenny loggins keep the fire lp cover
exuma life lp covermighty diamonds ice on fire lp covermichael lovesmith I can make it happen lp cover
high on mount rushmore lp coverlenny williams spark of love lp coverwinton felder gentle fire lp cover
The fellow on the Kansas LP below (Audio-Visions) recieves his power from the lightning bolt pictured directly above him. Really. Said lightning bolt picture is the inner sleeve for Audio-Visions. And you thought he was just dipping into someone's crank stash...
night ranger lp back coverkansas inner sleeveal stewart past, present and future lp cover
kansas audio-visions lp back cover

Boris: Back to Black with a foggy new dronathon and super limited double-live LP.

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, March 30, 2009 12:21am | Post a Comment
Boris live at Amoeba Berkeley
Japan's reigning purveyors of thunderous heavy rock, Boris, hit the shelves of Amoeba San Francisco's Underground Japanese Rock section with a one-two punch this winter with their latest studio recording, Cloud Chamber (featuring, once again, guest Ghost guitarist Michio Kurihara), and Smile -Live in Prague-- a very limited (only 425 copies issued) double-live LP "official bootleg" recorded (with permission) in the Czech Republic on the trio's latest tour in support of their album Smile. Though both are pricey, as doubless many a Boris fan has already guessed, both are worth shelling out the exra dough for, as many a Boris fan surely already knows. Here's why: Cloud Chamber is a first class return to the strom and drang style doom that fans of (lowercase 'b') boris have found in previous releases like flood and at last -feedbacker. It is just the sort of storm surge of sound that lays defenseless listeners down as if prone on the slab, hypnotized for sacrifice; beware of drowning. Smile - Live in Prague, on the other hand, has garnered more pointed attention for its sleeve art than for the bounty of copies we've recieved, given its inherent rareness. Some call the artwork, an obvious homage to San Francisco black metal band Von, a flagrant rip off. I find it delightful and, really, par for the course considering the lengths Fangs Anal Satan (Boris' art-working name) goes to produce, or reproduce if you will, some of the most coveted, kick ass packaging that drives both sticker prices and collectors' expectations upwards of the norm. Here are some of my favorite of Boris' artful tributes as, the old adage says, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. (And check out images and reviews from Boris' amazing three Amoeba instores-- they've played each and every Amoeba -- here, here and here.)

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Paul Weller

Posted by Amoebite, March 29, 2009 07:52pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth


Coachella LineupPaul Weller

Day #13 - Artist #13 - Paul Weller:

Throw on your best Ben Sherman shirt with the crisp collar, jump on your Vespa, and scoot your way over to Indio, California where the "Modfather" himself, Paul Weller, will be performing during the now-infamous sunset time slot at Coachella on Sunday April 19, 2009.

(Writer's note: Three hours of writing and research for this post was just deleted in one second by a rogue click of the mouse. I feel sick to my stomach. For some reason, the only thing that is keeping me from launching my laptop out my front window right now is listening to "Escape" from Metallica's album Ride the Lightning [1984]. So please enjoy it with me.)


Anyways, back to the topic at hand. Since it is now 3:30am, there is no way I will be able to recreate the masterpiece that would have been this blog post. So in the spirit of Brian Wilson and Axl Rose, I will give you the best I have now, and for the next few decades I will talk about how the "lost Paul Weller profile" was the epitome of Web 2.0 creative genius!

This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 29, 2009 05:41pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly!

The March / April calendar is now online:
www.NewBevCinema.com

March 24-31:
Legendary actor & cult movie icon Sid Haig will appear at the theater as we present some of his favorite movies as well as some of his own films.

Read the LA CityBeat article here.



Sunday & Monday March 29 & 30

Sid Haig Picks Some of His Favorite Films!

Lawrence of Arabia
(1962)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0056172/
dir. David Lean, starring Peter O'Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn, Jack Hawkins, Omar Sharif, José Ferrer
Sun: 5:00 only; Mon: 8:00

The Master Waits while the Servant Baits: The Servant (1963)

Posted by Charles Reece, March 29, 2009 10:04am | Post a Comment
losey servant title
servant losey bogarde fox

I and the public know
What all schoolchildren learn,
Those to whom evil is done
Do evil in return.
-- W. H. Auden, "September 1, 1939"

It was Harold Pinter weekend at the Egyptian Theater in Hollywood, so I had a chance to see one of the best Joseph Losey films, The Servant, on the big screen. Pinter contributed the screenplay, based on the novel by Robin Maugham. (Because I loathe writing plot summaries, here's one.) The presentation was co-sponsored by Outfest for good reason -- it's a classic of queer cinema. Not counting the fairly recent 300, the 60s produced my favorite gay films, The Victim and The Killing of Sister George, along with Losey's. The three form a trilogy to my mind: all are British; both The Victim and The Servant feature Dirk Bogarde, the finest of cerebral actors, making you feel every thought his characters have; Losey trained  and will always be closely aligned with Robert Aldrich, the director of Sister George. Although Aldrich was more of a bare-knuckles kind of director, his film shares with the more intellectual Losey's an approach to sexual identity and politics that I prefer: as a given, full of suggestion and with a good deal of nuance.

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Noah and the Whale

Posted by Amoebite, March 28, 2009 09:27pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth


Coachella Lineup 

Day #12 - Artist #12 - Noah and the Whale:

Noah and the Whale Noah and the Whaleformed in 2006 in Twickenham, London, England, playing a brand of folk influenced indie-pop rock and released their debut album Peaceful, the World Lays Me Down in August 2008. At first I wanted to just write these guys off as just another indie-pop band singing love songs. But the more I listened to it, the more curious I was. I promised I wasn't going to use the cheesy "metaphor" method of describing a band after I used it in The Hold Steady profile, but again, this band's music seemed unique, yet there was something oddly familiar about it. It was as if they were channeling someone or something in order to create their music. After two or three listens, I couldn't hear the band anymore. It wasn't that the music was inaudible, it was that I couldn't hear Noah and the Whale on the surface. I could only hear a particular voice that was coming from within it.

Ladies In Red

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 28, 2009 05:30pm | Post a Comment
amii stewart try love lp coverlena horne give the lady what she wants lp covermeli'sa morgan do me baby lp cover
chaka khan lp coverfreda payne contactbelinda carlisle band of gold cover
Baillie & the boys lp covernana mouskouri an american album lp coverhelen reddy i don't know how to love him lp cover
bonnie prudden otto cesana keep fit be happy lp coverolivia newton-john soul kiss lp cover
los tres caballeros lp coveranita ward songs of love lp coverfreda payne hot lp cover
eydie gorme de corazon a corazon lp covernancy wilson take my love lp cover
ethel's ridin' high lp covermonster orchestra up jumped the devil lp coverkarla bonoff restless nights lp cover

March 27, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, March 28, 2009 12:10am | Post a Comment
12 Rounds movie ticket stub

12 Rounds movie poster John Cena

12 Rounds WWE motion picture

Mann Chinese theater

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: N.A.S.A.

Posted by Amoebite, March 27, 2009 08:19pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth


 

Day #11 - Artist #11 - N.A.S.A.:

Have you ever sat around with friends and posed the question, "If you could hypothetically pick any musical artists, from any time period or genre of music to create a band or musical collaboration, who would you choose?" Before my friends and I were old enough to drive and we were too broke to actually get out of the house and do something, we would gather in a friend's bedroom on a Saturday night listening to our favorite CDs and posing this timeless question to each other. I remember us being fifteen years old debating this topic vehemently, each of us thinking we were the ultimate authority on music. But the only "dream collaboration" input I can remember from the discussions of that age is being adamant about Dave Grohl on drums and Maynard James Keenan (Tool) on vocals. 

Anyone have any other ideas? How about:
David Byrne (Talking Heads), Chuck D (Public Enemy) and Z-Trip
or
Tom Waits and Kool Keith
or
Rza (Wu-Tang Clan) and John Frusciante (Red Hot Chili Peppers)
or
Karen O (Yeah Yeah Yeahs) and Ol' Dirty Bastard (Wu-Tang Clan)

Ladies and gentlemen, N.A.S.A. has done it! They've made our dreams come true. These hypothetical collaborations are now an actuality. N.A.S.A., which stands for North America South America, the creation between producers Squeek E. Clean (Los Angeles) and DJ Zegon (Brazil), accomplished these collaborations on their five-year-in-the-making debut album The Spirit of Apollo, released February 17, 2009.

Jumpers

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 27, 2009 06:45pm | Post a Comment
redemption 87 lp coverthe fantastic chi-lites lp coverattitude ep cover
baltimora living in the background lp coverdavid bowie never let me down lp covertim scott swear ep back cover
siempre pa'arriba lp coverbest of the cryan' shames lp coverelton john lp cover
freddy kenton ooh la la lp coverleo sayer endless flight lp cover
textones lp coverozone jump on it lp covery&t back cover
rail ep back covermusic explosion little bit o'soul lp cover
sly and the family stone fresh lp covermighty high lp back coverstarship we built this city cover
los grijos lp coverj. geils band back covernewbeats run baby run lp cover

Why Is The Ratio Of Female To Male Rappers Still So Uneven? Conscious Daughters + Monica Lynch Weigh in on the Topic: Women in hip-hop Part IV: Women's History Month

Posted by Billyjam, March 27, 2009 05:00am | Post a Comment
queen latifah all hail the queenWhy, after all these years, is the number of female rappers still radically less than that of their male counterparts? Is it really that not as many women want to be rappers? Or rather that they are being shut out and discriminated against, and simply not encouraged to be hip-hop artists? Encouragement ultimately comes down to sales figures, so is that not enough hip-hop fans support women artists? 

"Women can't rap" used to be the common criticism of females heard back in the day. Interestingly, these days the ratio of female rap fans has grown, yet the number of female rap artists has not grown proportionately. 

To answer these questions, which have always puzzled me, I asked a few women who have been in the business for a while: CMG and Special One of the longtime Oakland female duo The Conscious Daughters, and Monica Lynch, the president of Tommy Boy Records during the years 1981 - 1998 where she was instrumental in launching the careers of such artists as Afrika Bambaataa, De La Soul, Digital Underground, House of Pain, Naughty By Nature, and Queen Latifah. She still works closely with Queen Latifah, helping guide the artist, actor, investor, product spokesperson's with her music-related endeavors.

"When you look at rap as a subset of the hip-hop culture at large, you see that a vast vast majority of the DJs were male, a vast majority of the graffiti artists were guys, the vast majority of the breakdance crews were men, and the vast majority of the rappers were male. So it was just an extension of the origins of hip-hop culture being a predominantly male cuture," said the former Tommy Boy president, who firsthand witnessed rap music morph from supposed "fad" into an unstoppable global cultural movement.

Ten Questions For Talib Kweli

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 27, 2009 01:10am | Post a Comment

Talib Kweli can easily be crowned as one of Brooklyn’s finest mc’s. For years the industry veteran has championed positive portrayals of urban society through his eternally omniscient lyrics. After the critical and commercial success on Black Star, Kweli, alongside “Ms. Fat Booty” himself, Mos Def, forced record labels to pay closer attention to underground Hip-Hop. Before the Internet, an underground artist struggled immensely without the help of perpetual touring. Needless to say, the crowned emcee puts on a concert better than blueberry pancakes and mimosas on a breezy Sunday morning. He takes “hip-hop live” to a whole new level. Check out this EXCLUSIVE footage of Talib and long time collaborator Hi-Tek putting it down last week in Austin, TX at SXSW to a live band and a packed house.

 
                                                   (video courtesy of Paul Stewart of Next-Thing)

I caught up with Talib and asked him ten simple questions. We chopped it up about the upcoming Reflection Eternal: Train of Thought II album -- one of the most anticipated albums of '09 -- Blacksmith artist Jean Grae, Strong Arm Steady, his collaboration with R&B singer Res, and the possibility of a Black Star Reunion.

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: K'naan

Posted by Amoebite, March 26, 2009 08:45pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

  

Day #10 - Artist #10 - K'naan:

Many famous musicians have come from hard times and rough backgrounds. Jay-Z grew up in the Marcy Housing Projects in Brooklyn, Kurt Kobain lived under a bridge for a time in Aberdeen, Washington, and K'naan grew up in the Wardhiigleey ("Lake of Blood") District in Mogadisho, Somalia. Sound familiar? Anyone seen the movie Blackhawk Down? Yeah, K'naan spent his childhood right in the middle of that violence and chaos.  His farther, being an intellectual, left for New York City to work and sent money back to Somalia to support his family. K'naan and his mother were able to get their exit visa approved on the last day the US embassy was open before the Somali government's collapse in 1991, and they boarded the last commercial flight out of the country. If I had to choose...I think I'd take the bridge in Aberdeen. (For more detail on his experience, click
here). 

Folies Art Nouveau

Posted by Whitmore, March 26, 2009 07:19pm | Post a Comment


Well, let the looting, pilfering and ransacking begin at Metro stations across the ville de Paris.
 
At Christies this week a cast-iron entrance rail to a Paris Metro stop from the early 1900’s sold for $27,500 at auction. The Art Nouveau remnant of the Paris subway system was originally expected to bring in only about $9,000.
 
Standing more than 4 feet high and almost 5 feet wide, more than 140 of these Metro guard rails were built around 1900. Though most have not survived, a few reside here and there and in museums around the world, including New York's Museum of Modern Art. There is actually only one complete surviving Art Nouveau edicule in the Paris Métro located at The Porte Dauphine station. All these entrance signs and railings and stations were created and designed by the architect Hector Guimard (1867 - 1942), who was also renowned for his design of the Pavilion of Electricity at the 1889 World's Fair in Paris and his 1913 design of the Synagogue de la rue Pavée à Paris.

Today Guimard is considered by many as the most prominent representative of the French Art Nouveau, but during his lifetime his fame and critical appreciation was short lived. By the onset of World War One his reputation and commissions had already started to fall by the wayside. By the time of his death in 1942 in New York, he had been forgotten. 
 
Christie's did not release the name of the winning bidder.

DARKMAN Saturday Midnight At The New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, March 26, 2009 01:04am | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!


Saturday March 28

Liam Neeson in
Sam Raimi's

DARKMAN

New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Midnight, All Tickets $7

April
April 4 Lobster Man From Mars
(20th Anniversary Screening! Director Stanley Sheff In Person!)

April 11 Eliminators
(Mandroid. Mercenary. Scientist. Ninja. Each one a specialist. Together they are ELIMINATORS!)

Friday April 17
The Alamo Drafthouse CINEMAPOCALYPSE!
http://cinemapocalypse.blogspot.com/

SURF II - 25th Anniversary!
7:30pm, One of the supreme party romps of the genre’s defining decade, here is a No Rules celluloid powerhouse that doubles as a 300-fisted beachfront avalanche of insanity! Honestly, this greatest-mohawked-surfer-zombie-comedy-ever-made is best summarized by writer/director Badat: “Menlo Schwartzer - the geekiest mad scientist of all - wants to rid the world of surfers by transforming them into garbage-ingesting zombie punks! But no way dude can he stop their most awesome party!” SURF II (no, there was not a SURF 1) packs more early ‘80s drive-in mania into one movie than even a brain in the final stages of rabies can handle. Drooling undead new wave boneheads, valley girls, electronically transgendered geekazoids in underwater fortresses, the guy who played everyone’s favorite corpse in WEEKEND AT BERNIE’S, spazztastic video game combat and an appearance from actor Fred Asparagus as “Fat Boy # 1”! Speaking of the stellar Z-caliber cast, this picture sports a career-best lead performance from Supreme Alpha Nerd Eddie Deezen, as well as surprise roles from Ruth Buzzi, Carol Wayne and BLAZING SADDLES’ Cleavon Little. Combine with the pogo-inducing soundtrack by Oingo Boingo and The Circle Jerks and you have the most entertaining IQ-remover The Video Age ever shat out! Totally retardular!!! (Zack Carlson)

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Friendly Fires

Posted by Amoebite, March 25, 2009 11:13pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth



Day #9 - Artist #9 - Friendly Fires:


Friendly Fires, from St Albans, England, first played together at age 14, under the name First Day Back. They parted ways to attend university and after returning in 2006, formed Friendly Fires. Over the next year they released a trio of EPs:  Photobooth, Cross the Line, and The Remix. Their first single "Paris," released at the end of 2007, was named "Single of the Week" by influential English publications The Guardian and NME (New Musical Express), and launched their career with appearances on Channel 4's (England) Transmission Program and (tastemaker English DJ) Zane Lowe's Radio 1.

This led to them supporting Interpol on a tour of the U.K. and numerous performances in the U.S., including opening for Bloc Party here in Los Angeles this past July. Their debut album, Friendly Fires, was released September 1, 2008 and the band just finished promoting the album on the NME Awards Tour 2009 with two of the hottest U.K. bands at the moment, and fellow Coachella 2009 newcomers, White Lies and Glasvegas

Win Tickets to an Exclusive DJ Set By Andy Bell of Erasure!

Posted by Amoebite, March 25, 2009 02:42pm | Post a Comment
Erasure's Andy Bell will be hitting the Amoeba Hollywood stage for a DJ set and signing on Tuesday, April 9th to celebrate the release of Erasure's new box set, which hits shelves on April 7th!

andy bell of erasure

And there's an extra special treat for all of you Andy fans:

By entering at the Amoeba website, you can win two passes to the very exclusive Andy Bell DJ set on Saturday, April 11th in Palm Springs as a part of this year's fabulous and renowned White Party! Along with tickets to Andy's poolside DJ set, you will also receive tickets to that evening's White Party events, which will include a never-before-seen, ultra special set by Lady Gaga! For all the details of our contest and instore, click here! And for White Party details and Saturday's lineup, click here!

andy bell

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Band of Horses

Posted by Amoebite, March 24, 2009 06:12pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

Coachella LineupBand of Horses

Day #8 - Artist #8 - Band of Horses:
Band of Horses
Sub Pop, the Seattle record label that threw kindling on the spark of Grunge music with early signings of Nirvana, Soundgarden, and Mudhoney in the late 1980s, deserves their own stage at this year's Coachella festival. With appearances from four of their artists, Fleet Foxes, Band of Horses, Blitzen Trapper, and No Age, toting some of the "buzzworthy-ist" albums of the past year, Sub Pop is still staying relevant in the indie rock world with 20+ years under their belt.

Among those in the Sub Pop fraternity, Band of Horses has the largest font size on this year's Coachella lineup. The Seattle-based band were first discovered and signed by Sub Pop while opening for future label-mate Iron & Wine during local area shows. Band of Horses released their debut album Everything All The Time in 2006 and grabbed attention with the standout track "The Funeral." They followed that up quickly with Cease to Begin in 2007. Again the band gained critical attention from songs "Is There a Ghost" and "No One's Gonna Love You," finding its way to many yeBand of Horsesar-end "Best of 2007" lists. This is the kind of band you can gain "indie-cred" from by introducing to your guy friends, and get just as many "sensitive-guy points" for putting it on a mixtape to impress that certain girl.

Fleeting and Forgotten Female Folkies

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 24, 2009 05:47pm | Post a Comment
Lately, whilst reading about unfamiliar folkies popping up on my Pandora folk station, I sometimes feel like I'm reading the same thing over and over when it comes to a handful of female artists. I doubt that the reasons were the same, but several new (to me) discoveries had similar careers involving under-recognized talent, followed by disappearance/retirment and then, several decades later, new interest. Among these chanteuses are:


Bridget St. John -- Bridget St. John learned guitar from John Martyn. St. John began touring the folk circuit and recording for the BBC and on John Peel's Dandelion label with members of Jethro Tull and King Crimson. In 1974, she recorded Jumble Queen and was voted the fifth most popular female singer in the Melody Maker readers' poll. In 1976, St. John moved to Greenwich Village and retired from music. She re-emerged in 1999 for a Nick Drake tribute concert and toured Japan in 2006.


Diane Hildebrand -- Hildebrand started out writing for Screen Gems alongside Boyce & Hart, Carole King & Gerry Goffin as well as other Brill Building alumni, including her frequent partner, Jack Keller. Together they wrote several songs for The Monkees as well as the theme to The Flying Nun. Whilst living in Beachwood Canyon, she signed a one record deal with Elektra, for whom she recorded her sole album, Early Morning Blues and Greens.

WOMEN IN HIP-HOP PART III: 1990 & 1991

Posted by Billyjam, March 24, 2009 11:39am | Post a Comment
The years 1990 and 1991 were pivotal for women in hip-hop and are captured in the series of videos below. Despite the uneven ratio between female and male artists, those two years captured a time when many more female emcees were being signed and promoted by major record labels than in previous years, or years since, for that matter.

It was also a time when just about every hip-hop crew or collective had at least one female member whom they gave full support to. Queen Latifah was part of the Flavor Unit. X-Clan's Blackwatch Movement included Isis and Queen Mother Rage, while the extended BDP crew included Ms Melodie and Harmony. Meanwhile, Yo-Yo had the backing support of the post-NWA Ice Cube.

The beginning of the 90's was also a time when sisters in rap looked out for one another and joined forces to throw some memorable all female hip-hop events. There was the 75 minute 1991 Sisters In The Name of Rap concert, with YoYo, Salt-N-Pepa, MC Lyte, Queen Latifah, Roxanne Shante, Def Dames, Silk Tymes Leather, Nikke? Nicole!, (dancehall artist) Shelly Thunder, Tam Tam & others and hosted by Dee Barnes. This killer show was a Pay-Per-View TV concert taped at the Ritz in NYC in late '91 and released the following year on VHS. (I still have my prized copy.) 

Also in 1991, on Valentine's Day, there was a 5-hour all female rap concert at the Los Angeles Sports Arena that included Queen Latifah, MC Lyte, Yo-Yo, M.C. Trouble (R.I.P.), Harmony, Nefertiti, Michie Mee, MC Smooth, and Nikki D. While, according to all reviews at the time, this female rap showcase was an off-the-hook event, its attendance figures were far from impressive. Only 3,700 people showed up at the 15,200-seat LA Sports Arena. Perhaps the promoters booked too large a venue for this event, but had it been an all male rap showcase featuring the leading men of rap of the day, it would have undoubtedly sold out.

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Yeah Yeah Yeahs

Posted by Amoebite, March 23, 2009 11:21pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

Coachella LineupYeah Yeah Yeahs

Day #7 - Artist #7 - Yeah Yeah Yeahs:

Yeah Yeah Yeahs
For some reason my internet wants to cut out on me every two minutes tonight, so this is going to have to be brief...which is good because sometimes actions speak louder than words. I didn't really have much to say about these guys, but I caught their new single "Zero" for the first time when I was up late one night working on this blog with MTV on in the background. Everyone says MTV doesn't play videos anymore --  well, they do. You just have to know where to look for them...like 3:00am.

YYY's have been off my radar for awhile, so I had no knowledge of a new release from them. As I was watching the video, I was unsure of what I was hearing. It looked like Karen O from the YYY's (who doesn't these days?), but it didn't quite sound like them. The YYY's have always sounded "black and white" to me. But this song sounded like "Blu-ray on a brand new Plasma screen!" And it's been on non-stop rotation on my iPod since. 

As my roommate and I were dissecting the Coachella lineup and planning our wish list of performances to catch, I had all but physically cut the YYY's off the flyer with a pair of scissors. But I think they just earned an extra man in the audience when they perform toward the top of the bill on Sunday April 19th. And I think that extra man will be me.
 

March 22, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, March 23, 2009 11:07pm | Post a Comment
I Love You Man ticket stub Mann Glendale Marketplace
Mann Glendale Marketplace

Mann Glendale Marketplace restroom

I Love You Man

Puma And Love-Made Present: What Do You Dance?

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 23, 2009 10:51pm | Post a Comment

Puma and Lovemade have collaborated to present a monthly series of events simply titled the “Puma Monthly Music Series.” For the inaugural event, a special celebration will take place at the Ecco Lounge in Hollywood tomorrow night, Tuesday, March 24, 2009. The two foward-thinking companies have joined to celebrating the launch of Whatdoyoudance.com, a social network dedicated to dance, lifestyle, fashion, art, events, and forward thinking from a dancer's perspective, of course. The new online network was created by dancer and choreographer extraordinaire Fatima Robinson. It is an interactive experience with a forum, an event section, blogs and much more for people to express what’s on their mind, or to simply share information with fellow users.

For this kickoff jam, Lovemade has done what they do best and organized a party reflecting the spirit of this newest venture from Fatima. Lovemade ladies have put together a great lineup of DJs including Rashida (America's Best Dance Crew/ Prince),  DJ Smiles Davis (Ameoba Records), Posso The DJ (Designer of Posso the Spat) and DJ Wendy City (Lovemade), all of whom will be providing the evening’s soundtrack, while Mark “The Cobrasnake” Hunter will be in the house capturing the action.

With that being said, be sure to look sharp, be prepared to boogie your heart out, and come celebrate the launch of “What Do You Dance?” with all of us!

out last week 3/10 & 3/17...white lies...cursive...bonnie prince billy...

Posted by Brad Schelden, March 23, 2009 07:30pm | Post a Comment
Sometimes I forget that bands still make videos. Back before I had MTV I was obsessed with videos and watched them whenever I got a chance. It was hard to find videos and you had to watch late night TV or be one of the lucky people with cable. It is now so easy to watch videos, but for some reason I watch them rarely. MTV doesn't really play videos anymore, but they are now so easily accessible on your phone and computer through YouTube. It is almost too easy. Maybe it is not as fun because it is so easy. Every once in a while I remember how easy it is and I easily spend hours catching up and watching videos. The next couple of weeks have some very exciting new releases. These last couple of weeks are also not so bad. New albums by Bonnie Prince Billy and Cursive and White Lies and Wavves and Tim Hecker. I also really like the new Handsome Furs. This blog is extremely short so you can spend some time watching some videos.

Here are some songs from the last couple of weeks of albums

Handsome Furs "I'm Confused" from the new album Face Control OUT NOW...



White Lies "Farewell to the Fairground" from the album To Lose My Life OUT NOW...



Cursive "Dorothy At Forty" from the album Mama I'm Swollen OUT NOW...

WHEN RAPPERS UNITED IN SONG: CLASSIC POSSE CUTS: 1988 - 1994

Posted by Billyjam, March 23, 2009 07:05pm | Post a Comment

"Posse cuts": the phenomenon whereby large collectives of rappers linked by crew, region, or, most often, by a common cause, all would get together to record a massive joint effort. Posse cuts were most popular circa '88 to '94-- coincidentally the same years as hip-hop's much lauded golden age.

These multiple emcee, pass-the-mic styled hip-hop songs date back to hip-hop's formative years (many of them freestyle sessions in the 1970's Boogie Down that were not even recorded and some that were, such as Afrika Bambaataa & the Soul Sonic Force's "Zulu Nation Throwdown" in 1980). It wasn't until the later 1980's that the posse cut came into its own. Below are the videos of seven of some of the best posse cuts from this six-year span -- all timeless, classic hip-hop recordings that I personally never tire of.

1988's Marley Marl-produced "The Symphony" by The Juice Crew not only put the posse cut format firmly on the rap map but it also remains one of the best singles in hip-hop history, period. On it, each contributor of the Queensbridge extended hip-hop family flows like water: Masta Ace, Craig G, Kool G Rap, and Big Daddy Kane -- all over a dope Marley Marl (known as "Dusty Marl" in the video below) track that samples Otis Redding. Note that this video is not the full album version as found on the 1988 Cold Chillin Marley Marl album In Control Volume 1.

The 1989 posse cut "Self Destruction" by the star studded Stop The Violence Movement was an even grander and more ambitious project in terms of the number of talented emcees that would bless the mic for this heartfelt anti-violence anthem that came about following a fatal fight that broke out during a Public Enemy/Boogie Down Productions concert. The tragedy inspired KRS-One to form the Stop the Violence Movement. After doing so, he co-produced a track with fellow BDP member D-Nice, enlisted some of the East Coast's best and recorded the single "Self Destruction" on Jive with all proceeds going to the National Urban League. The stellar lineup included KRS-One, Ms Melodie, D Nice, Chuck D, Flavor Flav, Kool Moe Dee, MC Lyte, Stetsasonic's Daddy O, Delite, Fruitkwan, Wise, Doug E Fresh, Just Ice, and Heavy D.

(Wherein we chance upon something Slick.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 23, 2009 06:16pm | Post a Comment
russian
Furvin Kryakutnoy, Russian inventor and possibly the inventor of the hot air balloon,
has nothing to do with this blog entry.

Here I am, again on my own. I can feel your pretty eyes on me, reading this, waiting to see what I have to say for myself. I am in the past – your past. By the time you read this, I will be gone. I will have scribbled my way through another witty and unnecessary blog.

But here in the past, dear reader, things do not seem so certain. I do not know, as yet (for example), what this entry will be about. Oh sure, it’s easy for you to scroll down the page and glean its general themes, but for someone like me who lives back in the time before this blog was written and done, all is mystery. All is uncertain. I do not even know who or what music or movies will first be mentioned.

Shall I leave it to chance? Shall I see what the Oracle that is YouTube has decided is an appropriate recommendation for me? (For those of you who don’t know, after you’ve used YouTube a bit, it begins to analyze what you tend to look for, then it offers suggestions of stuff you may enjoy, based on your history.) Here, then, is what YouTube thinks I will fancy:


…Huh.

…Well…

I’m not sure what to say. I can’t think of anything I’ve tried to find on YouTube that would justify this selection. Do they know something about me that I don’t? Some deeper insight unavailable to my conscious mind that only they, in their ability to collect and refine data, can provide?

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Morrissey

Posted by Amoebite, March 22, 2009 09:54pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

Coachella LineupMorrissey Keychain

Day #6 - Artist #6 - Morrissey:

The man, the myth, the legend, the Morrissey.

Talking about Morrissey is like talking about the Pope. It doesn't matter if I say something good or bad, I'm still going to piss somebody off. Great..now there's a third group of people I'm going to potentially piss off for comparing Morrissey to the Pope. No, I'm not comparing the two men to each other. The only similarity is that when talking about the two, one considers them either a deity or a joke. There's not much middle ground. So I'm going to be Morrissey's Switzerland. I will provide watches, cheese, chocolate and bank accounts...but no opinions.
Morrissey street art
But what I do want to mention is an interesting phenomenon that first introduced me to Morrissey. When I was in high school, my friends and I were jamming out to Metallica, Black Sabbath, Pantera, and Tool albums, so throwing on a Morrissey record was not much of an option. If I was caught with a Morrissey record in my zippered CD wallet (remember those?), I would have been excommunicated (no pun intended) from the group that hung out in the "D-Wing" at Fred C. Beyer High School. Because of that, I didn't discover Morrissey or the Smiths until a little later in life. 

Arthur Verocai @ The Luckman 3/15

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 22, 2009 09:32pm | Post a Comment

Arthur Verocai's
solo album from 1972 is a must have for everyone. It’s on my personal “Five albums that I would like to have with me on a desert island” list. Verocai’s recent performance on March 15, 2009 was his first ever in Los Angeles. To be honest, even for me, a big fan of Verocai’s music, and despite knowing that this might be a once in a lifetime chance to see this man perform, I almost skipped it. I have been disappointed by the past performances put together by Mochilla, a collection of artists and deejays responsible for bringing acts such as Mulatu Ashtake, Azymuth, Tony Allen and other tasty record geek namedrops to Los Angeles over the last few years. The artists are usually paired with Los Angeles based musicians, who are very talented but not always cohesive. The past performances relied on the musicians' ability to improvise rather than their ability to interpret the artist’s compositions. As a fan of the song, I felt that the songs got lost in the solos and improvisation.

However, on this night, everything was perfect. Verocai was backed by an impressive line-up of L.A and Brazilian musicians, including Mamao Conti from Azymuth, Carlos Dafe (a great and underated singer who sang on Verocai 1972 masterpiece) and Airto Moreira, who has played with Miles Davis, Return To Forever and Weather Report. Verocai’s compositions are, to me, part Gil Evans, part Brian Wilson and part Lo Borges. Each composition flowed smoothly, taking on a life beyond the original recordings. The result was an hour and a half of beautifully arranged Brazilian pop that had me wishing Milton Nacimento could get the same treatment the next time he comes to town. Verocai's strength comes not only from his compositions but also from his arrangements. This allowed the audience to witness the brilliance of both his music and the musicians backing him up. This was probably one of my favorite concerts in quite some time. His music was appreciated by fans and newcomers alike.

This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 22, 2009 06:23pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly!

The March / April calendar is now online:
www.NewBevCinema.com

March 24-31:
Legendary actor & cult movie icon Sid Haig will appear at the theater as we present some of his favorite movies as well as some of his own films.

Read the LA CityBeat article here.



Sunday & Monday March 22 & 23

Das Boot
(1981) The 1997-Released Director's Cut
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0082096/
dir. Wolfgang Petersen, starring Jürgen Prochnow
Sun: 5:00 only; Mon: 8:00 only

Sorry To Tell You This, But Old Age Begins at 27

Posted by Whitmore, March 22, 2009 02:16pm | Post a Comment
Yeah, you may look pretty good, maybe even damn near perfect … downright delicious, but I bet that chunk of gray pork in your head is already showing signs of some serious sluggishness, if not just complete, profound rot.
 
In a recent study of more than 2,000 people between the ages of 18 to 60 published in the latest edition of the journal Neurobiology of Aging, scientists found that on average cognitive abilities were best and sharpest at age 22. The study conducted at the Salthouse Cognitive Aging Lab at the University of Virginia has shown that cognitive abilities may decline much earlier than previously thought. Head of the study, Professor Timothy Salthouse, found indications that there was a marked decline in brain functions like reasoning, speed of thought and spatial visualization by the age of 27. Other tests also show memory performance begins faltering around 37 years of age. However, and this is slightly odd, the study finds that with more long term accumulated knowledge, vocabularies actually increased until about the age of 60. For example, my mom can say “you’re full of shit” in six different languages.

In Salthouse's study, participants were asked to solve puzzles, recall story details and spot patterns in letters and symbols -- similar testing is used to detect dementia. Salthouse states the difference between this study and comparable research is that other tests could not uncover signs of cognitive decline; older testing methods did not account for prior test experience. Common knowledge-type tests tend to give middle-aged participants an advantage.
 
Whew! This study eased many of my worries. In my youth I once showed some promise, but then in my late 20’s something inexplicably flattened my quasi-whiz kid, semi-demi-brilliant, slightly better then OK, B-minus intellect. Now I know I was just an innocent victim of natural brain chemistry decline … outstanding!

'BS' Doesn't Stand for 'Battlestar': Battlestar Galactica Finale

Posted by Charles Reece, March 22, 2009 12:44am | Post a Comment
spoiler alert.

You know how after a catastrophic accident or tragedy some religiously inclined individual looks at it as a miracle that something even worse didn't happen? Say, some burglar botches a job, not realizing the family is still home, and winds up murdering all of them except the young daughter he didn't see hiding in the closet. Afterwards, some bozo will inevitably suggest God's light must be shining down on the little girl, since she was so lucky to have survived. Maybe I'm a glass-half-empty kind of guy, but I'd say what's being conveniently ignored there is that her entire family was slaughtered, indicating there ain't anything moral giving much of a shit about her wellbeing. Or, if you don't like hypotheticals, take the Hulkster's use of Divine Intervention to comfort his son, Nick, during the latter's stay in jail for a drunken crash that rendered his "best friend" and passenger, John Graziano, a tomato:

Well, I don't know what type of person John was or what he did to get himself in this situation. I know he was pretty aggressive and used yell at people and used to do stuff. And for some reason God laid some heavy shit on that kid.  I don't know what he was into .... John was a negative person.

Forsooth, God's Will is deep and mysterious! So say we all! Thus, how might the 30 or so thousand survivors of Caprica find a little bit of meaning in their civiliation's destruction at the hands of the Cylons? Well, by realizing it's all part of God's plan (that is, the one, true God, not "the gods" the humans always swear by). See, with old Yahweh not being much of a utilitarian, it was necessary to kill so many to get a few to Earth, as a way to help our ancestors along in their development.  This is the Divine Scenarist's way of getting humanity to realize its full potential as what Caprica 6 refers to as another iteration of the civilization that gets too big for its britches and will destroy itself with nukes.

TK Label Gallery

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 22, 2009 12:01am | Post a Comment
dash records yellow label get off roxy lp labelt.k. records kc and the sunshine band custom labelalston records gold label betty wright
dash record label apa record label hot bushglades green label timmy thomas
foxy get off dash records bird labellester radio corporation records label b. baker chocolate co.glades record label latimore
anita ward songs of love juana records sky label designchimneyville record labelfrederick knight knight kap juana white label
peter brown a fantasy love affair drive record labelbobby caldwell clouds record labelmarlin disco party label
T.K. and its many subsidiaries were a very tangled web indeed. A huge player in the early disco scene, Henry Stone and co. burned out quick-- by 1980 they had to sell out to Morris Levy. I think my favorite design is the Chimneyville label; I really loved collecting these...
sunshine sound inner sleevet.k. disco 12" sleevemarlin records inner sleeve
jimmy bo horne goin' home for love sunshine sound record labelblowfly rapp dirty t.k. disco labelt.k. label purple and pink
jimmy reed is back roots record labeltk black rainbow label


Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Jenny Lewis

Posted by Amoebite, March 21, 2009 08:37pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth

 Jenny Lewis
Day #5 - Artist #5 - Jenny Lewis:
Jenny Lewis
To indie rock girls everywhere, she is an inspiration. To indie rock boys, she is an infatuation. Jenny Lewis has become the first lady of indie rock throughout the decade by being the go-to female vocalist for collabortations across the indie spectrum...and by being so damn cute!

The bulk of her accolades have come from fronting the band Rilo Kiley, her flagship musical endeavor that began with their 2001 debut album, Take-Offs and Landings. They've continued to record and tour recently with their fourth album and major label debut, Under the Blacklight, which came out in 2007.

Rilo Kiley - "The Moneymaker" from Under the Blacklight (2007):


Jenny's most well known musical collaboration is probaJenny Lewis Postal Service Albumbly the one she's least known for being a part of. She contributed backing vocals for most of the 2003 album Give Up by The Postal Service. According to Wikipedia, this side project by Death Cab For Cutie frontman Ben Gibbard and Jimmy Tamborello was the most successful selling album for legendary indie label Sup Pop since Nirvana's Bleach in 1989, selling over 900,000 copies. And keep in mind, this was still two years before Death Cab For Cutie blew up in the mainstream with their album Plans (2005).


Arp's Alexis Georgopoulos Chats

Posted by Miss Ess, March 21, 2009 06:15pm | Post a Comment
Alexis Georgopoulos has been a creative force in the San Francisco scene for many years, first making music with the band Tussle and then in his current incarnation, Arp. Arp's release In Light is a textural and warmth-exuding record that has added something new and welcome to the electronica section of Amoeba. Recently Alexis packed it up and moved to New York City where he plans to continue composing his balmy and atmospheric tunes while also working on a multitude of other projects, notably within the gallery scene there. Here, Alexis chats about those projects, his work in Arp, and also details what we can assume are just a few of his myriad influences and inspirations.

alexis georgeopoulos, arp

Miss Ess: How did you come up with your sound for Arp? What was your vision?


Alexis: After leaving Tussle, I started experimenting with analog synthesizers. Initally, Matthew Higgs (curator of White Columns gallery in Manhattan) asked if I'd do an installation for an exhibit he was putting together at New Langton Center for the Arts. When I learned it was a collaboration with an architect, I realized the music I'd justarp in light started making with analog synthesizers might work really well. So the first public Arp project, Cloud, was a modular room on wheels set up with a featherbed (just large enough for two people to lie down on or three to sit), two speakers and a few of my musical pieces on infinite repeat. I took the gallerists' sanity into consideration by picking pieces that I hoped could be heard again and again without driving them crazy.

R.I.P. NEW ORLEANS PIANO GREAT EDDIE BO

Posted by Billyjam, March 21, 2009 02:19pm | Post a Comment
eddie bo
Legendary New Orleans pianist, singer, songwriter and producer Eddie Bo (born Edwin Joseph Bocage) died of a heart attack on Wednesday. He was 79 years of age. One of the last great New Orleans piano professors, he was described by New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival producer Quint Davis as a "kind of a bridge between Professor Longhair and Allen Toussaint."

Known for an eclectic style that drew from jazz, funk, RnB, and rock 'n roll, Eddie Bo's 1962 hit "Check Mr. Popeye" inspired a dance craze at the time. Other notable hits by the incredibly prolific artist, who over the years released singles on a number of different record labels such as Ace, Ric, Apollo, Chess, and Bo Sound (his own imprint) included "Check Your Bucket" and "Hook and Sling," which was a Billboard Top 20 RnB hit in 1969.

The artist grew up in Algiers and the 9th Ward of New Orleans and graduated from Booker T. Washington eddie boHigh School followed by a stint in the US Army. Upon his return to New Orleans, he studied arranging and composing at the Grunewald School of Music, and soon after began his music career.

In addition to his own catalog and appearing (in recent decades) on albums with the Dirty Dozen Brass Band and George Porter Jr., Eddie Bo's music has been covered by many others, most notably Etta James, who had a hit in 1959 doing a cover of his song "Dearest Darling," and Little Richard, who adapted Bo's song "I'm Wise" to make it the song "Slippin' and Slidin." 

Manhunt

Posted by phil blankenship, March 21, 2009 11:49am | Post a Comment
Manhunt starring Henry Silva  Manhunt directed by Fernando Di Leo

Manhunt plot synopsis

Media Home Entertainment M769

Oh Bondage!

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 21, 2009 12:22am | Post a Comment
gregg diamond bionic boogie lp covercher prisioner lp coverdavid james holster chinese honeymoon lp cover
house of commons patriot lp coverpaul hyde & the payolas here's the world for ya lp coverheaven 17 penthouse and pavement 12" cover
nelson slater wild angel lp coveryvonne fair the bitch is black lp coverchi-chi favelas rock solid  cover
miracle help lp covermartin circus coverthe gimmicks high heels 10" cover

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Silversun Pickups

Posted by Amoebite, March 20, 2009 10:16pm | Post a Comment
127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

- By Scott Butterworth
 

Day #4 - Artist #4 - Silversun Pickups:


What is a Silversun Pickup anyways? I know a pickup is the part of an electric guitar that translates the vibration of the strings into an electrical signal, but  naming your band after an accentuated part of your intsrument? Sounds like an idea that was originated by a circle of hippies sitting on a hill. Why not name it "Mother of Pearl Rosette" ($20 to the person that gets that pop culture reference)?

Well, I learned what a silversun pick up is about four days after moving to Los Angeles this past July.  Before living in Los Angeles, I had alway heard about the famed indie/alternative music scene in LA's Silver Lake nieghborhood. So the first week in town, my roommate and I decided to check out the first night of Eagle Rock band Princeton's residency at Silver Lake Lounge's legendary Monday night up-and-comers showcase. Between bands we ran across the street to grab some food/drinks at the convenience store on the corner of Silver Lake and Sunset Boulevards. While crossing the street back to the show, I was informed that I had just completed my first "Silver-Sun Pickup." And my roommate went on to explain that the most recent band to break out of Silver Lake with their 2006 album Carnavas dubbed themselves Silversun Pickups from their late night beer-runs to the same Silversun Liquors that we refueled at that night, on the corner of Silver Lake's Silversun Pickups two major boulevards.

John Leech, rest in peace

Posted by Whitmore, March 20, 2009 10:00pm | Post a Comment
I’ve been sitting here all day trying to write something perfect.
 
I didn’t get much sleep. After I crawled out of bed on Thursday morning, out of nowhere, a heavy fog rolled in; but it made complete sense to me, it was more than a sign -- it was my destination. I was already there. The previous night I got the phone call I didn’t expect to receive for a while. I wasn’t at all prepared for the news: John Leech, the owner and founder of LA’s great arts hangout and bohemian cafe, The Onyx, had died.
 
John had no blood relatives, though he did leave behind a close knit extended family of former customers and employees who loved him as kin. I worked for John for some 14 years, and back then I saw him on a daily basis. Now that he’s gone I realize I needed to spend more time with him. Once the Onyx was closed in 1998, John retired and he started trekking across the US and Canada, often by train. Briefly John chased the idea of opening up another café, maybe here in LA or up in Portland, Oregon, but I think his renewed interest in travel got the best of those plans. While I bounced around the west coast, living for a while up in the Puget Sound, John was spending a lot of time in his cabin on the Russian River. I had excuses, but too many excuses. We’d get together for lunch or dinner every once in a while, but never as often as I wished we had now.
 
Though we were friends for some 26 years, there was so much I never knew about John. He was a man of many secrets. For example, I never knew his birthday. No one did. I once actually figured out how old he was; he laughed because he knew I’d forget it. I did. I swear with a wave of his hand the number vanished. John created a public space and even though he was the face of the Onyx, he was an incredibly private person.
 
John however, was truly an odd bird who stood out in the crowd of weirdly plumed eccentrics. Years ago he took to wearing Hawaiian shirts, but as the time went on he found it necessary to wear two, if not three shirts at the same time. My opinion may be a bit skewed, if not perfectly preposterous -- and why wouldn’t it be -- but only John could look so damned dapper wearing three Hawaiian shirts. No, he wasn’t batty, he just had a lot of Hawaiian shirts the world needed to experience. John was not exactly subtle but he did have an air of mystery about him. One part Bohemian, one part drill-sergeant, one part raconteur and muckraker, one part doting step-dad, he was a genuine man of the world. He hated bullshit, though a good bullshitter would be welcomed at his table. John had no patience for fools, but he knew when foolishness was a breath of fresh air. A few mediocre cups of coffee may have been poured at the Onyx now and then, but there was more pulsating life on that vibrant stretch of Vermont Ave than most any other part of Los Angeles during the 1980’s and 90’s. The cafe and the gallery next door was a genuine sanctuary from the volatile, irritating, confounding world outside. During the LA riots in 1992 John kept the Onyx open 24 hours a day so that the community had somewhere to gather and talk and be still. He believed in an unfettered creative experience, personal choice, personal responsibility, freedom of expression, the independence to live your life as you saw fit. And goddamn did he hate bureaucracy!
 
I would have to say John was not particularly blessed with many organizational skills -- trust me on that! -- somehow, either by luck, pluck or design, he created a home for hundreds of artists, musicians, writers and poets. The Onyx was a place where the odd, oddly beautiful or simply unconventional endeavors -- often excluded from the mainstream venues and galleries -- could find an audience and find a life. John’s support of the arts was an essential element of the café; he never took a percentage of the art sales and never charged at the door for music or theatrical performances. The bar-b-ques John concocted in the parking lot behind the Onyx and the champagne soaked art openings are legendary. We owe him so, so much; I am incredibly indebted to John. My life is so much better because of his efforts. At the Onyx I found life-long friends, direction, and most significantly, I met my wife there almost 18 years ago.
 
There is a votive memorial at the former Onyx location at 1802 N. Vermont Ave in front of what is now Cafe Figaro in Los Feliz. Another memorial is in front of the original Onyx location next to the Vista Theater at the Virgil Ave and Sunset Blvd intersection. Tributes can also be found on several sites on Facebook. There are tentative plans for a memorial service in late April or May.
 
John Leech in his own very peculiar way was a great man. He was a hell of a man, unique and one of a kind. People like John Leech don’t come down the pike every day; it’s a huge loss, I can’t even begin to explain it, I just can’t.
 
With our love, my love, rest in peace John.

Happy نوروز (Nowruz)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 20, 2009 08:26am | Post a Comment
HAPPY NEW YEAR!


Today, for most observers (but tomorrow for others), is Persian New Year, variously and roughly anglicized as Navrus (Tajikistan), Nawroz (Afghanistan), Nevruz Day (Albania), Nooruz (Iran), Nov Ruz Bairam (Kyrgyzstan), Nauryz Meyrami (Kazakhstan) and Novruz Bayram (Azerbaijan). As with the Lunar New Year, which is often referred to in the media as the "Chinese New Year" (unintentionally marginalizing Koreans, Taiwanese and Vietnamese, who also celebrate the Lunar New Year), Nowroz is often referred to as the Iranian or Persian New Year. In President Obama's Nowruz address, he didn't make that mistake, although he did turn it into a fairly contrived address to the Islamic Republic.


Maz Jorbani on Axis of Evil Comedy Tour

IRAN VS PERSIA

Iran, though related to Persia, is not the same thing. The word Iran comes from Aryānām, literally, "Land of the Aryans." Other Aryan people (who also celebrate Nowruz) include Baloch, Kurds, Lurs, Ossettians, Pashtuns and Zazas. Thus, Nowruz is widely celebrated (in addition to the places already named) in Balochistan, Bosnia, the Caucasus, the Crimea, Iraq, Kashmir, Kosovo, Kuwait, Lebanon, Macedonia, Syria, Turkey, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. The term "Iranian," in contrast to "Persian," includes all people descended from Iran who are just as fully Iranian (at least on paper, though not necessarily in practice) such as Arabs, Armenians, Georgians, Jews and Kazakhs, who are probably less likely to celebrate Nowruz. Though most of Nowruz's celebrants practice Islam, its origins go back much further and the day is especially important to Zoroastrians, as well as Alawites, Alevis, Bahá'í, Ismailis, and other Central Asian people of various faiths. 

Amoeba Music Weekly Hip-Hop Round Up 03:20:09 Eligh and Jo Wilkinson, T.I., E40, Roots Picnic, SxSW shows, Chess Federation vs Obama?, etc...

Posted by Billyjam, March 20, 2009 08:10am | Post a Comment
AMOEBA MUSIC HOLLYWOOD HIP-HOP TOP FIVE: 03:20:09
eligh and jo wilkinson
1) Eligh and Jo Wilkinson On Sacred Ground: Mother And Son (Legendary Music)

2) Scarab + Very present The Classic EP (Legendary Music)

3) Brother Ali The Truth Is Here (Rhymesayers Entertainment)

4) N.A.S.A. The Spirit Of Apollo (Anti)

5) T.I. Paper Trail (Atlantic)

Special thanks to Marques at the Hollywood Amoeba Music store for this week's Hip-Hop Top Five chart of the store's best selling new hip-hop albums. In the number one, with a bullet, slot is the new Legendary Music release from Eligh and Jo Wilkinson, On Sacred Ground: Mother And Son, whose impressive guest list includes Mark Bell, The Grouch, Pigeon John, Jiro Yamaguchi, Paul Dateh, Robert Miranda, Shanti Foster, and Slug of Atmosphere. Album highlights include "By And By" (feat. The Grouch & Paul Dateh), and "Honor Me" (feat. Pigeon John). Number two on the chart is a related release featuring Scarab (also of Living Legends fame) and Very of Us Pros, the duo known as Afro Classics, with the Classic EP. The EP includes scarab & very present the classic epsongs such as "Boom It," "The Follow Through," and "Live From Los Angeles Pt 1."

Trees For The Equinox

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 20, 2009 12:15am | Post a Comment

Cat Stevens Buddha and the Chocolate Box reord labelsouthland record labelchuck ragan record label
al hurrican mr. saxophone hurricane record labeldesire tree record label
bill gather trio impact record labelbonnie koloc record labelcure never enough palm tree record label
polkas con ernesto guerra del valle record labelpablo cruise part of the game record labelgeroge winston windham hill record label standard design
jimmy buffett coconut telegraph record labelaviva record labellinda waterfall windham hill records alternate label design
hickoids toxic shock cactus desgn labelnew mex record label

Ya Hoidz Me? - Talk About Bounce Music

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 20, 2009 12:01am | Post a Comment
Uptown New Orleans

For some reason, the Bounce scene, born nearly 20 years ago, seems to be undergoing a minor critical reassessment as it inspires curiosity in a new generation of fans amongst the young, the Euro, the old and new. I can only guess why. I suspect that part of it is a development of the ongoing, time-delayed, middle class fascination with vulgar, good-time booty, that, as with booty bass, gogo, ghettotech and juke house before, takes a little longer to catch on beyond the music's traditional base. Or perhaps it’s just the curiosity factor due to the prevalence of so many openly gay rappers, who have been the subject of articles in The Village Voice, The Guardian and The New York Times -- although their readers are unlikely to run out and buy the latest
Sissy Rap record. There was even a piece on Bounce for NPR’s stomach-turning attempt at hipness, What's the New What? ...Just the title of that show makes me feel like I've been kicked where it hurts.


On the other hand, sites like
Louisiana Rap, Nola Bounce and Twankle and Glisten have done a good job in documenting the scene and suggest a much deeper, more honest appreciation that makes me happy. I'll be honest, the idea of a politician claiming to like Bounce would make me die a little inside. Yet, I’d love it if all these underappreciated, undercredited artists who made Bounce happen got some well-deserved acknowledgment and attention. With films like Ya Heard Me documenting the scene and Youtubers like 1825 Tulane Ave and Whatheallman tirelessly keeping Bounce in your ear, I guess I can live with the idea that some ironic, comb-over-wearing member of the Dumpster Click is going to be into it too. Anyway, for the time being, if you look up "New Orleans Bounce" on Youtube, you're (currently, at least) unlikely to be confronted with the image an American Apparel/Vice Magazine disaster doing the Eddie Bow.

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: The Hold Steady

Posted by Amoebite, March 19, 2009 05:08pm | Post a Comment
30 Coachella Bands in 30 Days

127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

-By Scott Butterworth
   
 
Day #3 - Artist #3 - The Hold Steady:

I hate to start off with what I'm about to do, because I think the world of rock and roll journalism has no shortage of the cliche, metaphor-based music review, but it jumped out at me. I couldn't help it. You know, the kind of description like:  "(insert new awesome band)'s album sounds like the aftermath of a night out on the town, when the band is using the crosswalk at Abbey Road after leaving the pub, and is run down by a bus driven by Pink Floyd."

The Hold Steady - Stay PositiveWell, I'm going to do it anyways. When I first heard "Stay Positive," the title track off The Holdy Steady's 2008 album, I sensed something unique, yet so familiar, from the Brooklyn-based (by way of Minneapolis) band. The formula instantly popped into my head. Ready for this? I promise it's the only cheesy metaphor I'll be using. If Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band were constestants on the improv sketch show Whose Line is it Anyway and were told to sing a song in the style of the Dead Kennedys, ala Wanye Brady, we would get "Stay Positive."

JANIS JOPLIN DIED WAY TOO YOUNG

Posted by Billyjam, March 18, 2009 05:07pm | Post a Comment
  
Janis Joplin & friends partying on the Festival Express train
There is a tragically telling scene near the end of Festival Express, the 2003 rockumentary about the 1970 rock festival tour by train across Canada. In it, Janis Joplin is on stage with Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead between music and before the closing set by Joplin of the final date of the exciting railway tour that also included the Flying Burrito Brothers, The Band, Buddy Guy, and Sha Na Na. As much as it was a concert event, it was equally a traveling party, with one railway car ("the bar car" - as in video clip above) specifically set up for drinking and partying -- a place where Joplin apparently spent a fair amount of time. 

In the film's final scene, Joplin, whose legendary hard partying ways would lead to her death not too long after this very concert, is seen onstage and seems a bit buzzed but still functional. She proceeds to present the two main organizers of the unique railway traveling rock tour, Ken Walker and Thor Eaton, with a heartfelt, two-part thank you gift. She first presents them with a model train "to remember" the tour, and then, smiling widely, presents them with a case of tequila "to continue" the party. In return they gave Joplin a gift of her favorite poison, a bottle of Southern Comfort, which obviously pleased the singer, who passed it off stage for safekeeping and proceeded to jump into an inspired rendition of "Tell Mama."

Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: MSTRKRFT

Posted by Amoebite, March 18, 2009 02:00pm | Post a Comment
30 Coachella Bands Featured in 30 Days

127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

-By Scott Butterworth
MSTRKRFT
Day #2 - Artist #2 - MSTRKRFT

There comes a time in every boy’s life when he spreads his wings and becomes a man. For me it was moving from Northern California (Modesto) to San Diego to attend San Diego State University in the Fall of 2002. Moving away from home for college is a coming of age ritual that many in this country are familiar with. But as soon as you get to San Diego State, you realize there is a more highly celebrated coming of age ritual looming ahead of you: the fifteen minute drive south across the border (often by party bus) to Tijuana, Mexico, to take part in whatever it is that you’re not old enough to do in the U.S. But for me, my first trip to “TJ” wasn’t the usual first weekend of Freshmen year as a reaction to newfound freedom away from the parents. My first venture across the border was toward the end of college (late 2006, I think?) when my friends and I were hungry for some legendary TJ tacos and heard about a few local San Diego bands and DJs doing a show in TJ one weekend, headlined by something or someone called MSTRKRFT. I was a little nervous heading across the border for the first time, but my friends were self proclaimed “regulars,” so they promised “everything will be just fine."

St Patrick's Day Hangover

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 18, 2009 01:12am | Post a Comment
kool moe dee african pride coverdennis day my wild irish rose lp coverla fronteriza la vibora lp cover
michael jarrett we're all goin' down together lp covermike "jessie" owens, charles mcgee, paddy noonan at abbey tavern lp coversteve hillage green lp cover
jaki graham lp covermike "jessie" owens, charles mcgee, paddy noonan at abbey tavern back coverkate smith may god be with you lp cover
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Coachella 2009 30/30 Initiative: Henry Rollins

Posted by Amoebite, March 17, 2009 07:53pm | Post a Comment
30 Coachella Bands Featured in 30 Days

127 Bands, 5 Stages, 3 Days and 1 Mean Sunburn.

"Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival - April 17-19th, 2009 or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Find 30 Reasons To Love a Weekend in the Desert."

-By Scott Butterworth

     
Day #1 - Artist #1 - Henry Rollins:

“I know that I know him, but I don’t know how I know him.” This is the response I got a couple weeks ago while I was rattling off a whole list of bands/artists, trying to convince my roommate to skip a weekend of his usual non-stop studying for medical school (I mean, where is that going to get you in life anyway?) and join me for the weekend at the Coachella Festival in Indio this April. He made the above statement when I emphasized how excited I was to see Henry Rollins. In the past, I’ve found myself saying the same thing about a number of artists, before my phase of being a self-proclaimed/admitted complete music nerd (which I make no apologies about currently being at the height of). There were many artists that I knew that I was supposed to know…but I just didn’t know why. Some might even say that there were many artists "that wanted me to want them…that needed me to need them," and in fact, I passed up going to many years of Coachella festivals because I simply didn’t have the age, the life experience, a job at a record store, or an older brother to steal records from, to realize the musical, cultural and historical significance of the many artists that have graced the stages of Coachella since 1999.

THE LEP IN THE HOOD: SO BAD IT'S GOOD

Posted by Billyjam, March 17, 2009 06:15pm | Post a Comment

Since it is Paddy's Day I want to nominate the best/worst Irish themed movie ever made: Leprechaun In The Hood. Directed by Rob Spera, the flim stars recurring Leprechaun lead Warwick Davis as the evil Leprechaun, or "Lep" as he is known, along with a cast that includes Ice T (as the pimp Mack Daddy O'Nassas), Coolio (as himself) and as the wanna be rappers Postmaster P. Stray Bullet, and Butch, Anthony Montgomery,  Rashaan Nall and Red Grant respectively.

The loose storyline of this Doug Hall penned rap-themed action/horror/comedy is that Lep ends up in the hood of Compton, CA where he has been awakened from his deep sleep (big mistake) by Ice T and announces "Death to he who sets a Leprechaun free. Steal his gold, it will corrupt your soul, you see. For many a moon the legend has grown, death toll increases, solution unknown. Beware the evil wanderer in search of his loot, lest you suffer the wrath of his golden flute. Flee while you can, the future's not good-- for no one is safe from a Lep in the Hood!"

Made in 2000, Leprechaun In The Hood is one of those movies that it is so awfully bad that it's actually good, or at least hella entertaining to watch, or half-watch as you do other tasks, or after a few pints of Guinness. It is the fifth installment in the Leprechaun B-movie series, which also includes such far-from-classy episodes as Leprechaun 4 in Space, but this one succeeds because it is so ridiculously funny, unintentionally so at times. 

Best scenes include towards the closing when little Lep does his rap ("Lep in the hood come to no good") surrounded by zombie hotties, and the scene in which Lep gets blunted in the bathroom with Ice T and, in his ridiculously over the top thick stage-Irish accent, utters his best line in the film: "A friend with weed is a friend indeed."

What Do You Dance?

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 17, 2009 11:31am | Post a Comment

Ever heard a record that made you want to get down like this little kid? The first record I ever bought on vinyl was Michael Jackson’s Off the Wall. I was 10, it was 1994 and the record was still bumping on the radio fifteen years after its original release. New, old, fresh, or dusty, the music got to me, put me in a mood I was unable to describe at the time. My mother had never seen me so intoxicatingly excited about anything before; she didn’t really know how to react. She worked hard with a no nonsense policy always enforced around the house. She gave me the money I asked for to get the record just to get me out of the house. “Now go on outside and play and stop pestering me,” she barked after slapping the dough in the palm of my hand. Out I went. After buying the record and enough candy to last me ‘till the end of time, I raced my bike across town – a very small town -- as fast as I could to my grandparents’ house, where I retreated to the basement for some serious privacy. My grandfather, who used to own a record store, had a lonely turntable set up at the end of the long, terribly lit basement for special occasions just like this. I got my boogie on for a couple hours, doped up on food coloring and high-fructose corn syrup, poor lighting and all.

It wasn’t long before music got to me the same way the youngest member of the Jackson 5 did. In 1995, just one year after my first magical music moment, I discovered Prince. My cousin let me borrow 1999 on cassette with the promise I return it promptly. 9 months and 101 excuses later, she was forced to steal it back from me. Prince was my forbidden fruit. Never listened to him out loud, always played him in my Walkman for fear my mother would forbid me from listening to it. I’ll admit, the vulgarity and promiscuity that Prince exudes is a bit much for any 11-year-old, but like Michael Jackson, all I ever wanted to do was dance. I had to listen to music that made me want to move, shimmy and shake ‘till the exhaustion kicked in and forced me to call it quits. Lyrics be damned-- I didn’t understand what the heck they were talking about anyway, it was gibberish to me. It was about the beat, the rhythm, and the evoked emotion.

"AMERICAN" MOVIES: PART I

Posted by Billyjam, March 16, 2009 08:29pm | Post a Comment
american psycho
This Amoeblog rates ten films with "American" in the title (most of which should be readily available on DVD at Amoeba). It seems that just having the word "American" in the title of a film is an instant attention grabber and gives said movie a certain cache or a slight air of importance.

Of course, the movie has to be worthy of this attention and not all "American" films are. Here's a random list of Top Ten "American" Movies -- by no means all inclusive or comprehensive, but ten that I have viewed and have opinions about. I've listed them in order of favoritism. Please feel free to add your favorite or most hated "American" movies in the COMMENTS below. And check back for a future Amoeblog on "American" Music -- songs or albums with "American" in the title.

1) American Psycho (2000)
Whether you consider this film dark comedy at its darkest or a just plain psycho violent movie, this is nonetheless a brilliant piece of work and, in my opinion, the greatest performance of Christian Bale's career. Directed by Mary Harron, it was adapted from Bret Easton Ellis's controversial novel of the same name. The film stars Bale as its materialistic central character, Patrick Bateman, who is supported by a strong cast that includes Jared Leto, Josh Lucas, Justin Theroux, Bill Sage, Chloë Sevigny, Reese Witherspoon, Willem Dafoe, and Samantha Mathis.
american movie
Among my favorite scenes in the movie are the two in which Bale as the narcissistic Bateman character (which he plays to perfection -- perhaps tapping into his inner anger/violent issues) critically dissects the music of Phil Collins and Huey Lewis & The News. So graphic were the sex and violence in one scene of this film that for the edited DVD version and R-rated cinematic version of the film in the US a third of minute of footage was deleted.

Women of the Western

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 16, 2009 06:48pm | Post a Comment
 

Ever since the dawn of film theory, film critics have loved to talk about the Western; probaby because its engagement with formula and its psychological subtext are so obvious, so close to the surface, that it's like kicking gravel and striking oil. For example, the genre bears a similarity to tales of knights errant, who similarly were bound by codes of honor and used strength and wit to defeat malevolence, &c &c &c... Part of what makes the Western attractive for film theorists is the way it shifts and evolves too -- spiraling off subgenres like Curry Westerns, Northerns, Oesterns, Red Westerns ands Spaghetti Westerns -- and engages other genres like samurai films and noir. But whereas a little bit of research turns up several scholarly works addressing women's place in the Western, I haven't been able to find any that focus on female-centric Westerns, nor been able to uncover a clever or cutesy name for the subgenre. When I started this blog, I thought I'd come up with a tiny handful, but was quickly surprised at how many Westerns feature females in roles of central importance.

   
Real women of the west. washing clothes (left), famous madame Chicago Joe (center), bandit Belle Starr (right)

To be sure, the Wild West was, in fact, a male-dominated place. Of course, there were women too who, just like their male counterparts, were probably more likely to run a ranch or work in town than to find work as gunslingers, bandits and bounty hunters... although there were those too. The National Cowgirl Museum Hall of Fame has, since its founding, sought to better document the contributions of women in the west. Although women in Westerns generally seem to symbolize civilization/the east, making cowboys uneasy with their use of risque talk and their attempts to transport urban conventions to an untamed land, in real life, that role would've been impractical and probably abandoned pretty quickly. When there's work to be done, propriety and traditional societal constructions would just get in the way. In fact, in Wyoming, for example, women gained the right to vote in 1869, over 40 years before the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. The photographs of Evelyn Cameron depict no-nonsense women who have little in common with the dippy, ditzy cowgirls of Gil Elvgren's art or Hollywood cowgirls. Of course, I'm not suggesting that Hollywood is in the business of portraying reality, but it's interesting to look at the decisions they make when constructing mythology.

(In which we consider Peaches considering Joni Mitchell.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 16, 2009 06:40pm | Post a Comment
fruit
This has been a busy week, dear readers. Lots of phone interviews, dinner parties, and soundtrack-slinging at Ye Olde Amoeba Music Hollywood.

I was gabbing with Peaches about her new album last Wednesday. It’s called I Feel Cream (release date in the U.S. is May 5) and it’s a blast! Definitely a departure from its predecessors, in that it’s more diverse in sound and moods. Peaches sings a lot more. There are moments where it sounds like the lovechild of modern R&B and older tracks by darlings of the Industrial genre, Front 242.

peaches i feel cream

Anyway, I asked her about musical influences that might surprise people (it’s already well documented that she loves hip-hop and rock ‘n’ roll). This led to her gushing about Joni Mitchell, and this performance in particular, which rocked her world:


That voice! A miracle. I just can’t get enough of it…


She really is one of my favorite things in the world of music, and while not everyone shares my passion for her sound, anyone who appreciates songwriting as a craft must acknowledge that, as a writer of music and lyrics, she remains one of the greatest artists of modern pop music. She’s credited with inventing about 50 different guitar tunings, and the list of musicians who cite her as an influence – Peaches included – reads like a Who’s Who of music.

Price Tag Gallery

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 16, 2009 12:20am | Post a Comment








This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 15, 2009 05:22pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly!

The March / April calendar is now online:
www.NewBevCinema.com

Printed calendars are here - Help spread the word - pick one up for yourself and a few for your friends!


Sunday,Monday & Tuesday March 15, 16, 17

Ashes Of Time Redux
(1994/2008)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0109688/
dir. Wong Kar Wai, starring Maggie Cheung, Tony Leung, Leslie Cheung, Brigitte Lin, Jacky Cheung
Sun: 3:20 & 7:30; Mon/Tue: 7:30

Once Upon A Time In China
(1991)

http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0103285/
dir. Tsui Hark, starring Jet Li, Biao Yuen, Rosamund Kwan, Jacky Cheung
Sun: 5:15 & 9:25; Mon/Tue: 9:25


Happy Birthday Cecil Taylor

Posted by Whitmore, March 15, 2009 01:31pm | Post a Comment

Sometime in my mid-teens I started reading about this mad pianist; how his flying elbows and insane musical gyrations splintered keyboards, whose uncompromising musical destination was one part tsunami, one part Armageddon. I was actually warned about Cecil Taylor by a music teacher of mine, "It isn’t really music … it's ugly … beating the hell out of a keyboard isn’t musical.” My classical guitar teacher also went so far as to bring god and the devil into the conversation; you would have thought I was asking for directions to the crossroads. 
 
I eventually made my way over to Platterpuss Records on Hollywood Blvd near Vermont Ave and with some change stolen from my mom’s piggy bank I bought an old used copy of Taylor’s 1966 album Unit Structures. I ran back home and threw the LP on my ridiculously crappy turntable with the flashing color pin-wheels and as predicted … the music scared the holy shit out of me. Except for one thing-- although I understood little of what was going on, I was mesmerized. Later I heard beyond the chaos and ferocity, and began getting clued in to improvisation, tone clusters, polyrhythms and all the other intricacies layered in Cecil Taylor’s music, like spirituality, a sense of history and oddly enough -- and contrary to my teachers' way of thinking -- beauty. A couple of weeks later I traded in a bunch of pop records at Joe’s Records on Hyperion Blvd and bought a used copy of Conquistador. From that point on I had a significantly different take on music. Happy birthday Cecil Taylor!
 
“Practice, to be studious at the instrument, as well as looking at a bridge, or dancing, or writing a poem, or reading, or attempting to make your home more beautiful. What goes into an improvisation is what goes into one's preparation, then allowing the prepared senses to execute at the highest level devoid of psychological or logical interference. You ask, without logic, where does the form come from? It seems something that may be forgotten is that as we begin our day and proceed through it there is a form in existence that we create out of, that the day and night itself is for. And what we choose to vary in the daily routine provides in itself the fresh building blocks to construct a living form which is easily translated into a specific act of making a musical composition.” - Cecil Taylor


Watchmen (2009): Some Arguments about Design

Posted by Charles Reece, March 14, 2009 11:32pm | Post a Comment

The Impotent God Snake

I love discussing issues of time in comics and film, so Zack Snyder's Watchmen makes for a good opportunity to reflect on its relation to both media. I'll be returning to this sometime in the future. For now, I'm going to stick to a few problems with Alan Moore's conception of Doc Manhattan that the movie doesn't do much to improve on. There is one improvement, though, namely the Mjölner-sized hammer he has hanging between his legs, befitting a puny scientist resurrected as a god. Dave Gibbons merely gave him the statistical average. The Doc can create anything from anything else -- perhaps ex nihilo, if you believe in miracles -- and exists in all points in time simultaneously. One can't get more virile than absolute mastery of matter. However, even though he can still sexually please his woman, he's ontologically impotent-- everything already existing as it was/is/will be, independent of his will. His control of matter is constrained by the deterministic course of the world. Thus, the fact that we never get to see the hammer of the gods raised on camera is a telling sign of his lot in existence (as well as the failure of our last, best chance to see expensive CGI-porn). While Doc's attending the Comedian's funeral, he's shown to exist in Vietnam, where the latter murders a girl who's pregnant with this child. The girl, like the Comedian, is already dead to Doc, so he stands by flaccidly and "lets" the murder occur. When Doc voices concern, he gets a moral lecture from the most nihilistic of the bunch:

Lovelines

Posted by phil blankenship, March 14, 2009 11:09pm | Post a Comment
Lovelines starring Michael Winslow  Lovelines starring Greg Bradford

Lovelines plot synopsis

Key Video 6861

Women's history documentaries

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 14, 2009 10:19am | Post a Comment









              

Elliott Smith's Strange Parallel

Posted by Miss Ess, March 13, 2009 06:10pm | Post a Comment
elliott smith

Elliott Smith
remains unquestionably one of my favorite songwriters of all time, though I don't listen to him much these days.
elliott smith strange parallel
Way back in 1998, when I did not live in a major city and was just barely in college, I somehow felt like I was the only person in the world listening to Elliott Smith. This was before Hot Topic, just before emo went mainstream, and before irony had so massively elliott smith robot handcrushed sincerity in an epic battle of wits. In these early-ish days of the internet, I managed to contact someone through a fansite and get my hands on a tape of a film about Elliott, Strange Parallel, made by the idiosyncratic Steve Hanft. I don't think I had ever seen footage of Elliott at the time.

When I put the tape in my VCR and the film unfolded before me, I remember laughing aloud all by myself at the sight of it: I was completely overwhelmed by the fact that there was Elliott, live and onscreen, wearing his Bocephus shirt and digging a hole in the woods, out of which came a guitar. In my isolation, I somehow felt like he and Steve had made this film just for me. It was stunning. At the same time, I also was tickled by the greater idea that someone had made this film, thinking that many other people would watch and enjoy it -- who were these people?! This film pointed the way toward the world beyond just myself, a world of people who maybe thought a least a little like me, especially when it came to music. I would eventually have to move to San Francisco to find them en masse.
elliott smith
Strange Parallel clearly shows Elliott's genius and highlights his sense of humor as well. I think it is one of my favorite things ever. In the 10 years since this film was made, information and odd, detached connections are so much more quickly at our fingertips, and Smith has gained noteriety for so many things, mostly and unfotunately outside his music, but perhaps this footage and the songs within it will be a revelation for you as well.

AMOEBA MUSIC WEEKLY HIP-HOP ROUND UP 03:13:09

Posted by Billyjam, March 13, 2009 05:47pm | Post a Comment
AMOEBA MUSIC SAN FRANCISCO HIP-HOP TOP FIVE: 03:13:09
brother ali
1) Brother Ali The Truth Is Here (Rhymesayers CD & DVD)

2)
Keeley & Zaire Ridin High (WYXMusicLabel)

3)
Camp Lo Stone and Rob Caught on Tape (Soulfever Inc.)

4) Messy Marv Cake & Ice Cream Mixtape Vol. 2 (SIccness)

5) K'NAAN Troubadour (A&M/Octone Records)

Thanks to Luis at Amoeba Music San Francisco for this week's Hip-Hop Top Five of new hip-hop sellers with the Rhymesayers' Brother Ali in the top slot. His latest CD & DVD combo pack The Truth Is Here is a nine track CD plus a full-length DVD. The first official release in two years from the mid west emcee since he dropped his acclaimed The Undisputed Truth is meant to tide fans over until his official full-length album (producamp loced by Ant of Atmosphere fame) drops in the Fall.

The nine tracks on The Truth Is Here include two sought after Brother Ali B-sides plus seven new & previously unreleased songs including the stellar track "Philistine David" and also "The Believer" -- a collaboration with Slug from Atmosphere. Meanwhile, the full length DVD part of the new package is concert footage of the artist's sold-out homecoming performance on June 7th, 2007 during The Undisputed Truth Tour at Minneapolis' First Avenue nightclub, as well as interviews, the music videos for "Take Me Home" and "Uncle Sam Goddamn," plus commentary by the artist himself.

The unsung heroines of Punk/Post-Punk/No Wave/New Wave

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 13, 2009 05:46pm | Post a Comment
Since its beginning, rock music has been a male dominated affair. Women, such as Wanda Jackson, were not just anomalies but curiosities. By the '60s there were plenty of girl groups, female soul singers and a few female-fronted rock bands, but the few actually female-dominated rock bands like Ace of Cups, Fanny, The Girls, Goldie & the Gingerbreads (the first all female rock band to sign to a major label) and even the Shaggs aren't exactly household names. That seemed to change in the '70s, when Suzi Quattro and The Runaways seemed to lessen the shock of seeing girls wielding instruments. Whether he was joking or not, Roger Ebert took credit for the girl rock revolution by creating the Carrie Nations in his screenplay for Beyond the Valley of the Dolls. Things really began to change with onset of the new wave of the late '70s. Not only were there female-fronted bands like Siouxise & the Banshees and Blondie, but there were also bands integrated in various ways, like Talking Heads and later The Mekons, Gang of Four, &c. Now, although you could still listen to the radio for a year without hearing an all-female rock band, it's not entirely out of the question. These bands aren't all entirely comprised of women, but they definitely broke the mold.


The Au Pairs "Come Again"


The Bloods "Button Up" (audio only)

Alela Diane Chats

Posted by Miss Ess, March 13, 2009 02:28pm | Post a Comment
Nevada City native Alela Diane has already made quite a splash with her just-released album, To Be Still. The record was released on her new label, Rough Trade Records and she was written up in the illustrious Mojo as one to watch in 2009. Alela's music sounds fresh and true and it rings with evocative references to nature, life and love. Her voice commands attention with its bold and warbling tones and her songs intertwine tales of days new and old. To read my review of Alela's album, click here, and for images from her Amoeba instore back in 2007, click here. For our recent chat, read on.

alela diane

Miss Ess: Was there a lightning bolt moment when you were young and you realized how important music was for you? What albums/artists were important to you during that time?

Alela Diane: I think I always knew I loved song and melody. I remember being small and hearing my dad’s guitar through the wall as I fell asleep. I’d crash out on random couches as my folks finished up band practice. I remember listening to Patsy Cline with my mom, singing along… always singing along. As I got older I alela diane performingbranched out into more ‘popular’ music of the time and went through my preteen obsession with Hanson: I was not completely sheltered from pop culture, as it turns out. I began to write songs & play the guitar at 19. And shortly thereafter, when I was working at a breakfast café in Nevada City, I realized I was a lot better at singing than I was at filling water and coffee-- so I stuck to it. 

Belong's October Language: 2006 treasure of static and buzz

Posted by J. Mark Beaver, March 13, 2009 02:07pm | Post a Comment
belong october language
I get a strange thrill out of stumbling upon albums that sound exactly like what their cover suggests -- in this case, the ancient decaying photo of a pioneer-era buiding, probably from Belong's hometown of New Orleans; the spaces where the color saturates and the many spots where all color and image have been wiped away by time and the elements. October Language is the aural equivalent.

Compared to electronic frontiersmen like Fennesz and William Basinski, Belong (composed, for this recording, of conspirators Turk Dietrich and Michael Jones) make sounds that seem to be in the process of disappearing even as they first appear. The opening track, "I Never Lose. Never Really." begins with a tone like hearing an orchestra muted through the walls of a building, as if the swelling adagio would come through crystal clear if someone would just open the right door. Then it all begins to descend beneath an increasing tide of swirling static.

I find the whole album to be, essentially, meditational. There is a profound silence at the center of it, not unlike modern classical compositions by the likes of Arvo Part, Toru Takemitsu or Henryk Gorecki. The focus on electronics and instruments more often associated with Rock makes October Language more immediately reminiscent of My Bloody Valentine's Loveless than anything within the Classical tradition.

There are very few vocal tones on the album, another factor that pulls it away from the Rock genre, and the pure focus on the build and wane of the sound and atmosphere places it among my favorite listens of the last few years.

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater & My Mother Turn 50

Posted by Amoebite, March 13, 2009 01:28pm | Post a Comment
The two most important things in my life have always been, and will always be, the gift of movement and my relationship with my mother. I started dancing 23 years ago at a small studio in Albuquerque, NM. My grandmother worked at the local telephone company and, as fate would have it, the nearest day care center was not actually a day care center, but instead a dance studio. The rest, as they say, is history.
Ailey Dancer
Dance has shaped and moved my life in such a way that it has become my artistic expression, my creative outlet, and my identity. I’ve always known that dance would remain a huge part of my life regardless of what I chose to do with it professionally. My mother has always supported my decision to be deeply involved in the arts, as well as anything else I’ve put my mind to.

Growing up in Albuquerque, there wasn’t much room for diversity in the dance world. Often I was left feeling like the odd one out because of my body type and ethnicity. I was told I was too muscular to become a dancer during my formative years but, because of my mother’s unwavering faith in me, I continued to pursue my dream as a dancer, regardless of what others tried to tell me.

It wasn’t until I was 13 that I became familiar with the New York modern-based dance company, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. For the first time, I felt enlightened seeing a group of 30 dancers, with all different body typesAiley Dancers and ethnicities, coming together to share their gift of movement. It was like a breath of fresh air and validated my existence in the dance world. They gave me faith and because of them, I realized that my hopes for becoming a professional dancer were not merely dreams and out-of-reach goals, but were there for the taking.

Future Hunters

Posted by phil blankenship, March 12, 2009 10:45pm | Post a Comment
Future Hunters directed by Cirio H Santiago  Future Hunters starring Robert Patrick

Future Hunters

Future Hunters

Vestron Video 4510

RAPPERS: THE WEAKEST, THE WORST, THE OLDEST, & THE YOUNGEST

Posted by Billyjam, March 12, 2009 08:10pm | Post a Comment
Below are four entertaining videos that cover extremes in rap: the weakest, the worst, the oldest & the youngest. The first one is a clip from the forgotten gem of an episiode of NBC TV show The Weakest Link from 2002 when it adapted a rap theme to determine who was the weakest rapper. On the show from seven years ago, host Anne Robinson had, it seemed, almost as much fun with her contestants (Young MC, Xzibit, B-Real, Da Brat, DJ Quik, Nate Dogg, Jermaine Dupri & Rev Run) as "Miss Katie" Couric recently did interviewing Lil Wayne.

The World's Worst Rapper? (Up for debate of course since there are probably worse.) The clip below features no-talent emcee Stephen from Sheffield and is from the 2006 preliminaries of UK's The X-Factor with judges Simon Cowell, Sharon Osborne, and Louis Walsh -- all of whom weren't feeling Stephen's flow. 

The World's Oldest Rapper video clip features Herb Jeffries rapping at 95 years old. And the World's Youngest Rapper clip is of Bobby J, who is actually not the youngest rapper. I think he is about 4 and a half or five in this clip, and there are many younger rappers out there. But of the numerous 3  year olds I have seen/heard, none come close in style and flow to lil Bobby J. And anyways, this Amoeblog is more about fun than anything else. So just enjoy!


The Weakest Rapper

Samantha Bumgarner -- fiddling ballad woman of mountains

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 12, 2009 06:49pm | Post a Comment
Aunt Samantha Bumgarner c. 1937

Aunt Samantha Bumgarner (née Biddix) was a fiddle and banjo player from North Carolina who, in 1924, became the first woman to record hillbilly music. In doing so, she opened the doors for all the great female hillbilly and country musicians who followed. Imagine for a second a world without Brenda Lee, Iris Dement, Jean Shepard, Loretta Lynn, Patsy Cline, Norma Jean, Skeeter Davis, Sue Thompson and Tammy Wynette, to name a few. Not a pretty place.

Dillsboro, North Carolina c. 1904
 

Samantha Biddix was born in Dillsboro, North Carolina on Halloween, 1878, the same year Black Bart held up his last stagecoach and, more relevantly, Thomas Edison patented the phonograph. Her parents were Has Biddix, himself a fiddler, and Sara MaLynda Brown Biddix. Though Biddix showed an early interest in music, her father wouldn’t allow her to touch the fiddle, an instrument occasionally referred to by hillbillies as a “devil’s box.” Nonetheless, when he wasn’t around, she played it and displayed a natural talent. The banjo, then viewed as a slightly more acceptable instrument for women, was not forbidden and Biddix’s first, constructed from gourd and cat hide, was presented to her at fifteen. Later, having demonstrated her skills for her father, he bought her a ten cent model and allowed her to perform with him in the area. Ultimately, he consented to her entering a banjo competition in Canton and she won. Gaining confidence, she began entering and winning competitions routinely.

English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians

When she married Carse Bumgarner in 1902, he gave her her first fiddle but she remained most acclaimed for her banjo playing. A few years later she acquired the nickname "Aunt Samantha." Although through the lens of modern ignorance, a hillbilly woman gaining fame with the banjo may seem completely out of the ordinary, it was actually fairly common for women to play the instrument, especially amongst hillbillies. In 1916, when Cecil Sharp and Maud Karpeles began field recording in the upper south, nearly three quarters of the hundreds of tunes they compiled as English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians were performed by women. In addition, many famous male hillbillies learned to play from the women in their lives. Ralph Stanley was taught to play by his mother, Lucy Smith Stanley. Cynthia "Cousin Emmy" May Carver taught "Grandpa" Louis Jones. Clarence "Tom" Ashley learned to play from his aunts, Ary and Daisy. Morgan Sexton was schooled by his sister, Hettie. Earl Scruggs was beaten to the banjo by his older sisters, Eula Mae and Ruby.

On Holiday By Mistake: rekindling the flame for Withnail & I

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, March 11, 2009 05:39pm | Post a Comment

withnail & I in the rain
Today Northern California was treated to another brisk yet glorious morning of blue, cloudless skies. This is a most welcome respite from many weeks draped in a drab grey layer of drizzle, rain and heavy downpours resulting in deluged drains all over the city and local newspaper headlines pointing fingers in jest at the Governator's now weakened "worst drought ever" claim. I love rain and I love seeing tourists in San Francisco -- both mean great things for our fair state. But what I love most about rain in San Francisco is watching tourists deal with it because whether they're curtained in plastic panchos, or struggling with Chinatown-cheap umbrellas (rendered useless by sudden gales), or clutching upside down, sopping wet sight-seeing schedules (inexpensive print ink bleeding from the page) with arms weighed down with souvenir bags (pakced full of chocolate, magnets, mugs, keychains, more chocolate and "Alcatraz Swim Team" T-shirts) they still manage to make the most of their cold, wet pre-season, bargain-priced, best-value vacation. Perhaps they'll leave nothing of their hearts in San Francisco when they leave, their inundated ephemera safely stowed. I often wonder when I spy these hapless yet brave winter visitors (and their shivering, fog-weary summer counterparts) if they ever question whether or not they might've been swindled by a capricious Mother Nature. After all, pleasant yet drought-like weather predictions were widely published recently, before the storms hit, and they could have only anticipated the best weather ever. Packed wet and disheveled into drafty, wet cable car cabins, however, their faces seemed to say, "we've gone on holiday by mistake."
Withnail & I Richard E. Grant and Paul McGann at Monty's cottage penrith england
If you recognize the above reference then it's time for you to watch Withnail & I (written and directed by Bruce Robinson, 1987) again. If, on the contrary, the quote means nothing to you, then I am jealous of you because that means you get to watch one of the greatest, infinitely quotable "buddy" films of all time for the first time -- and what I would give to relive that initial viewing again. Every time I see that cinematically understated opening sequence, steeped in misery and ominous drear, I feel a wave of comfort and nostalgia rush over me not unlike the pleasant feelings one gets from meeting a kindred spirit at an old haunt where time seems suspended and conversations remain forever open-ended. It settles and preps me for the bountiful barrage of verbal gems that follow, falling from the screen preciously like booty from buried treasure. Recent lovingly oft-quoted films like Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Superbad, Anchorman and The 40-Year-Old Virgin are, when compared to Withnail & I, like cup noodles prancing in the shadow of soul food. I think a more comparable modern counterpart to Withanail & I might be found in The Big Lebowski, but there's an undercurrent of poetry that Withnail carries which, sadly, Lebowski hath not. 
withnail and i monty's cottage sleddale hall cumbria
Some of that poetry recently went up for sale. According to BBC News, Sleddale Hall, or Crow Cragg as it is called in the film, was put up for sale in late January and was listed as being "in the veiled parlance of a slick estate agent, in need of a bit of modernization." Though the shoddy, semi-derelict cottage perched among the steep rolling hills of England's picturesque Lake District is only accessible via a dirt track miles away from any real roads and requiring special permission to trespass, a steady stream of fans make the pilgrimage to, if for no other reason, scribble some of their favorite quotes on the walls. "Uncle Monty's cottage" sold at a lively auction (described by The Times as "almost as melodramatic as Richard E. Grant's performance as an alcoholic actor convinced he is destined for stardom" in reference to the Withnail character in the film) packed with fans who shouted lines at each other before ultimately being sold for £265,000 to Sebastian Hindley, a politician and pub-owner local to the area where the run-down farmhouse turned cult-film-junky-mistaken-vacation destination lay. "Free for those who can afford it, very expensive to those who can't" is not a Withnail quote that Hindley seems to favor for he claims that he hopes to make the cottage available to all who love the film and quote it ceaselessly (on the walls and especially on the front door of the beloved "Crow Cragg.") withnail and i monty's cottage crow cragg door quotes here hare here

26 women's history fictional films

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 10, 2009 11:06pm | Post a Comment
Aelita Queen of Mars  Diary of a Lost Girl
 

   

     

   

   

Bad Girls In The Movies

Posted by phil blankenship, March 10, 2009 11:02pm | Post a Comment
 Bad Girls In The Movies

Bad Girls In The Movies

Lightning Video LA9074

Rachel Getting Married: Not Quite Happily Ever After

Posted by Miss Ess, March 10, 2009 06:38pm | Post a Comment
Of all the Oscar related films I have seen thus far this season, Rachel Getting Married felt the most real to me.

rachel getting married

Jonathan Demme directed this film and the footage has a documentary, fly on the wall feeling to it -- it's shakey, hand heldrachel getting married and doesn't shy away from catching awkward moments. It perfectly suits the film's plot and the depths of intensity that the characters plumb throughout. The film centers around a wounded family getting together to celebrate the wedding of Rachel (the gorgeous Rosemarie DeWitt of Mad Men) and Sidney (Tunde Adebimpe of TV on the Radio). Kym (Oscar-nominated Anne Hathaway) is Rachel's attention-needy, just out of rehab sister.

I found this film to be extremely absorbing -- it really delves into the emotions and complications of a family whose deeply cracked ties are dangerously close, in some cases, to becoming fully broken. Kym's self absorption wreaks havoc on each family member in different ways and they all struggle to cope with her actions in the crucible of a fully yuppified wedding weekend. The languid pace of the film adds to its authentic charm -- the viewer is led slowly through a series of moments that have a strong cinema vérité feeling. We are innocent bysrachel getting marriedtanders as a layered history of pain and grief is slowly revealed, bringing this family to and through the emotionally charged wedding weekend.

Amoeba Music’s 3rd Annual Art Show Meets Warhol’s Factory

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 10, 2009 04:04pm | Post a Comment

Not only are the Amoeba employees masters of arcane musical knowledge, but a number of them are gifted visual artists and musicians too. After a long day of helping customers locate rare Do-wop 45’s, determining the going rate of an early 80’s Axe album, and stock-checking the Watchmen soundtrack, many Amoebites rush home to paint, film, draw, compose, sculpt, and, of course, go to band practice.

For the last couple of years, Amoeba Music has thrown annual art shows to exhibit and celebrate the creative works of its multi-talented staff members from all three Amoeba locations. For the Third Annual Amoeba Art Show, which took place on Friday, March 6, 2009, Amoeba transcended the “art show” format and went straight for an outright “happening” with the Andy Warhol-inspired Factory Party. Collaborating with the East Bay Express, OFFSpace, and contributing sponsor the de Young Museum, Amoeba turned the 44,000 square foot Hero Arts warehouse space in Emeryville, California into a teeming hotspot of live art, film, musical performances, and theatrical art forms.



On the evening of Friday, March 6th, after weeks of preparation, the doors were thrown wide to over 4,000 attendees, revealing a labyrinthine network of rooms packed with Amoebite art, beautiful revelers, and a staggering number of Andy Warhol and Factory “Superstar” look-alikes. The East Bay Express devoted one massively large room to recreating Warhol’s Factory, complete with silver-foiled walls and reproductions of the now-iconic red couch and mirrored disco ball table (built by East Bay Express Sales & Marketing Director Terry Furry). Screen printing demonstrations were held by Jesse Hazelip and Tim Belonax, and the room featured an homage to Warhol’s Brillo Boxes built by Jason MacDougall and screened by Philip X. Diaz.

Rootbeer Please!

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 10, 2009 11:16am | Post a Comment

Ever listen to the same song on repeat for like 2, 6, 9 hours straight? It happens; music is intoxicating like that sometimes and everyone’s heard a song that spoke directly to him or her at one time or another. Maybe it moved you deeply and in return you treasured it dearly and barked hysterically at anyone who tried to interrupt the connection between your ears and the speakers. At that moment in time for you, the listener, that song is like the ninth wonder of the world. Subsequently, without proper headgear, for an innocent bystander catching all those repeated listenings, it is considered intolerable cruelty. Since I didn’t put anyone through that type of torture and utter misery I’ll rest easy tonight. Although there is this obnoxious ringing ear thing I’m currently suffering from due to listening to the same track today at an inappropriately loud volume for an inappropriately long amount of time.

The track I just couldn't get enough of: “Girlies” by the Cornerstone signed super rapper/producer/hipster duo Rootbeer. Their EP, Pink Limousine, drops today, March 10th. Tuesday, if you need a calendar, 2009 if you need a clue…just here to help. Their sound is light hearted, back to basics hip hop: simple, common man, catchy street talk, irresistible hooks laced with a side of cotton candy, and head bobbing beats to make you scream bananas, have your chocolate cake and eat it too. It’s like the brilliant wit and playfulness that was Kid n' Play or Will Smith and DJ Jazzy Jeff on their debut, Parents Just Don’t Understand, blended with the indisputable freshness that was Young MC and Tone Loc. So, go cop Rootbeer’s EP cause they’re bringing the goodness. Put me in a better mood than my very disappointing water pressure did this morning.  

Amoeba Music's Third Annual Art Show

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 10, 2009 11:05am | Post a Comment

WOMEN IN HIP-HOP PT. II: FLY GIRLS! B-BOYS BEWARE

Posted by Billyjam, March 10, 2009 09:30am | Post a Comment

The history books show, as recently as the early nineteenth century women in the United States were considered second-class citizens, subservient to men, and whose existence was limited to the interior life of caring for the home and children. Not only did women not have the right to vote, but after marriage they did not have the right to own property, maintain their wages, or  even sign a contract.

Of course, things have changed radically since then, especially in this country, and in 2009 we like to think everyone is equal regardless of gender, color, race, age, religion, or sexual orientation. But let's be real: we still have a ways to go for true equality. And you have to look no further than at hip-hop for proof that gender inequality exists-- the ratio of female to male artists is totally uneven, in favor of men. Flip through the CD or vinyl hip-hop aisles at Amoeba Music and odds are the ratio of female to male artists will be 1 to 10 at best or 1 to 20 at worst. Why is that? There are many reasons that I will explore in later installments of this Women In Hip-Hop Amoeblog series for Women's History Month. But for now I just want to celebrate some of the great female hip-hop artists, starting off with this Amoeblog focusing on the female emcees featured on the recent Soul Jazz release Fly Girls! B-Boys Beware: Revenge Of The Super Female Rappers!

A highly recommended tribute to the fly girls of hip hop, this CD and limited vinyl pressing, which has been selling well at Amoeba since its late January release date, is a wonderful historic overview of some of the funkiest female tracks from the 70's through the 80's and into the 90's. Of course, with just twenty tracks this snapshot only scratches the surface of the history of women in hip-hop, but considering that, it still does a hell of a job and unless you have been avidly collecting hip-hop over the years you need this for your collection.

24 Fact-Based Films Celebrate Women's History Month

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 10, 2009 01:06am | Post a Comment
   
    
       
  
   
   
   

Don't Panic!

Posted by Whitmore, March 9, 2009 08:12pm | Post a Comment
hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy
Yesterday (and it always seems to fall on a yesterday) on this date in 1978, the mind-bending sci-fi comedy adventure series that no doubt changed life, the universe and everything -- well, as far as I know, however I know, or think I understand to know, I know when I know, no matter how intangible the facts ... but anyway -- Douglas AdamsThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy was originally broadcast in the United Kingdom on the BBC radio. It would be another three years, March of 1981, before the Hitchhikers Guide series finally premiered in the United States on National Public Radio.
 
Adams would follow up this initial version of The Hitchhiker's Guide with more radio productions, five novels, computer games, a six part television miniseries and finally a major motion picture. Not to mention a variety of short stories, comic books, essays and enough odds and ends to fill any aging record store employee’s emotional void. Unfortunately Arthur Dent’s, Ford Prefect’s, Trillion’s, Marvin’s and Zaphod Beeblebrox’ galaxy came to an abrupt and tragic halt when Douglas Adams died of a heart attack at the age of 49 while working out in a gym in the town of Montecito near Santa Barbara on May 11, 2001. 
 
Oddly enough I still hold a grudge against Santa Barbara County and the town of Montecito, and especially jogging treadmills. I know it’s irrational but I’ll debate these opinions with anyone under any circumstances in circumstances beyond anyone’s control anytime. (Then again, irrationality is one of our species' most interesting and unique traits, along with regret and that opposable prehensile thumb). Anyway, I know treadmills are mostly harmless, Santa Barbara is mostly harmless but Adams' early death has always pissed me off to no end. I think the universe, once again, was short-changed and bung holed by some bitter, bitter cosmic throw of the dice. Officially the cause of death was a gradual narrowing of the coronary arteries, which led to a myocardial infarction and a fatal cardiac arrhythmia -- a condition Adams unknowingly suffered. And I am still sad.
 
Here is the first episode of the BBC's radio production of the The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.



(In which you might enjoy a fever.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 9, 2009 03:02pm | Post a Comment
American shad
The American shad or Atlantic shad, Alosa sapidissima, is a species of anadromous fish in family Clupeidae of order Clupeiformes.
It is the State Fish of Connecticut, enjoys foreign films and candle-lit dinners for two.


Not that long ago, a customer came into Amoeba Music Hollywood and approached me sheepishly. She uttered that accustomed customer opening line:

“I’m looking for a song… I don’t know the name of it, or who did it…”

If Amoeba Music employees had a dime for every time we heard that sentence, our bosses could dispense with payroll and we’d all live comfortably (hint, hint, Gov. Schwarzenegger).

Oftentimes, we Amoebites will know what the human’s looking for. That’s because we’re mostly socially awkward music geeks who’ve traded in awesome housing and reasonable hair-styles for choice, Italian soundtrack LP’s and an ability to name-that-tune of obscure mouth-harp blues artists.

The song the woman was looking for was “Fever,” which has been covered by many artists, though most famously by the great Peggy Lee


“Fever” was written by Eddie Cooley and Otis Blackwell and published in 1956. At first the songwriters had little success with the song, until they decided to re-write it using words and music. These proved to be the magic ingredients, and soon people took interest. It first became a hit for the (unfortunately named) Little Willie John...

HANK LOCKLIN, OPRY'S OLDEST LIVING MEMBER, PASSES AT AGE 91

Posted by Billyjam, March 9, 2009 02:20pm | Post a Comment

As reported by today's Nashville CIty Paper, Hank Locklin, the Grand Ole Opry's oldest living member, died early yesterday (March 8th) at his Brewton, Alabama home of unknown causes. He was 91 years of age. Ever-prolific and active, Locklin only very recently released his 65th album -- By the Grace of God, a collection of gospel songs.

Born Lawrence Hankins Locklin, he was a member of the revered Grand Ole Opry family since 1960 and had a long recording career with RCA Victor, with whom he scored such notable hits as “Please Help Me I’m Falling” (a Top Ten Billboard hit in 1960), “Send Me the Pillow That You Dream On,” "Happy Journey," “Happy Birthday To Me," "Geisha Girl," and “The Country Hall Of Fame." (audio below)

Locklin, who was one of country music’s first Honky Tonk singers, was listed along with his single "Please Help Me I'm Falling" in Billboard Magazine's 100th Anniversary issue as the second most successful country single of the rock ‘n’ roll era.

Imaginary Jukebox: Part 1

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 9, 2009 08:54am | Post a Comment

My friend Shin Miyata from Japan came to visit over the weekend. He wanted to go to a bar in East L.A. that he had never been to. After discussing a few that were "been there, done that" by Shin, we decided on a steakhouse/bar in Monterey Park called The Venice Room. We arrived just in time to hear someone sing a Karaoke version of Eric Clapton’s “Wonderful Tonight.” It was painful. It was so bad that Shin apologized to me on behalf of the Japanese people for creating Karaoke. The Venice Room looks like it was the place to be at one point. Now it seems like it has gone the way of many neighborhood bars in the area. People want sports, so it's ESPN on the T.V. screen the entire night. The décor of the place has been ruined by way too many beer advertisements. And then, there is Karaoke. On the plus side, at least it’s not some hipster joint. The Venice Room serves its purpose. It’s a neighborhood bar for neighborhood people. Drinks are cheap and I can choose to fall into the fun or go to another place for drinks. That night we chose to go to Ordoñez for some late night food since The Venice Room had stopped serving food.

The Venice Room reminded me of dive bars I used to hang out in when I had just turned twenty-one. Each one was a new experience. Some I liked and some I didn’t. Most of the time, the places I liked were dictated on the jukebox. My favorite places were the ones that still had the jukeboxes with the 45’s in them. With CD jukeboxes, there is always that person who will play an entire Doors album. Then you get stuck listening to them sing along with the whole thing and soon you wish the joint had Karaoke. With 45’s, you had the choice of side A or B of a single. It discourages the jukebox hogs. You can’t play the entire “Dark Side Of The Moon” album because it can’t fit on a 45. I got exposed to some great music by not having many choices. The limited choices forced you to listen to artists that normally you wouldn’t listen to. Even if you only played the artists that you liked, you would be forced to listen to the b-side of a single at some point.

Ancients

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 9, 2009 12:25am | Post a Comment
lydia mendoz una voz y una guitarra azteca record labelheadlights some racing, some stopping icarus image record labelexitos de la sonora santanera dimsa record label Topiltzin Quetzalcoatl image
santan marathon record labelfreedom's rise medusa head record label
ralph dudley reemo records label classic discus thrower image historical records label pan imagegrupo alpha epsilon record label classic discus thrower image
sodom and gomorra soundtrack legend records label miklos rozsa griffin imagemusic of greece national geographic society record label venus de milo imageneptune records label billy paul ebony woman
janus records original label designolympic records labeljanus records common label design
caligula soundtrack penthouse recordspallas record labellouis armstrong sagapan records pan image
edwin hawkins's singers pavilion records labelgap band total experience records label icarus imagefreda payne band of gold lp invictus records the thinker image

The Jigoku Aesthetic: Hell as Excessive Specular Mediation

Posted by Charles Reece, March 8, 2009 08:42pm | Post a Comment
JIGOKU

jigoku

Hallucinate

jigoku

Dessegregate

jigoku

Mediate

jigoku

Alleviate

jigoku hell

Try not to hate

jigoku hell

Love your mate
Don't suffocate on your own hate


Ruth Crawford Seeger - Modernist-cum-Folkie

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 8, 2009 07:43pm | Post a Comment
Female composers getting the short shrift is certainly nothing new, and is by no means limited to classical music. But as an admittedly casual fan of atonality, dissonance, modernism and serialism, I was surprised in February of this year to, for the first time, stumble across Middlewestern composer Ruth Crawford Seeger's unique, innovative musical voice. She immediately became a featured artist on The Lunatic Asylum and I became interested in her story.

Ruth Porter Crawford was born on July 3, 1901 in East Liverpool, Ohio, supposedly the "World Capital of Pottery." Her father was an itinerant minister. Her mother began her musical education with piano lessons when she was 11. Upon graduation from high school, she entered Foster's School of Musical Art in Jacksonville, Florida. In 1921, when it relocated to Miami, Crawford enrolled at the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago, where she studied with Madame Valborg Collett, Polish-born Henriot Levy and Louise Robyn. By 24, with the completion of her earliest work, she already displayed a unique modernist voice.

Ruth Crawford c. 1924

In Chicago, she met Djane Lavoie Herz, who in turn introduced her to the music of sometime-serialist Russian composer Alexander Scriabin. Through Lavoie Herz, she met and fell in with transpersonal astrologer/composer Dane Rudhyar, theorist/composer Henry Cowell and pianist Richard Bühlig. Cowell was an early supporter of her work and arranged for performances of her compositions in New York, where her folkish take on avant-garde drew comparisons to the work of Charles Ives and Aaron Copland.

This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 8, 2009 12:20pm | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly!

The March / April calendar is now online:
www.NewBevCinema.com

Printed calendars will be in early this week! Now  we need your help to make sure they get seen - pick one up for yourself and a few for your friends!

Screenwriter Josh Olson, writer of the Oscar nominated script for David Cronenberg's 2005 film A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE, will be guest curator and will appear in person together with other special guests. The week kicks off with a screening of his A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE paired with Sam Peckinpah's STRAW DOGS, and then continues with a series of films selected by Mr. Olson.

From Josh Olson:

A couple years ago, I drove past the New Beverly, and came to a screeching halt in the rain when I saw they were showing a double feature of Straw Dogs and A History of Violence. I was flattered, honored, tickled, and half a dozen other things that felt pretty damn good, and I mentioned this event many times in many forums.

So, flash forward to this year, and I am now programming said theater for a week - the second week of March, to be precise.

There's no theme to the week, save "These are movies I love," and it's a weird, hodgepodge of stuff.

I'll be there to introduce them all, and, in some cases, to talk to some of the writers responsible for them.

MARCH 8th: INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY

Posted by Billyjam, March 8, 2009 05:00am | Post a Comment

Today, March 8th, is the day recognized every year as International Woman's Day (IWD). It is a major day of global celebration for the economic, political and social achievements of women. IWD began as a political event, with the annual event blended in the culture of many countries (primarily Russia, as well as other nations of the former Soviet bloc).

While In some cultures IWD has lost some of its political flavor and become simply an occasion for men to express their love or respect towards women (a la Valentines Day meets Mother's Day), in many more countries it has maintained its political/sociological edge, where issues pertaining specifically to women are discussed. This year is no exception, as the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has warned that the specific health-care needs of women are often ignored or insufficiently taken into account in war situations.

The ICRC points out, "In the world’s least developed countries, many of which are at war, women are 300 times more likely to die in childbirth or from pregnancy-related complications than in developed countries, according to UNICEF. While armed conflicts and other violence affect entire communities, women are particularly at risk of rape and other forms of sexual violence. Because of poor security conditions or because they have no means of transportation, it is often impossible for women to reach a health-care facility so as to give birth safely."

And in recognition of IWD, leaders from seven international organizations converged in New York this week for a 'Girl Power and Potential' reception with the event featuring a panel of speakers outlining the strategies and goals of the United Nations Interagency Task Force on Adolescent Girls. For more information click here.

All American Girls

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, March 7, 2009 01:00am | Post a Comment





































Thanks to Chris Matthews for this brilliant find. The rather religious Sister Sledge might not have envisioned this group of gals when they named their album All American Girls but, after finding these photos stuffed inside of said LP, I must say there is something totally beautiful & appropriate about the pairing.

My Current Ten

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 6, 2009 09:47pm | Post a Comment




Diplo: Decent Work For Decent Pay (hip-hop)









   Madlib: Beat Konducta Vol. 5-6: A Tribute to... (hip-hop)









Señor Coconut: Coconut FM Legendary Latin Tunes (electronica)










88-keys: The Death of Adam (hip-hop)











Rodriguez: Cold Fact (rock)










Nightmares On Wax: Thought So... (electronica)








Delia Derbyshire - electronic music pioneer

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 6, 2009 07:33pm | Post a Comment
Delia Derbyshire

The Guardian once described Delia Derbyshire as “The unsung heroine of British electronic music,” seemingly implying that there are other heroines of British electronic music that are more widely… sung. I suppose there is Daphne Oram but the English never use less than three adjectives when one will suffice, so let’s just say that Delia Derbyshire is an unsung heroine of music. That she happens to have worked primarily in electronic music is secondary and that she was British shouldn't be held against her. She was a wizard and pioneer who, instead of guarding her magical abililties, eagerly shared her techniques and discoveries, but was stifled by the BBC’s draconian demands that their artists work and die in anonymity.


Delia was born in Coventry on May 5th, 1937. As a girl, she learned piano and violin and attended Barr's Hill School. She later attended college at Girton in Cambridge. After initially pursuing studies in math, she switched courses to music before graduation. After graduation, she began to look for work in the music field, quickly butting up against the deeply entrenched sexism of the field. In fact, in 1959, upon applying for a job at Decca, she was flatly told that their policy was to not hire women to work in the studios. The United Nations proved more diplomatic than the folks at Decca, and she worked there for a short while. Then she returned to England and found employment at the London-based music publisher, Boosey & Hawkes. She didn’t stay long.
In 1960, she was hired as a trainee studio manager at the BBC, working with the Radiophonic Workshop, then just a few years old. It was an organization charged with producing experimental incidental music and sound effects for the BBC Third Programme’s radio plays in cases where the normal orchestral score was deemed inappropriate. Her predecessors had included Harry Desmond Briscoe and Daphne Oram, two noted pioneers of electronic music and musique concrète.
Derbyshire came on board following Oram’s departure, as part of a group of young artists that also included Brian Hodgson and John Baker. Many of her initial pieces were collaborations with artist/playwright Barry Bermange. One such piece was 1964’s The Dreams, a sound collage of people describing their dreams with Derbyshire's electronic sounds.


Gradually, the Radiophonic Workshop began producing more music and sound effects for television than radio. One year earlier, in 1963, Derbyshire performed her mostly widely-heard work when given the score for Ron Grainer’s theme to a new science-fiction series, Doctor Who. Incorporating filters, tape loops and valve oscillators, she fashioned one of the most memorable pieces of electronic music ever, and one that's especially dear to Whovians. Grainer was so impressed he sought to give Derbyshire co-author credit but the BBC prevented it. Although officially uncredited, the popularity of the theme resulted in her employers giving her many other assignments and she ultimately produced over 200 pieces including noteworthy scores for Great Zoos of the World and Cyprian Queen. The BBC was, however, by no means entirely supportive of her work, rejecting many of her compositions, claiming they were too bizarre, “too lascivious for 11 year olds” and “too sophisticated for the BBC2 audience.”

AMOEBA MUSIC WEEKLY HIP-HOP ROUND UP 03:06:09

Posted by Billyjam, March 6, 2009 06:00am | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Berkeley Hip-Hop Top Five: 03:06:09

1) K'NAAN Troubadour (A&M/Octone Records)

2) Zion I The TakeOver (Gold Dust Media)

3) Madlib Beat Konducta 5 & 6 (Stones Throw)

4) RZA Afro Samurai Resurrection (TVT)

5) Beastie Boys Paul's Boutique (reissue) (Capitol)

Thanks to Inti at the Berkeley Amoeba Music for this week's Hip-Hop Top Five chart which finds reigning Somalia hip-hop music star K'NAAN in the top slot with his new album Troubadour. He was also number one at the Hollywood Amoeba last week. Meanwhile, Oakland duo ZIon I, who were number one at Amoeba SF two weeks ago, are in the number two slot with their highly recommended new album The TakeOver, which is full of potential hit singles. Currently Zion I, made up of producer AmpLive and emcee Zumbia, are on a West Coast tour. For details click here.

To celebrate its 20th anniversary, the Beastie Boys' second album, 1989's Paul's Boutique, was recently reissued and has been selling well at all Amoeba stores since its late January reissue date. At the Berkeley store it is this week's number five top seller.

A lot has changed in the 20 years since the album's initial release from the New York group. Initially considered a paul's boutiquecommercial failure by their record label, who expected Licensed To Ill-scale sales and pop radio acceptance, the album catapulted the Beasties from being remembered as mere novelty rap act to serious hip-hoppers in the music history books. Included in countless magazines and critics' "Best Of" album lists, the 20th anniversary reissue of Paul's Boutique package features 24-bit remaster audio and a commentary track. If you don't already own this album, get it.

Billie Maxwell - The Cow Girl Singer

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 5, 2009 09:00pm | Post a Comment

The 1920s and ‘30s were full of cowgirl singers like the Girls of the Golden West (Millie and Dolly Good), Patsy Montana and Texas Ruby, most of whom were just as inauthentic as their better known male counterparts like Gene Autry and the Sons of the Pioneers. However, one western performer was the real deal: Billie Maxwell.

                      Springerville Arizona
One of the two known photos of Billie Maxwell (left), Springerville, Arizona in the 1920s (right).

Billie Maxwell was born in 1906 and raised near Springerville, Arizona, same place where Ike Clanton, one of the Missourian players in the Gunfight at the OK Corral, was shot dead by a detective not 20 years earlier. Her father, E. Curtis Maxwell, was locally renowned as a fiddler who'd amassed a massive repertoire of songs learnt from his father, William Beatty Maxwell, an Illinoisan who’d moved first to Nevada and then Arizona in the 1800s. Curtis Maxwell formed a string band called the White Mountain Orchestra who toured (on horseback) the ranches in the area, playing dances. Not only did Maxwell know many traditional songs, but he composed his own work too, including “Escudilla Waltz” and “Frolic of the Mice.” In her teenage years, Billie joined her father’s band, where she played guitar alongside her brother, Marion, who played mandolin. Eventually she occasionally struck out on her own, performing solo shows in the backcountry.


In 1929, at the age of 23, she married a local schoolteacher, Alvin Chester Warner, and settled down to raise a family. A few months later, in June, her uncle Frank Maxwell (a lawman over in Silver City) noticed a classified in the local paper advertising an upcoming field recording session for Victor over in El Paso. At an audition, the White Mountain Orchestra were deemed worthy and two weeks later Chester Warner drove his wife, Marion, Curtis and Frank to a recording session where they met Ralph Peer.

out this week 2/24 & 3/3...depeche mode....gui boratto...sebastian tellier...

Posted by Brad Schelden, March 5, 2009 07:35pm | Post a Comment
depeche mode
I was always a way bigger fan of Depeche Mode than U2. I still remember the day I decided to become a Depeche Mode fan instead of U2. It was sort of like the day I decided to become a Blur fan instead of an Oasis fan. I know many people like both bands. I have many friends who like both U2 and Depeche Mode. But for me, I felt like it had to be one or the other. My brother was the U2 fan in the family, so that was probably the main reason I decided to turn my back on U2. To this day I have never really understood everybody's fascination with U2. I think U2 did end up becoming the more popular of the 2 bands. They both still have huge followings. Both are on a short list of rock bands from the 80's that can still sell out huge arena tours and sell tons of albums. U2's first album Boy came out in 1980. No Line On the Horizon is out this week and is the band's 12th album. Depeche Mode's first album Speak and Spell came out in 1981. Their new album, Sounds of the Universe, is also their 12th album. U2 beat them by about a year with their first album and are now beating them by about a month with their 12th album. Anton Corbijn obviously could not make up his mind like I did-- I think he likes both bands equally. He seems to have done almost every video and photo shoot for both bands. I probably will not even get around to hearing the new U2 album, but I am curious how the fans are receiving it. They are one of those bands who put out an album and the longtime fans justu2 automatically buy it. I am the same way with Depeche Mode. I am seriously counting down the days until the new album comes out -- April 21st. Only 47 days to go! But the new single is ready for you to listen to at least. I actually heard it on KROQ for the first time a couple of weeks ago. I probably heard "People are People" for the first time on KROQ as well, many years ago. I may not be a U2 fan, but I do love the U2 fans almost as much as I love the longtime Depeche Mode fans. I sort of stand with them in solidarity. It is not always easy to stand by a band for 28 years, but they make it worth it. Depeche Mode is one of those bands that I can't imagine my life without. One of those bands that we all have been made fun of for liking but also a band that has given us a whole new set of friends and a sort of musical solidarity with each other.

COVERING CREEP: RATING RADIOHEAD COVERS

Posted by Billyjam, March 5, 2009 11:11am | Post a Comment
radiohead
Since Radiohead first released the Thom Yorke-penned song "Creep" seventeen years ago, numerous artists -- including many well known, high-profile acts -- have covered the Radiohead hit that became so popular that the band themselves distanced themselves from it for a spell.

Originally released in 1992 as their debut single, "Creep" was not initially a hit. But it did become one when it was rereleased the following year, when it also appeared on their debut album Pablo Honey. Out of uneasiness with becoming a sort of one-hit-wonder band associated with this sole major worldwide hit, plus the fact that Radiohead had shifted in style as the nineties progressed, Yorke and the band ceased playing it in concert altogether by 1998. After three years, they changed their mind and re-added it to their show playlists, although only sporadically.

Truth is that it is a great song and one that one that countless others have covered: many of which are included below in either video or audio format. Included in the versions are covers by Beck, Chrissie Hynde/Pretenders, Moby, KoRN, the Dutch band Shiver, Sad Kermit, and Weezer at a Hootenanny in Portland last summer. Weezer also played the song at a Hootenanny in the Bay Area and again at a concert in Tokyo last year. Also below is the original version by Radiohead. Not below but viewable on YouTube is Tears For Fears 1996 live in Brasil cover of the song. 

My personal fave remains the original, with Chrissie Hynde coming in a close second. I place off-key Moby (an ariist who I normally like) in the last place, even behind the frog named Sad Kermit. If you have time, check out the versions below and post your opinion / rating of best to worst version in the COMMENTS below.
                                                          -------------------------------
Amoeblog Update: thanks to the Amoeblog commenters SFatNIght who informed me of the Prince cover of "Creep" at Coachella last year which is not great audio quality recording but well worth checking out, and also to Amoeblog commenter Robert Gable who turned me onto the wonderful Edmund Welles bass clarinet quartet version of the song which I have added below. Thanks!

March 3, 2009

Posted by phil blankenship, March 4, 2009 05:09pm | Post a Comment
Taken movie ticket stub Mann's Glendale Exchange







Nash of Wooden Shjips Chats

Posted by Miss Ess, March 4, 2009 04:02pm | Post a Comment
Wooden Shjips are my favorite local band. See this past piece to read more about why I particularly adore them, and you should too. You can check out some of their music and tour dates on their Myspace page, watch a video from their '07 Amoeba instore here and see more pictures here. Read on for my interview with Nash, Wooden Shjips' keyboard pro.

wooden shjips amoeba instore

Miss Ess: What have you been listening to lately?

Nash: In the past week I have been listening to a lot of Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, and a few things I just got for my birthday, La Düsseldorf and Cold Son.
la dusseldorf
ME: What music was playing in your house when you were growing up, before you had a choice about it?

Nash: I think my mom listened to a lot of soft rock radio in the 70's because I seem to know all those songs when I hear them now, and my dad was always into classical and opera, but I only really remember him playing Christmas music. I always had a record player in my room and certainly played whatever kid records I had, like Sesame Street, Muppet Show and Disney records. And with two older brothers, I was hearing plenty of Beatles and Rolling Stones, not to mention a little disco, before age 10.

MISSION DISTRICT CELEBRATED IN BEN STOKES' ANIMATED AZEEM VID

Posted by Billyjam, March 4, 2009 01:21pm | Post a Comment

The brilliant, Ben Stokes-directed video above for Azeem's Air Cartoons' album track "Latin Revenge" (on Oaklyn Records with music production by DJ Zeph) takes place in the Mission District of San air cartoons azeemFrancisco. Inspired in part by Terry Gilliam's work and also by Azeem's music, the animated piece also puts a spin on the role of how police are perceived in society. In the video Azeem gains popularity as he peruses the streets of the Mission (eventually becoming a King Kong-like menace) as meanwhile a host of local neighborhood characters take notice. The police in the video are described by the maker as "enablers and cheerleaders."

I called up Azeem the other day to ask him what he thought about the new video. "It made me a fan and it's my video," he laughed, adding that, "All I can say about that video is that I can really almost take no credit for it. I just made the song. Like you and anyone else, I am fan of the video and I am amazed at the level of artistry that it incorporates." The video's animation was done by Ben Stokes (the video's producer/director) with additional animation by Patrick Siemer, who drew from the thousands of still photographs they shot, then cut up, mixed and matched, and then painstakenly animated using After effects.

Ben Stokes, also a part of Tino Corps, D.H.S.,, &  Meat Beat Manifesto, has been professionally making music videos for about 20 years. The Mission District, San Francisco-based Stokes started out doing videos back in 1990 in his native Chicago where he began directing & producing a lot of the pioneering hometown WaxTrax industrial music artists' videos such as Ministry and the Revolting Cocks.

ALIENS Saturday Midnight At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, March 4, 2009 12:54pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!


March 7

Sigourney Weaver vs.
ALIENS

New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Midnight, All Tickets $7


March

March 20 & 21 MAD MAXATHON
Triple Feature of ALL THREE Mad Max Films. Running Two Nights Only!
MAD MAX
THE ROAD WARRIOR
MAD MAX BEYOND THUNDERDOME



March 28 Sam Raimi's Darkman
(Now, Crime Has a New Enemy, And Justice Has a New Face!)

Alice Guy-Blache - first female of film direction

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 3, 2009 08:33pm | Post a Comment
 

Early Years

Alice Guy was born on July 1, 1873. Her French parents were working in Chile, where they owned a chain of bookstores. When Alice's mother got pregnant, the couple returned to Paris where Alice was born. Soon after, her parents returned to South America and left her to be raised by her grandmother in Switzerland. After eventually moving to Chile to rejoin her parents, the family returned to France and enrolled Alice in school. Once again, her parents returned to Chile. Shortly afterward, her father and brother died.


Career
In 1894, Alice was hired by Léon Gaumont as his secretary and still photographer. Whilst working for him, she began experimenting with filmmaking. A couple years later, Gaumont started his own company, Gaumont Film Company and Alice was head of production from 1896 to 1906. In the late 1890s (c. 1898), she directed her first film, La Fee aux Choux (The Cabbage Fairy). In doing so, Alice Guy became the first female film director. In addition to directing at least 324 films, she contributed as a producer, writer or in some other aspect on many more. Though she made slapstick, fantasy, sci-fi, western and action films as well as many other genres, many of her filmes were intended for female audiences and bore a deliberate and outspoken feminist sensibility.

Who's on first, Whats on second

Posted by Whitmore, March 3, 2009 07:43pm | Post a Comment

On this date, March 3rd, fifty years ago, comedian Lou Costello, best known as the plump bumbling half of the comedy team of Abbott and Costello, died of a heart attack. Reportedly his last words were "That was the best ice-cream soda I ever tasted," as he was finishing a strawberry cream soda.

Bud Abbott and Lou Costello made over 40 films together in a 20 year career. Their signature comedy sketch Who's on First? was voted by Time in 1999 as the single greatest comedy routine of the 20th century. Who's on First? first appeared on radio in March 1938, after Abbott and Costello joined the cast of the The Kate Smith Hour. Two years later, with minor alterations, Abbott and Costello reprised the sketch in their Hollywood film debut, One Night in the Tropics starring Allan Jones, Nancy Allen and Bob Cummings.  
 
It was so successful, so famous that the bit appeared in several of their films. Audiences never seemed to tire of its ridiculous rapid-fire word play. In 1944 Abbott and Costello had the comedy sketch copyrighted.
 
The piece starts with Bud Abbott talking about the crazy nicknames of baseball ballplayers and Costello wants to know more about the local team and needless to say, who is playing each position.
 
Oh yeah, who's on first ... naturally.
 
The concept is as simple as that.
 
Unfortunately each of the ballplayers nicknames can also be interpreted as a non-responsive answer to Costello's endless questioning. Nearly 70 years later this bit is still absolutely brilliant. And absolutely absurd. Here's two versions.


Euro Chick Rebellion: Part II

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 3, 2009 02:38pm | Post a Comment

Music aficionados are just as hyped as I am about the return of Ms. Dynamite. She unofficially released her first single since her 2005 album release, Judgment Days. "Bad Gyal" was dropped on BBC radio where adoring fans recorded and reloaded the whole minute and some change teaser up on the Internet for everyone to ravage. The track was produced by garage don "Sticky Booo!" Stickey. It sounds as if M.I.A and some serious dancehall riddim married and had a lyrical baby, a true bundle of joy.

Salaam “The Chameleon” Remi
--pronounced "ray me"-- produced Ms. Dynamite's phenomenal debut album, A Little Deeper, which reached number 10 on the UK charts back in ‘03. How does one sum up Remi in anything less than a novel? He's worked with veterans like Santana and Nas as well as newbies Jazmine Sullivan and Chrisette Michelle. Mr. Remi was the mastermind behind that track for the Fugees no one could seem to get off the tip of their tongue: "Fu-Gee-La." Amy Winehouse's platinum selling debut album, Frank, had his name written all over it, not only as a producer, but as a song-writer as well. His pops was a music man himself. Van Gibbs found a nice cozy spot arranging, producing, leading bands, and playing guitar for artists like Harry Belafonte and Gloria Gaynor. As my Uncle Jerry would say in his fast talking, dirty Southern accent, "That's sum good blood right thar."

Ms. Dynamite has yet to release word on when the new album is set to drop or exactly who else is working on the production side, but rumor has it there is a larger two-step grime influence than her previous works. The hard core grime scene in the UK is somewhat similar to the Miami Bass scene here in the states. It disappeared from the radar for some time, but back in the 80's and the 90's it was often referred to as "booty music" or "dirty rap," with Luke and 2 Live Crew as the poster boys. We've recently seen the emergence of Miami Bass in mainstream success thanks to artists like Diplo, who fuses it together with his southern roots, trip hop and reggae dub. Grime or no grime, I'm excited about Ms. Dynamite's return to the spotlight. Apparently, Lily Allen is too. The rebellious youngster with a tutu said it brought her tears of utter happiness to hear about the impending return Ms. Dynamite. Lady Sovereign, my next subject, is equally excited. She can attest to knowing a little something about that grime scene I mentioned, especially because she reps as the only white female rapper to emerge into the spotlight from the tight knit circle.
 
Lady Sovereign was signed to Def Jam back in 2005 by Jay-Z after he made her drop acapella freestyle for him. She was the first white female MC ever signed to the label. Her debut album, Public Warning, dropped in October of '06 and introduced her to international recognition. The video for the song "Love Me or Hate Me" reached #1 on the US (and original) version of MTV's Total Request Live, making her the first British artist to ever do so. The 5 ft 1, pint-size Londoner with a fiercely independent creative spirit says she's never been your average rapper. If I had to describe her sound, I'd say Lady Sovereign is like Missy Elliot on pop rocks and hot tamales: rebelliously witty, sporty spiced, and relentlessly unattached to the social standards of femininity and sexuality. Her new album, Jigsaw, drops in the US on April 7th and April 13th in the UK on her very own label Miget Records. Her hit new single "So Human" samples what I believe is The Cure's 1985 smash "Close to Me" from The Head on The Door album. The first single from Jigsaw, "I Got You Dancing" dropped late last year with a fun packed video which happily marries a Crayola box out of School House Rock with urban street life. Just had to post. Till next time... chew the corners off.

NEW MUSIC LABEL, FEAT. DAEDELUS, BASED ON FRIENDS OF FRIENDS

Posted by Billyjam, March 3, 2009 08:30am | Post a Comment
daedelusFor many, many years now Tuesdays have been the music industry's standard day of the week to release new records and CDs. And today, Tuesday March 3rd, is when brand new Los Angeles music label FoF Music is dropping its inaugural release, Friends of Friends Vol. 1 featuring Daedelus and fellow LA electronic act, duo Jogger. But similarities with the traditional music industry business model end there for this modern, post-Internet age, self-described "T-shirt label," whose catalog will be all digital file only releases.
 
"The Internet in many ways has been “the great equalizer” for both artists and music fans, giving us all new opportunities to release, buy and receive music," writes creator of this new indie label Leeor Brown on FoF's website. The concept for FoF Music, which stands for Friends of Friends Music, he writes, is to invite an artist "to join the FoF family by signing on to do a split EP; they in turn invite another musician or group to complete the split release and commission a designer to create the EP’s artwork on a limited edition T-Shirt which will include a download card (100% seed paper card-- Included will be the release, exclusive remixes and special content: ie videos, mixes etc)."

Today's premiere release, Friends of Friends Vol. 1, is a digital only six song shared "EP" with three songs each from number one "friend" Daedelus (born Alfred Darlington) and his friend Jogger. Alfred also invited friends Amir Yaghmai (who he attended high school with) and Jonathan Larroquette, both of whom are active live band members of his side project The Long Lost with his wife Laura, to also contribute to the new project. Additionally he invited the husband and wife art duo Kozyndan to do the cover art/t-shirt design for the release.

(In which we celebrate the birth of B.S.)

Posted by Job O Brother, March 2, 2009 04:31pm | Post a Comment
czech
"Say smažák!"
Composer Bedřich Smetana

As all of you are undoubtedly already aware, today would have been the 185 birthday of Czech composer, Bedřich Smetana (pronounced Bedřich Smetana), had he not succumbed to a tenacious and ultimately fatal case of death.

I always love to hear how you, my faithful readers, celebrate Smetana’s Birthday, whether it be the traditional donning of feather headdresses and consumption of chocolate 'n' gunpowder cakes, or playing the challenging 8-mile Egg Toss, or simply drawing x’s all over your skin in blue ink while cowering in a corner, gnashing your teeth and rubbing sores with the delicious, homemade watermelon hard candies.
pink
In my family, we’ve replaced the expensive and messy tradition of drowning kittens in butterscotch with the more humane practice of snowing in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. This is not only kinder to animals, but ensures water-levels for the State of California remain drought-proof.

cook border

AMOEBLOG RECIPE HOT-TIP

Making snow is not as hard as it sounds. Here’s what you will need:

Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss!

Posted by Whitmore, March 2, 2009 01:25pm | Post a Comment

Gadzooks
Dr Seuss
Do you know what this morn brings?
For one thing on this day you were born,
So let’s sing
Ting a ling a song we’ll bring
So toot a flute
Go blow a horn
Let’s celebrate this great date in 1904.
Today sir
Is Monday for sure
Take a look
In my calendar book.
On page three you can see
The month to be is March I believe
And the day,
It says number two,
But not the number two like pooh,
Number two
Like a smooth loop into a curly cue.
The day between one and three,
A second before the third,
Two before four and three before five …
Just a try to solve
What’s enough and where's the stuff
And answer all the whys.
 
Anyway, let me say to you today good sir
Happy birthday in the grandest way
And to make sure of that
Here’s a party hat
A special one, elaborately done
That’s more than just wacky fun,
Designed and refined by critters you made
Who came alive on the page,
Books for kids age one to one hundred twenty three
With names that begin and end from A to Z
And stories even the man on the moon likes to read.
We’ll croon to you a zany tune,
We’ll sing to you a from a crazy balloon
Painted blue and red with yellow thread,
With a sunny bow that glows
Where ever it goes.
We’ll teach a baboon to cook a cake,
We’ll find a dancing prancing loon
To shimmy and shake.
 
Oh but Dr. Seuss let me sigh
It’s so sad and all too bad  
You’re not alive, still today
We will cheer loud and clear
Happy birthday, you're a hundred and five.
So take a look at all your books
and the words that shook us snooks
I still sneak a peak at least once a week,
Catching up with old friends of mine,
From time to time I take a seat
Kick up my feet,
Retreat into your boxes and foxes
And what a fish does
And how to talk to a Cat in the Hat
And a Zither Zather Zuzz.
I used to read to my son for fun,
And now he likes to read alone
On his own
Till the book is done,
It’s a funny twirling whirling
World you shared with us.
Thus and such from me and him
And a zillion,
Kajillion others too
Again and again from us to you
Thank you, Dr. Seuss
Thank you thank you
So very very much.

Oasis

Posted by Whitmore, March 2, 2009 01:20pm | Post a Comment
The Brit-pop band Oasis’ first ever concert tour of China, planned for this spring, has been cancelled;  Chinese authorities have deemed the band as being "unsuitable." The shows scheduled for Beijing and Shanghai were due to take place on April 3rd and 5th; tickets sales were stopped on February 28, according to China Daily Newspaper.
 
Though no clear explanation has been given other than Oasis being “unsuitable,” it’s thought this cancellation might have something to do with China's Culture Ministry's recent discovery that Noel Gallagher played a Free Tibet benefit in the US in 1997 … that is a no-no in Mainland China.
 
Also uncertain is whether or not the show scheduled for Hong Kong on April 7th will take place.
 
The rest of the South East Asian tour will go ahead as planned, as Oasis is currently on a world tour promoting their latest CD, 2008’s Dig Out Your Soul -- their seventh studio album. Just this past week Oasis was voted the best British band at the annual NME Awards. They also won for Best Blog for Noel Gallagher's Tales from the Middle of Nowhere which is published on MySpace.
 
Oasis was formed in Manchester in 1991. Their first number one UK single was “Some Might Say from their second album, (What's the Story) Morning Glory?, peaking back in April 1995. Since then they have chalked up seven more number one hits and sold over 50 million records world wide. They have also collected fifteen NME Awards, five BRIT Awards, nine Q Awards and four MTV Europe Music Awards, plus odds and ends of other awards like the 2002 Top of the Pops and the 2007 Vodafone Live Music Awards.
 
A number of musical acts from the West have performed in China in recent years, including the Rolling Stones and Elton John, but some performers have run into problems on their way to China. Jay-Z was denied permission in 2006 due to his use of profane language. Britney Spears was permitted to play in 2004 but with the strict understanding that her costumes were not to be too revealing. And last year, Icelandic star Bjork made waves when she shouted "Free Tibet!" during her concert in Shanghai.

Happy Texas Independence Day!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 2, 2009 11:21am | Post a Comment

After Mexico gained its independence from Spain, the newly independent country organized itself into several states. In the northern Coahuila y Tejas, there were many Native peoples like the Alabama, Apache, Aranama, Atakapa, Caddo, Comanche, Coahuiltecan, Cherokee, Choctaw, Coushatta, Hasinai, Jumano, Karankawa, Kickapoo, Kiowa and Wichita that the nearly bankrupt Mexican government had little resources to subjugate. So they invited immigrants from the US, called Texians, to help keep down the aborigines.

Soon the immigrants outnumbered the Mexicans and Natives put together. These Texian immigrants made little to no effort to assimilate into their adopted country -- they they self-segregated, carried guns everywhere, didn't learn "the language" (Spanish) and wrote signs in English. Even though slavery was illegal in Mexico, the Texians (who numbered about 30,000) simply ignored Mexican law and brought 5,000 slaves. Before long, Mexican president Bustamante sought to restrict futher American immigration to Mexico, recognizing they were up to no good. Before long, the Texians took up arms and ultimately gained independence from Mexico.

Joel McCrea
Joel McCrea, not Texian, but played one on the radio

By 1850, Texians started referring to themselves most commonly as Texans. The Texas Almanac of 1857 waxed purple about the mere dropping of the letter "i," continuing the Texan tradition of making something out of nothing, moaning [in Chris Elliot's fancy lad voice] "Texian...has more euphony, and is better adapted to the conscience of poets who shall hereafter celebrate our deeds in sonorous strains than the harsh, abrupt, ungainly, appellation Texan -- impossible to rhyme with anything but the merest doggerel."

Nick Gilder's 1978 #1 Hit Hot Child In The City

Posted by Billyjam, March 2, 2009 10:30am | Post a Comment

31 years ago was the career peak of British-born Canadian rocker Nick Gilder, who in October of 1978 scored a number one hit in both the US and in his native Canada with the single "Hot Child In The CIty."

"Hot Child..," a perfect pop-rock song that has stood the test of time, is from Gilder's second solo album CIty Nights (Chrysalis) and was produced by Mike Chapman and co-written with James McCulloch.

Above is the video of Glider's version and below are covers of the timeless track, including one by Dirty Martini and another by an uncredited band who do a really good cover of it.

Reportedly Gilder wrote the song after seeing young girls on Hollywood and Sunset Boulevards in LA. In an interview with Rolling Stone magazine he said, "I've seen a lot of young girls, 15 and 16, walking down Hollywood Boulevard with their pimps. Their home environment drove them to distraction so they ran away, only to be trapped by something even worse. It hurts to see that so I tried writing from the perspective of a lecher -- in the guise of an innocent pop song."

Initially Nick Gilder was a member of Sweeney Todd, the Canadian glam rock band that formed in 1975 and also (very briefly) featured a young Bryan Adams as well as James McCulloch, who also left to join Gilder's solo backing band. Sweeney Todd's one big hit was the summer 1975 single "Roxy Roller," which went to number one on the Canadian music charts and was later covered by Detroit female rocker Suzi Quatro in 1977.

Paisadelic

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 2, 2009 09:17am | Post a Comment

I tend to go on and on about Mas Exitos and Chico Sonido, so I won't bore you too much. Chico Sonido has turned into one of my favorite deejays. I've been to clubs where he is spinning with deejays with big names and he is blowing them out of the water. His vinyl collection runs deep.

What makes Chico Sonido unique is his mixture of obscure covers en español with the funkier side of Spanish language pop music from the 60-80's. Top that off with some Cumbia and Spanish Dancehall and damn, you got a party! So now you can take that party to your home, car or gym. Better yet, take it to your tiá's house and have her take you through memory lane! "cuando estaba joven..."

Chico Sonido will have his debut album out very soon. I'm sure it will be a funky Mexican freak-out for sure. Meanwhile, you can get his mix CD, Paisadelic, by clicking here.

Che The Movie

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 2, 2009 08:30am | Post a Comment

I had many thoughts after I watched the four hour, seventeen minute Che biopic. I enjoyed the movie very much, but because I felt I’m somewhat biased, I wanted to know what people thought about it. Would people's opinions be based on what they thought of the movie or what they thought of Che (or, for that matter, Steven Soderbergh and Benicio Del Toro)?

Did people who proclaimed it great do so because it’s a great story or a great film? Did the people who hate it have their own ulterior motives? I also wondered if I would like it myself if I saw it again.

Che, like Spike Lee’s Malcolm X, was probably a very hard movie to make. Movies about political icons seem to bring out the worst in people. People are overly passionate on both sides of the fence and on top of that, there's a multitude of critics who are quick to knock down any iconic figure of the far left. Serial killers get better treatment by the press. A journalist from PBS interviewed me during the intermission of the movie when I went to see the film. Most of his questions were asked in a condescending tone: “What do you know about Che other than the image we see on the t-shirt?” and "Is Che relevant today?" Duh…I don’t know, is oppression relevant today?

The reviews of the movies weren’t too glowing. Most of them were of the garden variety. I loved the reviewers who stated that the film was both "too long" and “didn’t give enough of Che was really about.” Really, did we want to sit through a ten-hour movie next time?

The other complaint was that it was mostly in Spanish. Along with the length of the film(s), this really turned off many of the Academy, who didn’t even give the film a blink during the Oscars. Made me wonder how well Slumdog Millionaire, which is a great fim, would have done if the actors spoke in Marathi, Urdu or Hindi. Michael Russnow from Huffington Post summed that mentality best:

RITUAL DE LO HABITUAL

Posted by Charles Reece, March 1, 2009 08:31pm | Post a Comment
If I can just get off of this LA freeway
Without getting killed or caught
I'd be down that road in a cloud of smoke
For some land that I ain't bought
-- Guy Clark, "L.A. Freeway"


There are few directors I rank up there with Hitchcock, but Jacques Tati is one of them. I finally got around to watching Criterion's release of Trafic, his final installment in the Monsieur Hulot series. If Playtime is his Vertigo, then that would make Trafic his North By Northwest, only it didn't put Tati back on top of the commerical foodchain. After the box-office failure of Playtime, Tati had to take a step backwards, at least production-wise. Maybe that's why the critics never gave his followup the same attention as all the other Hulot flicks, the artistry of each increasing at exponential rate over the last. And maybe the diminished role of the Hulot character in Trafic is the reason it didn't do much better than Playtime among the masses (that's the reason Jonathan Romney gives). I suspect it was due to the same brazen social critique condemning his former film to academic circles, resulting in the charge of pretension from newspaper reviewers and the like. Most people like to keep their seriousness and humor separate.


In the opening credit sequence, Tati looks straight down the maw of an automobile assembly line, creating an effect similar to the infinite regress of two mirrors facing each other. The men are as much like replicas as the parts they're pushing through the machine. After having spent a couple years doing register duty in retail, a musician buddy of mine commented the other night that if America spent as much time habituating its citizens to the piano keys as it does to menial tasks in the service of commerce, the creative possibilites would be limitless. As it stands, those guys in that shot don't stand much of a chance of doing anything else with the procedural knowledge they've acquired. Dan Lalande expresses a similar thought in his evaluation of the film in the latest Cineaction:

Happy Pig Day -- celebrate with pig-related dvds, vhs

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 1, 2009 02:17pm | Post a Comment
Miss Piggy in wardrobe malfunctionPooh and Piglet Walt Disney's Three Little Pigs

This Week At The New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, March 1, 2009 10:45am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly!

The March / April calendar is now online:
www.NewBevCinema.com

Printed calendars will arrive later this week.


Sunday, Monday & Tuesday 1, 2 & 3

Superhero Cinema

Batman
(1989) 20th Anniversary!
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0096895/
dir. Tim Burton, starring Michael Keaton, Jack Nicholson, Kim Basinger, Billy Dee Williams
Sun: 4:30 only; Mon/Tue: 7:30, Watch The Trailer!

Superman
(1978)

http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0078346/
dir. Richard Donner, starring Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, Gene Hackman, Ned Beatty, Marlon Brando
Sun: 7:00 only; Mon/Tue: 9:55, Watch The Trailer!